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Washington Drivers Get Two More Weeks With Studded Tires

OLYMPIA, Wash. - The Washington State Department of Transportation extended the studded-tire season through the end of the day Monday, April 16, as forecasts call for possible winter driving conditions through the heavily-traveled Easter weekend.

This year, we have a combination of winter weather still in the forecast for much of the state, with spring break and Easter right around the corner, we wanted to give drivers the chance to travel before having to take off their studded tires. - Chris Christopher, WSDOT director of maintenance operations

Studded tires are legal in Washington from Nov. 1 to March 31, unless WSDOT grants an extension. WSDOT officials don’t anticipate any further extensions beyond April 16.

Aberdeen Police Arrest Two After Weekend Burglaries

Two teens have been taken into custody on felony charges after a recent crackdown in South Aberdeen. Lieutenant C.J. Chastain with the Aberdeen Police...

Winter Park Schedule Announced

OLYMPIA, Wash. - The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission announced its 2012/2013 winter schedule, with more than 60 parks remaining open seven days a week.

Each year, the Commission publishes a winter schedule that establishes which parks will remain open, which will close and which will offer limited services, such as a reduced number of camping sites and restrooms. The schedule published by the Commission maintains services within the current operating budget and provides a geographic balance of visitor services during the winter months. 

The winter schedule is attached to this release and also is available online at www.parks.wa.gov/parkschedule/. It indicates that this season, more than 60 parks are remaining open seven days a week, 22 parks are closed until dates in March through May, 23 parks have partial openings and four parks are remaining open during the winter on weekends and holidays only. Tolmie State Park is open Wednesdays through Sundays through April 15, and Goldendale Observatory is open 2 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 10 p.m. Fridays through Sundays and by appointment Wednesday through Thursdays through March 31.


“Go Outside and Play!” It’s Great Outdoors Week in WA

Washingtonians don't have to wait until Labor Day weekend for an outdoor adventure. Saturday is the start of Great Outdoors Week, a celebration of the beauty and diversity of the state's public lands.

More than two-thirds of Americans use public lands for camping, climbing, fishing and more, according to the Washington Wilderness Coalition, but that means one-third still need an introduction. This is the week to get it, says Sarah Krueger, conservation manager for The Mountaineers.

"It could be anything from attending an ice cream social with the Washington Wilderness Coalition, going on a long hike with The Mountaineers, or actually helping out and working on trails with Washington Trails Association."

Nearly 50 events are listed online at wawild.org. Organizers say they'll be celebrating, but also informing people of what they call unprecedented efforts to roll back protections for public lands in Congress.

No Injuries, Apartment Fire Prompts Evacuation of Broadway Manor in Aberdeen

No injuries were reported after a fire in an apartment of the Broadway Manor at 101 West Second Street in Aberdeen just...

Book Signing Event, as Local Author Reveals Ocean Shores History

Mount Pleasant, SC - New from local author Gene Woodwick is Ocean Shores, the latest title in Arcadia Publishing’s Images of America Series. Ocean Shores boasts more than 200 vintage black-and-white photographs along with a supportive narrative.

 

Ocean Shores was the newest city in Washington for nearly 40 years, but for centuries before it had been a place of permanent occupation and food gathering for Native American tribes and a place for sea otter hunters, pioneers and settlers to reach the interior of the Olympic Peninsula. Before Ocean Shores, there was the dream of a town called Cedarville followed by the reality of Lone Tree with its post office and 200 residents.

 

Point Brown Peninsula was a village of survival for Polynesian Kanakas, Finns living on the edge of society, migrant workers called Bluebills and a Hooverville for depression-era families. After World War II when developers first conceived of creating a "Venice of the West," many said their dream would never last. However, in 1970, Ocean Shores became a city and today has entered its 50th year of development.

New from local author Gene Woodwick is Ocean Shores, the latest title in Arcadia Publishing’s Images of America Series. Ocean Shores boasts more than 200 vintage black-and-white photographs along with a supportive narrative.

 

Ocean Shores was the newest city in Washington for nearly 40 years, but for centuries before it had been a place of permanent occupation and food gathering for Native American tribes and a place for sea otter hunters, pioneers and settlers to reach the interior of the Olympic Peninsula. Before Ocean Shores, there was the dream of a town called Cedarville followed by the reality of Lone Tree with its post office and 200 residents.

 

Point Brown Peninsula was a village of survival for Polynesian Kanakas, Finns living on the edge of society, migrant workers called Bluebills and a Hooverville for depression-era families. After World War II when developers first conceived of creating a "Venice of the West," many said their dream would never last. However, in 1970, Ocean Shores became a city and today has entered its 50th year of development.

 

Author Gene Woodwick has collected the history of Ocean Shores for 50 years as a local journalist and a long-time property owner.

 

Join us for a book signing!

 

Saturday, Sept 25th from 11am-1pm

Aberdeen Museum of History

111 East Third Street, Aberdeen, Washington 98520 

(360) 533-1976

 

Available at area bookstores, independent retailers, and online retailers, or through Arcadia Publishing at (888)-313-2665 or www.arcadiapublishing.com

 

Arcadia Publishing is the leading publisher of local and regional history in the United States.  Our mission is to make history accessible and meaningful through the publication of books on the heritage of America’s people and places.  Have we done a book on your town?  Visit www.arcadiapublishing.com.

Washington and Oregon update oil spill plan, input sought on Lower Columbia River plan

In response to the uptick in the amount of crude oil being transported by rail through inland areas of Washington and Oregon, the western...

Mason Co. Water & power outages lead to boil water order

OLYMPIA - Weather-related power outages today in Mason County have left about 700 homes and businesses along Hood Canal without water service or with low water pressure.

For those with low water pressure the state Department of Health recommends they boil tap water or use bottled water for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and preparing food. The agency recommends heating the water to a brisk boil for one minute, then allowing the water to cool before using.

Low water pressure can allow contaminants to enter the water system. Those without water should use bottled water until service is restored. Once water is restored, people should boil it before use until the health advisory ends.

People who still have water should conserve it to prevent their taps from running dry. Conservation actions include limiting laundry and non-essential water use. When water service and pressure are restored, turn on all cold-water taps in the house and let them run until any air is released and the water runs clear.

Wind Advisory and Flood Watch in Effect – Snow Showers Possible This Week

The National Weather Service in Seattle has forecast a potential for snow showers anytime from Wednesday night through Saturday night. No accumulations are expected however hazardous driving conditions could occur during a snow squall event.

There is a Wind Advisory for the North and Central Coast until 4am Wednesday morning with sustained winds expected to be 30-35mph , gusting to 45-50mph. The time of greatest impact is expected to be near midnight. Localized power outages could occur. DO NOT venture near downed power lines or trees.

The Flood Watch remains in effect until Wednesday afternoon for all Grays Harbor County. Heavy rain is expected throughout the county and in all mountain areas which will increase the chances for all rivers and streams to rise quickly. The river of most concern is the Satsop River, although models forecast it cresting at 32.15 feet which is BELOW flood stage of 34 feet at Satsop. Localized small stream flooding and pooling of water on roadways could occur, impacting driving conditions today.