Registered Sex Offender Working For Carnival at Pacific County Fair Arrested

South Bend, WA. – This morning a registered sex offender identified as Jason A. Miner, age 38, and of Yakima was arrested by Pacific County Sheriff deputies at the Pacific County Jail. Miner was reporting to the Sheriff’s Office to register within our county as required by state law. Miner was in Pacific County working for the company contracting carnival rides and activities at the Pacific County Fair.

Miner was arrested on an outstanding felony warrant out of Yakima County for failing to register as a sex offender. Miner was booked into Pacific County Jail for the warrant. Bail is set at 10,000.00.

WDFW Commission sets waterfowl seasons, discusses elk with hoof disease

With a record number of ducks counted on the northern breeding grounds this year, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission approved migratory waterfowl hunting seasons for this fall and winter during a public meeting in Olympia Aug. 8-9.

The commission, a citizen panel appointed by the governor to set policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), also approved a new regulation that requires hunters to leave on site the hooves of any elk taken in southwest Washington to help minimize the spread of a disease that affects the region’s herds.

Under the waterfowl hunting package, most hunting opportunities in Washington will be similar to last year. That includes a statewide duck season that will be open for 107 days, starting Oct. 11-15 and continuing Oct. 18-Jan. 25. A special youth hunting weekend also is scheduled Sept. 20-21.

Limits for mallard, pintail, scaup, redhead, goldeneye, harlequin, scoter and long-tailed duck will remain the same as last season. But the commission reduced the daily bag limit for canvasback to one per day because of decreasing numbers throughout North America.

Goose hunting seasons will vary among management areas across the state, but most open mid-October and run through late January. Limits for most geese did not change, except the commission did increase the daily bag limit for cackling geese in southwest Washington from three to four.

The commission also increased the overall harvest quota for dusky Canada geese in southwest Washington from 45 to 85 birds. As in previous years, hunters are limited to one dusky Canada goose a season in southwest Washington.

The goose and duck hunting seasons approved by the commission are based on state and federal waterfowl population estimates and guidelines. According to those estimates, a record number of ducks – approximately 49 million – were on the breeding grounds this spring in Canada and the United States.

Details on the waterfowl hunting seasons will be available later this week on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/regulations/.

In other action, the commission approved several land transactions, including the purchase of two parcels totaling nearly 2,900 acres of shrub-steppe in Yakima County. The land, located about five miles west of Naches, serves as critical habitat for a variety of wildlife, and is an important connection between summer and winter range for the Yakima elk herd.

The two parcels will be acquired through a partnership with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Cowiche Canyon Conservancy and the state Department of Ecology (DOE). The 2,588-acre property will be purchased for $1.38 million, while a 305-acre property will cost $170,000.

DOE and the Kennewick Irrigation District are providing the funding to acquire the two parcels to mitigate for the loss of shrub-steppe habitat that was converted to agricultural land. The properties will be managed as part of WDFW’s Oak Creek Wildlife Area.

The commission also received a briefing on a scientific panel’s determination that the disease that leaves elk in the St. Helens and Willapa Hills areas of southwest Washington with misshapen hooves likely involves a type of bacterial infection.

Members of the panel, composed of veterinarians and researchers throughout the state, agreed that the disease closely resembles contagious ovine digital dermatitis in sheep. The panel’s diagnosis is consistent with the findings of the USDA National Animal Disease Center and four other independent diagnostic laboratories that have tested samples of elk hooves submitted by WDFW since last year.

For more information on elk hoof disease, see WDFW’s recent news release at http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/jun2314a/ and the department’s wildlife health webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/health/hoof_disease/.

In other business, the commission conducted public hearings on the 2015-2021 Game Management Plan and proposed updates to the state Hydraulic Code.

The commission also received briefings on the department’s legislative proposals for 2015, proposed 2015-2017 operating and capital budget requests, and new potential revenue sources.

In addition, the commission was briefed on the impacts of a possible reduction in state General Funds. The potential cuts are in response to Gov. Jay Inslee’s directive to state agencies to prioritize their activities and identify reductions totaling 15 percent.

$11 million in grants from Ecology to help prevent flood damage upriver

OLYMPIA – Floods cause more damage than any other natural disasters in Washington. The Department of Ecology has awarded nearly $11 million in grants to recipients across the state to help prevent damage in flood-prone communities.

 

Grants reach from Silverdale on Kitsap Peninsula east to Yakima County and north from Deming to Skamokawa near the Columbia River and points in between. Projects will reduce flood hazards to people, property, critical facilities and transportation corridors while helping to restore habitat and water quality for fish and wildlife. In all, 13 projects are funded through the competitive flood management grant process.

 

For instance, in Whatcom County some $1.4 million in state funding will be used to complete construction of a new 800-foot-long levee setback from the Nooksack River to protect the town of Deming, school buildings and sewage lagoon from floodwaters. The levee will replace an earthen berm that frequently overtops from floodwaters.

 

The city of Auburn will leverage $532,000 in state funding in a $5 million project to improve flood protection along Mill Creek. The project will focus on improving floodplain connectivity to respond to high-flow events and create conditions to restore riparian cover to reduce water temperatures and improve water quality for fish rearing.

 

In Yakima County, $1.39 million will be used to relocate an existing auto wrecking yard and purchase floodway properties in a flood-prone area along the Naches River known as the Rambler’s Park levee setback project. Improvements, including reducing the size of an existing levee, will increase the floodplain by 9 acres and create channels to improve floodplain functions. Yakima County is also receiving another $1 million for other levee work along the Naches and Yakima rivers.

 

Using a grant of $1.3 million, the city of Ellensburg will reduce the magnitude and frequency of flood damage to structures in west Ellensburg along the Yakima River with the restoration of floodplain functions to Currier and Reecer creeks. At the same time, new instream spawning and rearing habitat for fish will be created and riparian and floodplain areas will be planted with native vegetation. That work will protect 100 homes and businesses.

 

Other grant recipients include:

Kitsap County – $2 million for floodplain restoration on Clear Creek in Silverdale

Chelan County – $780,616 for improvements to Nason Creek

Pierce County – $525,000 to acquire property in floodplain for improvement on Ball Creek, Puyallup River

Tulalip Tribe – $464,044 for the Qwuloolt floodplain restoration project along Ebey Slough

City of Yakima – $200,000 for work increasing flood conveyance under two bridges crossing Wide Hollow Creek

Wahkiakum County – $50,000 to dike and address flood hazards at Skamokawa

 

State disciplines health care providers

OLYMPIA – The Washington State Department of Health has taken disciplinary actions or withdrawn charges against health care providers in our state.

The department’s Health Systems Quality Assurance Division works with boards, commissions, and advisory committees to set licensing standards for more than 80 health care professions (e.g., medical doctors, nurses, counselors).

Information about health care providers is on the agency website. Click on “Look up a healthcare provider license” in the “How Do I?” section of the Department of Health website (doh.wa.gov). The site includes information about a health care provider’s license status, the expiration and renewal date of their credential, disciplinary actions and copies of legal documents issued after July 1998. This information is also available by calling 360-236-4700. Consumers who think a health care provider acted unprofessionally are encouraged to call and report their complaint.

Benton County

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program charged registered nursing assistant Elizabeth Nahleen Messinger (NA60020561) with unprofessional conduct. Charges say a resident at the adult family home where Messinger worked loaned or gave her $500. Messinger allegedly admitted accepting the money but hasn’t repaid it.

Clark County

 

In February 2014 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program ended probation for chemical dependency professional trainee Christina Ann Gjesvold, also known as Christina Ann Stroup (CO60224108).

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission entered an agreement with registered nurse Brenda Lee Hanson (RN00129197) that reinstates her license and requires her to participate in a substance abuse monitoring program. Hanson admitted diverting controlled substances while working at two Oregon hospitals. Her Oregon license was suspended and then placed on probation for three years before she voluntarily surrendered it, saying she doesn’t plan on working in Oregon.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program conditionally granted a certified nursing assistant credential to Michelle Shree Gray (NC60356138) and placed her credential on probation for at least five years. She was convicted in Washington of one felony and in Oregon of crimes equivalent to six felonies and five gross misdemeanors between 2000 and 2009.

 

Cowlitz County

 

In February 2014 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program ended probation for chemical dependency professional trainee Brandi Michelle Olney (CO60211959).

 

Grant County

 

In February 2014 the Respiratory Care Practitioner Program entered an agreement with respiratory care practitioner Colette K. Lancaster (LR00003822) that places her credential on probation for at least two years. Lancaster practiced outside her scope when she discontinued a patient’s oxygen flow without a physician’s order.

 

King County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission charged registered nurse Shaun J. Richardson (RN00131344) with unprofessional conduct. Richardson allegedly didn’t comply with a substance abuse monitoring contract.

 

In February 2014 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program conditionally granted a chemical dependency professional credential to Kimberly Marie Rohwer (CP60229246) and placed it on probation for at least three years. Rohwer, who must enroll in a substance abuse monitoring program, received a chemical dependency professional trainee credential in 2012 that was placed on probation.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program entered an agreement with certified nursing assistant Alexander Gachie Mbugua (NC60029168) requiring him to enroll in a substance abuse monitoring program. Mbugua was convicted of driving while intoxicated twice in 2010 and once in 2011.

 

In February 2014 the Medical Assistant Program conditionally granted an interim medical assistant credential to Edrie Roy Caminong (IC60439546) requiring him to continue complying with a substance abuse monitoring contract that he signed when he was granted a health care assistant credential in 2010.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission charged registered nurse Paulus R. Kutrich (RN00169953) with unprofessional conduct. Allegations are that Kutrich didn’t comply with a substance abuse monitoring contract.

 

In February 2014 the Unlicensed Practice Program notified Lianhua Li of its intent to issue a cease-and-desist order. Li, who has no massage practitioner credential, allegedly provided massage to a client.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program ended probation for certified nursing assistant Biniam Beraki Belay (NC60223264).

 

Kitsap County

 

In February 2014 the Occupational Therapy Board ended conditions on the credential of occupational therapist Linda S. Baker (OT00000498).

 

In February 2014 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program ended conditions on the credential of chemical dependency professional trainee Carolyn Rae Bjorkheim (CO60197879).

 

Pierce County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission amended a statement of charges against licensed practical nurse Bilinda Hunter (LP00049336) to delete two allegations of inadequate documentation or diversion of narcotic medication.

 

Snohomish County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission entered an agreement with registered nurse Cassandra L. Abbott (RN00097911) that places her credential on probation for at least two years, fines her $1,000, and requires her to complete continuing education in ethics, legal issues and professional boundaries. Abbott sent hydrocodone prescriptions to a pharmacy for a patient at least 37 times. The patient was another clinic employee’s husband. Abbott listed a prescribing physician on the prescriptions who wasn’t the patient’s primary care provider. The physician listed didn’t know of or approve the prescriptions.

 

Spokane County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program reinstated the certified nursing assistant credential of Denia Caridad Correa (NC10046540). Her credential was suspended in 2011 after she didn’t respond to a Department of Health inquiry about apparent irregularities involving patient medication.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission reinstated the registered nursing credential of Robin Marie Pena (RN60219122) and ordered her to enroll in a substance abuse monitoring program. Pena’s license was indefinitely suspended in 2013 after she surrendered her Alaska license in connection with allegations of a falsified application, and that she had a chemical dependency.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission ended probation for registered nurse Linda C. Weinzimmer-Kirk (RN00084119).

 

In March 2014 the Unlicensed Practice Program notified Melissa R. Hubbard of its intent to issue a cease-and-desist order after she allegedly engaged in massage practice in 2013 even though her massage practitioner credential expired in 2008.

 

 

Stevens County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program charged certified nursing assistant Jennifer L. McKinney (NC10075495) with unprofessional conduct. McKinney allegedly didn’t comply with a substance abuse monitoring contract.

 

Yakima County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program charged certified nursing assistant Elizabeth Hernandez Aldana (NC60299567) with unprofessional conduct. In 2013 Aldana was convicted of third-degree assault — domestic violence.

 

Out of State

 

Oregon: In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program entered an agreement with certified nursing assistant Guadalupe Gutierrez (NC60151060) requiring her to enroll in a substance abuse monitoring program. In 2012 Gutierrez was convicted in Oregon of driving while intoxicated.

 

Oregon: In March 2014 the Dental Commission charged dentist Delon Karsten Gilbert (DE60361877) with unprofessional conduct. In 2013 Gilbert pleaded no-contest in Oregon to unlawful possession of cocaine.

 

Pennsylvania: In February 2014 the Osteopathic Board charged osteopathic physician David Thomas Steves (OP60243088) with unprofessional conduct. Steves allegedly visited an elderly female patient’s home several times without an invitation, and discussed his sexual problems in his marriage with the patient. Charges say Steves acknowledged the allegations and admitted having gone too far in discussing his personal problems with her. The patient allegedly interpreted the comments as a proposition for sex with her.

 

Note to Editors: Health care providers charged with unprofessional conduct have 20 days to respond to the Department of Health in writing. The case then enters the settlement process. If no disciplinary agreement can be reached, the case will go to a hearing.

The Department of Health website (www.doh.wa.gov) is your source for a healthy dose of information. Also, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

State revokes, suspends licenses, certifications, registrations of health care providers

OLYMPIA ¾ The Washington State Department of Health has revoked or suspended the licenses, certifications, or registrations of health care providers in our state. The department has also immediately suspended the credentials of people who have been prohibited from practicing in other states.

The department’s Health Systems Quality Assurance Division works with boards, commissions and advisory committees to set licensing standards for more than 80 health care professions (e.g., medical doctors, nurses, counselors).

Information about health care providers is on the agency’s website. Click on “Look up a healthcare provider license” in the “How Do I?” section of the Department of Health home page (doh.wa.gov). The site includes information about a health care provider’s license status, the expiration and renewal date of their credential, disciplinary actions and copies of legal documents issued after July 1998. This information is also available by calling 360-236-4700. Consumers who think a health care provider acted unprofessionally are also encouraged to call and report their complaint.

Continue reading State revokes, suspends licenses, certifications, registrations of health care providers

WDFW Commission approves land purchases for wildlife habitat, outdoor recreation

The properties, both situated on the eastern slope of the Cascade Mountains, will be managed to benefit wildlife, while also providing public access for outdoor recreation, Wecker said.

Dan Budd, WDFW real estate manager, said the department secured an option to purchase the 5,497-acre Manastash property in Yakima County from the Nature Conservancy for an assessed price of $4,675,000.

Once that sale is finalized, the property will become part of WDFW’s L.T. Murray Wildlife Area, the third such acquisition in that area for WDFW since 2007 under the multi-party Heart of the Cascades land-conservation project.

The smaller property in Yakima County, historically owned by timber companies, is located within WDFW’s Wenas Wildlife Area and home to elk, bighorn sheep, mule deer and a variety of other species. The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation has offered to sell the property to the department for its assessed price of $230,000.

Budd noted that WDFW will make payments-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILT) to counties on both properties once the purchases have been finalized. PILT payments are designed to compensate counties for the loss of local property taxes, which cannot be levied on state-owned lands.

In other business, the commission heard comments from nearly a dozen people about a proposed plan to develop a new policy for Grays Harbor salmon fisheries. That policy, which will set the direction for resource conservation and catch allocations, is the focus of ongoing public meetings in western Washington. Information about the proposed policy is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/fisheries/grays_harbor_salmon/ on WDFW’s website.

Senate Passes Extension of Cantwell-Championed Rural Schools, Roads Program


 

SRS expired at the end of fiscal year 2012, and the last payments went out in December 2012. During 2012, Washington state received about $20 million in SRS program funding to help fund schools, roads, search and rescue, and other important county programs. That was the fourth highest total after Oregon, California and Idaho.

                                                                                                     

“Secure Rural Schools is a lifeline to communities all across Washington state,” said Cantwell. “These payments invest in the schools and roads that are necessary for communities and businesses to thrive. I applaud the Senate for taking bipartisan action to continue this key program for rural communities and look forward to a debate on a long-term extension of the program.”

 

In 2012, counties in Washington state received about $20 million in SRS payments, including: Chelan County, $1.6 million; Grays Harbor County, $400,251; Jefferson County, $953,725; Kittitas County, $680,350; Lewis County, $2,165,436; Skagit County, $639,849; Skamania County, $3.9 million; Snohomish County, $737,202; Whatcom County, $908,504; and Yakima County, $1.4 million. The full list of SRS payments to Washington counties can be found here.


Cantwell has been a leader in pushing for a long-term continuation of SRS. In March during a U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources (ENR) Committee hearing, Cantwell called for an extension of SRS and mandatory full funding of the Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) program, while also making them simpler, more transparent, and more responsive to the needs of rural communities.

 

At the hearing, committee members heard testimony from Paul Pearce, president of the National Forest Counties and School Coalition and a former Skamania County Commissioner.

 

“My own county, Skamania County, is a county of 11,000 people,” said Pearce during his opening statement to the committee. “I was the commissioner there until just the beginning of this year. If we were to lose this funding, two of the four school districts will in fact close.”

 

Skamania County was the highest recipient of SRS payments in Washington state in FY 2012, receiving nearly one-fifth of the state’s total SRS payments.

 

In 2012, Cantwell supported an amendment (S. Amdt. 1825) to the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (H.R.4348) that extended the SRS payments and mandatory full funding of PILT for one year. She joined 26 other senators in May 2012 in sending a letter to the Senate conferees negotiating a final transportation reauthorization agreement with the House urging the extension of both county payment programs. Cantwell also cosponsored the bipartisan County Payments Reauthorization Act of 2011, which would extend SRS for five years as well as fully fund PILT for five additional years.

 

Under federal law, national forest land cannot be taxed by counties or other state and local jurisdictions. In place of taxes, a 100-year-old U.S. Forest Service policy shares revenue generated by timber harvests on federal lands near forest communities. Funds can be used for schools, roads, search and rescue, and other essential services. As timber harvests declined during the 1990s, hundreds of counties experienced a severe revenue loss. Since 2001, the SRS and PILT programs have helped areas hit hardest by declining timber sales, providing funding for schools and roads in communities nationwide.

Coroner Says Homicide Was Manner of Death For Montesano Woman

MONTESANO, Wash. – The Grays Harbor County Coroner says Homicide was the manner of death for 58 year old Kornelia Engelmann of Montesano. Deputy Coroner Lane Youmans tells us the Montesano woman died of “multiple blunt force injuries to the head and torso with internal bleeding.

The man suspected of killing Englemann, 56 year old Eugene Elkins was booked into the Grays Harbor County Jail yesterday evening, after detectives retrieved him from Yakima County, where he was apprehended Wednesday.

County Undersheriff Rick Scott said Engleman’s body was discovered in her home on Clemens road Wednesday morning, Elkins was captured by police in Yakima County that afternoon.

Elk Foundation Grants Fund Research and Habitat Work in State

RMEF grants will help fund the following 2012 projects in Washington, listed by county:

Asotin County—Prescribe burn 4,200 acres to rejuvenate decadent grasses for foraging elk and deer in the Wenatchee Creek area of Umatilla National Forest (also affects Garfield County); treat 200 acres of noxious weeds in the Blue Mountains Wildlife Area complex (also affects Garfield and Columbia counties); treat 816 acres of noxious weeds on public and private tracts across the county. 

Columbia County—Improve public-land forage for elk, mule deer and white-tailed deer by treating noxious weeds on 1,100 acres in the North Touchet River drainage of the Blue Mountains; treat weeds and seed native grasses on 1,950 acres in the Starvout Ridge area near North Patit Creek and Mahloney Mountain. 

Grays Harbor County—Thin forest canopy to improve forage for Roosevelt’s elk in the West Fork Humptulips area of Olympic National Forest. 

King County—Research Snoqualmie Valley elk herd composition, habitat use and movement patterns using GPS collars to identify highway crossings and improve management plans. 

Lewis County—Remove encroaching conifers to improve 290 acres of forage for elk and other wildlife in the Huckleberry Planning Area of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. 

Okanogan County—Provide sponsorship for Bonaparte Lake 2012 Youth Fishing Derby to introduce students to outdoor recreation and conservation.

Pend Oreille County—Prescribe burn 200 acres to rejuvenate forage for elk in the upper Middle Fork of Calispel Creek area of Colville National Forest; prescribe burn 90 acres in the Lost Creek area of Colville National Forest. 

Statewide—In coordination with state wildlife agencies in Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Washington and Wyoming, research effects of habitat, weather, predators and other factors affecting elk recruitment and future management models; provide sponsorship for the Washington State 2012 Youth Conservation Camp held in San Juan County to introduce students to outdoor recreation and conservation. 

Stevens County—Prescribe burn 753 acres of elk winter range in the Hope Mountain area of Colville National Forest. 

Yakima County—Thin trees and create forest openings across 123 acres, plus treat 300 acres of noxious weeds, to improve forage for elk in Oak Creek Wildlife Area. 

Projects are selected for grants using science-based criteria and a committee of RMEF volunteers and staff along with representatives from partnering agencies and universities. RMEF staff and volunteers select education projects to receive grants.

Partners for 2012 projects in Washington include the Bureau of Land Management, Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Forest Service and other agencies, tribes, organizations, corporations and landowners. 

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
RMEF is leading a conservation initiative that has protected or enhanced habitat on over 6 million acres—an area larger than Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, Glacier, Yosemite, Rocky Mountain and Great Smoky Mountains national parks combined. RMEF also is a strong voice for hunters in access, wildlife management and conservation policy issues. RMEF members, partners and volunteers, working together as Team Elk, are making a difference all across elk country. Join us at www.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.

Grays Harbor County organizations get salmon recovery grants from state

The grants from the Salmon Recovery Funding Board ranged from $17,000 to $1.7 million. The funding goes for big and small restoration and recovery projects across the state, including work ranging from planting trees along streams to cool the water for salmon, to replacing culverts that prevent salmon from migrating to spawning habitat, to restoring entire floodplains.
 
Grants were given to projects in the below. Click here for details on each project.
 
Asotin County……………………….. $136,800
Benton County……………………… $115,362
Chelan County………………….. $1,143,123
Clallam County………………….. $4,131,462
Clark County…………………………. $510,452
Columbia County…………………. $787,113
Cowlitz County……………………… $706,695
Grays Harbor County……………. $870,343
Island County…………………….. $1,143,187
Jefferson County……………….. $2,277,856
King County………………………. $2,644,814
Kitsap County…………………….. $1,489,850
Kittitas County………………………. $328,500
Klickitat County…………………….. $265,650
Mason County……………………. $3,409,910
Okanogan County………………… $809,877
Pacific County……………………. $1,135,419
Pend Oreille County……………… $360,000
Pierce County……………………. $2,960,669
San Juan County………………. $1,458,776
Skagit County…………………….. $5,844,363
Snohomish County……………. $5,547,631
Thurston County………………… $1,320,675
Walla Walla County………………. $674,487
Wahkiakum County……………… $691,332
Whatcom County………………….. $951,215
Yakima County………………….. $1,120,053
 
 
"Local watershed groups develop these projects based on regional recovery plans and with the support of regional salmon recovery organizations. This “bottom-up” approach to salmon recovery ensures that funding is focused on what they see happening in their communities," Tharinger said. "The projects are then checked by the state’s technical review panel to make sure they will help recover salmon in the most cost-effective manner. This local and state partnership has made Washington a national model in salmon recovery."
Several populations of salmon were put on the federal list of endangered species in 1991. By then, the number of salmon had fallen to only 40 percent of historic levels in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and California. By 1999, almost three-fourths of Washington’s watersheds were affected by Endangered Species Act listings of salmon and bull trout. Those listings set off a series of activities including the formation of the Salmon Recovery Funding Board to oversee the investment of state and federal funds for salmon recovery. Since 2000, the board has awarded nearly $404 million in grants, funded by federal and state dollars, for 1,307 projects. Grantees have contributed nearly $160 million in matching resources, bringing the total investment to more than $564 million.
The funding comes from the federal Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund and is matched by state funds from the sale of bonds. The funding for these grants was approved by Congress and the Washington Legislature earlier this year. On Thursday, Washington State received news that $80 million in 2010 federal funding for Washington and several other western states is in the final budget bill before Congress.
“We want to thank our Congressional delegation, especially Senator Patty Murray and Representative Norm Dicks, who have been champions of salmon recovery work,” Tharinger said. “Without their help at the national level, this important work wouldn’t be able to continue. All of Washington will benefit from these grants.”
The Salmon Recovery Funding Board’s citizen members are appointed by the Governor and they are: Harry Barber, Washougal; Commissioner Donald “Bud” Hover, Okanogan County; Bob Nichols, Olympia; Commissioner Steve Tharinger, Clallam County; and David Troutt, Dupont. Five state agency directors or their designees also serve as members (Conservation Commission, Department of Ecology, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Natural Resources and Department of Transportation). Staff support to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and the process of project recruitment and review is provided by the Washington Recreation and Conservation Office. Information about the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and the Recreation and Conservation Office is available online at www.rco.wa.gov.