Tag Archive for Twin Harbors

Razor clam digs approved to start May 13, tentative dates listed through June 1

Westport clam diggers

OLYMPIA – Clam diggers hoping for a few late-season razor clam digs on Washington beaches will have plenty of options to consider.
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today approved eight days of digging, beginning May 13. WDFW gave the OK for the series of digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.
The agency also announced a list of proposed digs, which would run May 27 through June 1. Final approval of these digs will depend on marine toxin tests that will be conducted closer to the start date, said Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager. The agency will announce final approval based on the results of the tests.
Ayres noted that the next series of digs includes dates at Copalis and Mocrocks beaches, which are co-managed with the Quinault Indian Nation (QIN).
WDFW was able to add days at Copalis because the QIN provided clams from their share to the state share, said Phil Anderson, WDFW director.
“This is a perfect example of how WDFW and QIN work together to co-manage this resource,” Anderson said. “We appreciate QIN’s willingness to share a portion of their harvest quota with us thereby contributing to the success of these final digs and providing an economic boost to businesses in the area.”

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

May 13, Tuesday, 6:21 a.m., -0.6 feet, Twin Harbors
May 14, Wednesday, 7:02 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 15, Thursday, 7:44 a.m., -1.5 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 16, Friday, 8:27 a.m., -1.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis
May 17, Saturday, 9:12 a.m., -1.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 18, Sunday, 9:59 a.m., -1.5 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 19, Monday, 10:50 a.m., -1.1 feet, Twin Harbors
May 20, Tuesday, 11:44 a.m., -0.6 feet, Twin Harbors

Digs that have been proposed but not yet approved are tentatively scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

May 27, Tuesday, 6:24 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 28, Wednesday, 7:06 a.m., -1.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 29, Thursday, 7:45 a.m., -1.4 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 30, Friday, 8:23 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 31, Saturday, 9:00 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
June 1, Sunday, 9:37 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Diggers may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, unless they possess a designated harvester card.
Clam diggers and other beachgoers should avoid disturbing western snowy plovers, said Brock Hoenes, WDFW wildlife biologist. The small white birds, which nest on the state’s coastal beaches from April through August, are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act as threatened and by the state as endangered.
Hoenes also asks that diggers avoid signed upland beach areas at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, which are closed to protect nesting western snowy plovers. At Long Beach, the closed area is located north of Oysterville Road from the state park boundary north to Leadbetter Point. At Twin Harbors, the closed area is located just south of Cranberry Beach Road and continues south for approximately 1.5 miles.
Razor clam diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.
For updates on upcoming digs, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

 

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Morning razor clam digs continue this week at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, more digs possible mid-May

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Morning razor clam digs continue on the Long Beach and Twin Harbors beaches through Sunday, with a 3-day dig approved on Mocrocks beach May 2nd through the 4th.

WDFW gave the OK for the series of digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, noted that more razor clam digs could be announced for mid-May.

“We’ll look at harvest levels after these upcoming digs are finished and determine whether we have enough clams to offer more opportunities in May,” he said.

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • Apr. 27, Sunday, 5:53 a.m., -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Apr. 28, Monday, 6:39 a.m., -0.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Apr. 29, Tuesday, 7:22 a.m., -1.1 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Apr. 30, Wednesday, 8:03 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • May 01, Thursday, 8:43 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • May 02, Friday, 9:23 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • May 03, Saturday, 10:04 a.m., -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • May 04, Sunday, 10:47 a.m., 0.1 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Diggers may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, unless they possess a designated harvester card.

Clam diggers and other beachgoers should avoid disturbing western snowy plovers, said Brock Hoenes, WDFW wildlife biologist. The small white birds, which nest on the state’s coastal beaches from April through August, are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act as threatened and by the state as endangered.

Hoenes noted snowy plovers – and their eggs – are extremely vulnerable at this time of year because the birds nest in dry sand.

“We urge clam diggers to be careful when driving on the beach or walking through the dunes,” he said. “Under state law, all vehicles are required to travel along the extreme upper limit of the hard sand. When in doubt, follow the path marked by multiple tire tracks.”

Hoenes also asks that diggers avoid signed upland beach areas at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, which are closed to protect nesting western snowy plovers. At Long Beach, the closed area is located north of Oysterville Road from the state park boundary north to Leadbetter Point. At Twin Harbors, the closed area is located just south of Cranberry Beach Road and continues south for approximately 1.5 miles.

Razor clam diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For updates on upcoming digs, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html

Please visit:http://kbkw.com/local-news/140874for the complete story

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Morning razor clam digs continue this week, more digs possible mid-May

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Morning razor clam digs continue on the Long Beach and Twin Harbors beaches through Sunday, with a 3-day dig approved on Mocrocks beach May 2nd through the 4th.

WDFW gave the OK for the series of digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, noted that more razor clam digs could be announced for mid-May.

“We’ll look at harvest levels after these upcoming digs are finished and determine whether we have enough clams to offer more opportunities in May,” he said.

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

 

  • Apr. 27, Sunday, 5:53 a.m., -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Apr. 28, Monday, 6:39 a.m., -0.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Apr. 29, Tuesday, 7:22 a.m., -1.1 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Apr. 30, Wednesday, 8:03 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • May 01, Thursday, 8:43 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • May 02, Friday, 9:23 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • May 03, Saturday, 10:04 a.m., -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • May 04, Sunday, 10:47 a.m., 0.1 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

 

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Diggers may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, unless they possess a designated harvester card.

Clam diggers and other beachgoers should avoid disturbing western snowy plovers, said Brock Hoenes, WDFW wildlife biologist. The small white birds, which nest on the state’s coastal beaches from April through August, are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act as threatened and by the state as endangered.

Hoenes noted snowy plovers – and their eggs – are extremely vulnerable at this time of year because the birds nest in dry sand.

“We urge clam diggers to be careful when driving on the beach or walking through the dunes,” he said. “Under state law, all vehicles are required to travel along the extreme upper limit of the hard sand. When in doubt, follow the path marked by multiple tire tracks.”

Hoenes also asks that diggers avoid signed upland beach areas at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, which are closed to protect nesting western snowy plovers. At Long Beach, the closed area is located north of Oysterville Road from the state park boundary north to Leadbetter Point. At Twin Harbors, the closed area is located just south of Cranberry Beach Road and continues south for approximately 1.5 miles.

Razor clam diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For updates on upcoming digs, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html

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WDFW plans additional razor clam digs in late April, early May

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Washington’s remarkable razor clam season continues as state shellfish managers plan to add digs in late-April and early May.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced a tentative schedule of new digs in light of updated harvest estimates that show a sufficient number of clams to support the additional openings.

“This has been a great year for razor clams,” said Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager.  “Clams this year have been bigger than average and abundant enough to add another series of digs.”

Final approval on upcoming digs will be announced after marine-toxin test results confirm the clams are safe to eat.

“Digging at Mocrocks has been fabulous lately,” Ayres said, noting that the upcoming series of digs includes three dates at that beach.

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

•           Apr. 27, Sunday, 5:53 a.m.,  -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach

•           Apr. 28, Monday, 6:39 a.m., -0.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach

•           Apr. 29, Tuesday,  7:22 a.m., -1.1 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach

•           Apr. 30, Wednesday, 8:03 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach

•           May 01, Thursday, 8:43 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach

•           May 02, Friday, 9:23 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

•           May 03, Saturday, 10:04 a.m., -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

•           May 04, Sunday, 10:47 a.m., 0.1 feet,  Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

 

WDFW shellfish managers will analyze harvest data after this series of digs is completed. If enough clams remain for more digs, the best tides are around the weekend of May 17, Ayres said.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Razor clam diggers are reminded that they may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, except for those who possess designated harvester cards.

Diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

 

For updates on upcoming digs, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

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Week long razor clam dig starts Monday at Twin Harbors

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers today approved a series of morning razor-clam digs starting Monday, April 14, at Twin Harbors and expanding to include three other ocean beaches over the next week.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed at any beach after noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, reminds diggers that anyone age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

“It’s always a good idea to have a current license in hand before you reach the beach,” Ayres said. “Otherwise, you may find yourself waiting in line to buy one at low tide.”

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • April 14, Monday, 6:46 a.m.; +0.2 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 15, Tuesday, 7:24 a.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 16, Wednesday, 8:03 a.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 17, Thursday, 8:43 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 18, Friday, 9:26 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 19, Saturday, 10:14 a.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • April 20, Sunday, 11:06 a.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

Ayres noted that the weekend digs will coincide with two beachside events. The second annual Long Beach Razor Clam Festival is scheduled April 19-20, (see http://longbeachrazorclamfestival.com/ ) and Washington Coast Cleanup Day is set for April 19 (see http://www.coastsavers.org/ ).

Once the next series of digs is over, state shellfish managers will analyze harvest data and propose additional digging dates in the weeks ahead, Ayres said.

“This year’s season is nearing the end, but we’re not there yet,” he said. “We hope to offer more digging days into May.” 

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Upcoming razor clam dig approved, shifts from evening to morning digs

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers have approved a series of razor clam digs that starts Wednesday (March 26) on evening tides, then switches to morning tides Sunday (March 30) for five more days of digging.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said the switch from evening to morning digs reflects the moon’s seasonal effect on the tides.

“It gets a little tricky scheduling digs at this time of year, but the goal is to arrange openings during the best clam tides,” Ayres said. “The split schedule also provides an opportunity for back-to-back digs the evening of Saturday, March 29, and the morning of Sunday, March 30.”

Ayres also noted that diggers will have to purchase a 2014 license to participate in digs after March 31.

 

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • March 26, Wednesday, 3:52 p.m.; 0.3 feet; Twin Harbors
  • March 27, Thursday, 4:48 p.m.; 0.1 feet; Twin Harbors
  • March 28, Friday, 5:38 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 29, Saturday, 6:23 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

(Seasonal switch to morning tides)

  • March 30, Sunday, 6:53 a.m.; -0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks 
  • March 31, Monday, 7:39 a.m.; -0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 1, Tuesday, 8:22 a.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 2, Wednesday, 9:05 a.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 3, Thursday, 9:49 a.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

Starting April 1, all diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses range from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, and are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For updates on upcoming digs, see WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html .

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Razor clam dig approved, big bivalves await diggers on 4 coastal beaches

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

OLYMPIA – Plenty of fat clams await diggers who turn out for the next razor clam dig, set to run Feb. 26 through March 3 on various ocean beaches.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

As in previous openings, all digs are scheduled on evening tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said razor clams sampled in recent days are noticeably heavier than those tested earlier in the season. “With all the plankton in the water, the clams seem to be “fattening” up earlier than usual,” Ayres said. “Those clams will make for some tasty meals after the next opening.”

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • Feb. 26, Wednesday, 4:15 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Feb. 27, Thursday, 5:04 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • Feb. 28, Friday, 5:49 p.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 1, Saturday, 6:32 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • March 2, Sunday, 7:13 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 3, Monday, 7:53 p.m.; +0.3 feet; Twin Harbors
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Ayres noted that the beaches open for the greatest number of days are those with the most clams still available for harvest.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2013-14 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For updates on upcoming digs, see WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

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