Volunteers needed to count bicyclists and pedestrians for annual statewide survey

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Volunteers are needed in communities across the state to help count the number of people who walk or bike to their destinations. The information gathered this fall will be used to track progress toward the state’s goal of increasing bicycling and walking in Washington and reducing the number of vehicle miles driven.

 

The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) and the Cascade Bicycle Club are enlisting volunteers and organizations like FeetFirst and the Bicycle Alliance of Washington to count the numbers of people bicycling and walking on paths, bike lanes, sidewalks, and other facilities on Oct. 5, 6 and 7.

 

“We are working on ways to reduce the number of miles we drive each year, and counting bicyclists and pedestrians at specific locations can help us more accurately measure demand and the benefits of existing paths and trails,” said Washington Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond. “The counts also help us identify where future bicycle and pedestrian facilities are needed.”

L&I encourages attendance at public hearings on proposed workers’ compensation rate increase

TUMWATER, Wash. - The Department of Labor & Industries (L&I) said today it hopes for good attendance at public hearings next week on proposed workers’ compensation insurance rates for 2010.

The agency noted that heightened interest by workers’ compensation stakeholders, including a pre-hearing rally planned by the Building Industry Association of Washington (BIAW) October 28 in Tumwater, are good reminders of the importance of all voices being heard in the public hearing process.

“I look forward to hearing what members of the BIAW and other employers and workers have to say,” said Bob Malooly, assistant director for L&I’s Insurance Services Division. “It is a reminder that we need to hear from all stakeholders with an interest in workers’ compensation. Employers and workers all need a sound workers’ comp system when unfortunate injuries and illnesses occur in the workplace.”

WSDOT Survey Seeks WA Volunteers to Count Non-Motorized Traffic

OLYMPIA –Volunteers are needed in communities across the state to help count the number of people who walk or bike to their destinations. The information being gathered this fall will be used to track progress toward the state’s goal of increasing bicycling and walking in Washington and reducing the number of vehicle miles driven.
 
The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) and the Cascade Bicycle Club are enlisting volunteers and organizations like FeetFirst and the Bicycle Alliance of Washington to count the numbers of people bicycling and walking on paths, bike lanes, sidewalks, and other facilities on Sept. 29 and 30 and Oct. 1.
 

Gas prices and the recession can’t take all the credit for reduced congestion

OLYMPIA - Washington drivers are spending less time stuck in traffic despite growing vehicle volumes during peak commute periods in urban areas, according to a national study released to news media today. WSDOT's own data crunchers attribute the trend to the declining economy, but contend that smart transportation investments and operational strategies are what will keep travel times reasonable well after the economy recovers.  

The 2009 Urban Mobility Report, a national study released today by the Texas Transportation Institute, announces that congestion is declining or leveling off across the country, and attributes the cause to rising gas prices and the declining economy. WSDOT agrees that commutes are improving, but draws other conclusions as to the cause.