Tips sought in Aberdeen shooting that sends one to hospital, one to jail

Aberdeen police investigated a shooting this morning that sent one to the hospital, Police Captain John Green tells us at about 3 this morning they responded to reports of 4 to 5 people fighting at the Travel Lure Hotel on Wishkah Street. Arriving officers found evidence of a weapon being fired at the scene.
Green said a 37 year old Taholah male was located in a room and appeared to have gun shot wounds. The Aberdeen Fire Department treated and then transported the victim to the GH Community Hospital.

A Cosmopolis Officer that responded found a 17 year old Aberdeen man with a a concealed semi-automatic handgun, he was arrested on a bench warrant and taken to the Aberdeen Police Department. The handgun was seized.

Officers described three other men of interest as about 17 to 21 years of age, possibly Hispanic or Native American, described as wearing all black jackets, shorts, and baseball style hats.
They apparently fled right after the victim was shot, in a 1996 to 1999 Honda Accord with dark tinted windows and alloy wheels.

Aberdeen Detectives were called out and are continuing to process the scene, Wishkah Street in front of the Travel Lure was closed until about 7:00 A.M.

The investigation is continuing. Anyone with information is asked to call the Aberdeen Police Department at 533-3180 or the tip line at 538-4450.

Quinault Indian Nation to open Lake Quinault to regulated use

TAHOLAH, WA – The Quinault Indian Nation announced today they are reopening Lake Quinault to non-tribal use, under specified regulations and restrictions. President Fawn Sharp, said that since the lake was shut down in June of last year, to address pollution, invasive species and other issues, property and business owners in the area have spoken out in support of the Tribe’s actions, saying they appreciate the work being done by Quinault to protect the lake for future generations.

In a statement by the tribe Sharp said “Safeguarding our sacred lake for our children and for all the life it sustains is one of our highest priorities. If we can achieve those objectives, and share this precious resource with our non-tribal members, that’s what we will do. We believe it is time to try.”
Their Business Committee passed the Lake Quinault 2014 Fishing, Boating and Use Regulations Monday night, which covers usage of the lake for a one year period.

The press release added that the lake, up to the Ordinary High Water Mark, is located within the boundaries of the Quinault Indian Reservation. Violators of their regulations could result in confiscation of gear, and boats, as well as enforcement under the Quinault Tribal Code in the Quinault Tribal Court at Taholah.

 

FINAL Lake Quinault Regulations 04-14-14

Quinault Indian National says Taholah residents are safe

The Quinault Indian Nation says repair work is done on their seawall and residents are safe – for now, adding that with climate change their work is not done.
In a press release, President Fawn Sharp said the “Quinault Nation is very grateful to the U. S. Corps of Engineers and all the people, programs and agencies that pitched in to help achieve this. But the work is not done. The effects of climate change continue. The sea level continues to rise. Waves are higher and the storms are more intense.”

The recent $300,000 project used 100 dump trucks to place approximately 4500 tons of rock along the Taholah seawall just south of the Quinault River. The tribe said it was breached in late March by pounding waves and high winds, and declared an emergency for coastal flooding in the lower village of Taholah.

Sharp added “We have to keep working, together, to meet these challenges and find permanent solutions. The slide at Oso and the sea wall breaching at Quinault are just examples of the challenges we have yet to face here in the Northwest. It has fallen to us, in this generation, to meet those challenges with strength, courage and cooperation. Climate Change is an enormous problem—one we must work together to resolve.”

Army Corps. commences emergency repairs to Taholah seawall, heavy traffic expected

The U.S. Corps of Engineers has commenced work on the Quinault Indian Nation (QIN) sea wall and Quinault has issued an advisory that this will result in increased traffic from Aberdeen to Taholah along the ocean beach road and State Route 109 for the next 48 hours, according to QIN President Fawn Sharp.

More than 100 dump trucks are engaged in the project. “With clam digging this weekend and Quinault’s General Council meeting taking place, it is projected that there will be more than 1000 additional vehicles on the road already, so we advise people to drive with extreme caution,” said Sharp.

The Corps approved Quinault’s request for emergency assistance shortly after it concurred that an emergency situation exists, posing an imminent threat to the lives and safety of residents of the Lower Village of Taholah due to breaching of the seawall and encroachment of high waves and sea water.

High waves and winds are anticipated over the week end and the threat continues. “But it is important for people to remain calm and follow the instructions of our emergency workforce,” said President Sharp.

“We wish to acknowledge and thank the help of the Corps of Engineers as well as Grays Harbor Emergency Services, the elected officials and all others who have sent their prayers and offers of support. Our people will be kept safe and we will continue to seek a more long term solution to this dangerous situation,” said Sharp.

Quinault Nation Declares State of Emergency

Fawn Sharp, President of the Quinault Indian Nation, declared a state of emergency Tuesday night due to a breach in the Taholah seawall and destruction of a smokehouse, other outbuildings and properties in the lower village. The damage was caused by high waves and intense winds. A press release from the Tribe said Sharp is the Chief Executive Officer designated to possess constitutional authority to issue such direction for the Tribe.

President Sharp also issued a voluntary evacuation order in the area and filed a request with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) that the portion of Taholah in danger of being flooded and otherwise in danger from this situation be declared a federal disaster area and be made available for disaster support.

Sharp issued an executive order stating that “the dangerous condition continues and that the Taholah seawall is no longer capable of stopping the ocean from advancing into our lower village of Taholah.”

The executive order stated, “Lives as well as property are in imminent danger. A state of emergency exists in the tribal village of Taholah, on the Quinault Reservation.”

President Sharp met with congressional officials, including Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell and Congressmen Derek Kilmer and Dave Reichert as well as officials from the Army Corps earlier this month. “All of these officials were very supportive of our long term plans related to protection of our people from these ongoing dangerous conditions and the funding that will be required to achieve that protection on a permanent basis.”

Temporary mitigation efforts to reinforce the Taholah seawall were taken in January, when the Corps of Engineers placed 800 tons of riprap rock. “It is obvious that Quinault’s coastal defenses desperately require a more permanent fix,” said Sharp.

“We have been experiencing an increasingly dangerous situation with sea level rise and intensified storms. Our people must be protected. We will take whatever measures are necessary to see that they are,” said Sharp.

Taholah man airlifted after motorcycle hits schoolbus

A 27 year old Taholah man was airlifted to Harborview yesterday after his motorcycle collided with a school bus. The Washington State Patrol tells us he was riding with no helmet on the shoulder of Ocean View Drive North around 4:30 Monday when he lost control and ran into the school bus, which was stopped at an intersection. No injuries were reported from the bus driver, or the 15 children aboard at the time. The 27 year old was airlifted to Harborview Medical Center with undisclosed injuries. The State Patrol reports the accident is under investigation.

Taholah man dies in rollover wreck on State Route 109

A 38 year old Taholah man died early Saturday morning when his truck rolled off of State Route 109 in Moclips. The Washington State Patrol cites driving under the influence as the cause. Trevis Jones was pronounced dead at the scene, his passenger, a 47 year old Taholah man was transported to Community Hospital in Aberdeen with undisclosed injuries. Jones and his passenger were headed North on 109 when his 2012 Dodge truck left the road just after 2 Saturday morning, coming to rest on it’s top. The Washington State Department of Transportation reports the accident and investigation blocked traffic for about 2 hours.

Quinault Tribe challenges leadership, while leadership challenges U.S. President

QUINAULT, Wash. – The Quinault Indian Nation will vote on a recall of their President, Fawn Sharp and three other members of the tribal Business Committee next week. The tribe’s newspaper the Nugguam, states that “A petition to recall Sharp, along with Vice President Andrew Mail, Treasurer Larry Ralston and Secretary Latosha Underwood was signed by at least fifty (50) qualified voters and filed with the Quinault Business Committee.
Tribal members who have spearheaded the vote cite issues with money, land, and legal management of the nation. The special general council meeting will be held in the Taholah School gymnasium for “Enrolled Quinault Tribal Members Only” on Nov. 16 at 10 a.m. Registration will begin at 9:30 a.m.
 
Meanwhile Sharp plans to challenge U.S. President Barack Obama (and his administration) to keep his promises to American Indian Nations at his 5th annual meeting with hundreds of tribal leaders from across the country on November 13 in Washington D.C.. A press release from President Sharp said she will call for an intergovernmental dialogue to back up his often stated commitment to strengthen nation-to-nation relations.

High winds and multiple outages in Grays Harbor County

ABERDEEN, Wash. – The Grays Harbor PUD has restored power to portions of the Tokeland and Moclips/Tahola areas. Crews are responding to scattered outages across the county as well as large outages.  Power has been restored to all customers in Central Park as well.

Currently crews are responding to outages in the following locations:

There continues to be approximately 500 customers without power in the Moclips/Taholah area. 

There are still scattered outages in the county including Newskah Road, locations in Montesano, and the Elma airport.



There are currently two Active Alerts

ALERT 1 – High Surf Advisory

A HIGH SURF ADVISORY IS IN EFFECT UNTIL 5:00AM PDT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 03

Event Start: In Progress

Event End: Sunday, November 03, 2013 4:00 AM PST

Details

ALERT 2 – High Wind Warning

A HIGH WIND WARNING IS IN EFFECT UNTIL 9:00PM PDT SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 02

Event Start: In Progress

Event End: Saturday, November 02, 2013 8:00 PM PDT

Details

Washington

QIN: Potlatch’ing on at Hunishu Point

TAHOLAH, WA (8/5/13)—The Paddle to Quinault continues in its fifth of six days today, as tribal nation after tribal nation shares song and wisdom passed from generation-to-generation with a gathering of approximately 10,000 people gathered at the newly named Hunishu Point just south of Taholah on the Quinault Reservation.

 

On Sunday, 22-foot motorized canoes raced at the mouth of the Quinault River, in a demonstration worthy of two worlds coming together—that of the first peoples whose lives and legacies enrich the land and waters of the Pacific Northwest far beyond that of contemporary countries, and that of the automobile, jet plane and even the hydro-style boat races akin to Seattle’s Sea Fair.

 

Hunishu Point has been dedicated to Quinault elder Phillip Martin Sr., the Quinault elder who in 1989 captained a crew of women pullers (paddlers) in a cedar canoe from Quinault to the Paddle to Seattle—the first of the modern canoe journeys. Since then, the construction of the beautiful, traditional cedar canoes has been resurrected among the tribes of the Northwest, and beyond, and the paddles have become annual events. Participants have come from Oregon, California, Idaho, Alaska, California, Washington and other states, including Hawaii, Canada and even New Zealand. As the potlatch draws to a close tomorrow, the final words and songs will be shared by the Bella Bella First Nation of Canada (host of next year’s paddle) and the Quinault Indian Nation.

 

Hunishu is Martin’s Indian name, meaning “Elk That Thunders.”

 

This year’s Paddle to Quinault attracted a total of 89 of the 30 foot plus canoes to the Quinault Reservation. Most arrived Wednesday, and the tribal potlatch has been in full swing ever since. Tomorrow is the final day. The public is invited. More information on the event is available at www.PaddletoQuinault.org