Local projects among 70 statewide, proposed $202 million in loans/grants to protect Washington waters

The Washington Department of Ecology proposes to spend $202 million in dedicated grants and loans to help pay for 70 local projects across the state to protect the health of Washington waters. Included is a low interest loan for a new waste water collection system in the Oyehut/Illahee area that will eliminate 130 existing on-site sewage systems, as well as a loan to replace the outfall diffuser at the City of Aberdeen’s waste water treatment plant. There is also a proposed loan to complete the Shelton Basin 3 Sewer Rehabilitation Construction Project.The funding is contingent on a final state supplemental budget and final federal appropriations. It becomes available at the start of the state’s next fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014.

 
State financial managers calculate that 11 jobs in Washington are created for every $1 million spent for construction and design funding. That would make this proposed round of funding support more than 2,200 jobs. Over half of these are likely to be local construction jobs.
 
The funding will be directed to water protection on agricultural lands; upgrades and expansions of sewer plants and collection systems; septic system improvements; water protection and cleanup projects; efforts to manage stormwater; streamside restoration projects; and more.
 
Here are highlights of the proposed funding:
 
Port Angeles, Spokane, and King County are proposed to receive $62 million in Revolving Fund loans to correct combined sewer overflows (CSOs). CSOs are discharges of untreated sewage that overflow directly to nearby streams, lakes, and harbors when wastewater collection systems are overloaded by large stormwater flows.
 
Ecology proposes $1.1 million in grants for projects on both sides of the Cascades to protect clean water on agricultural lands. Of this funding:
  • The Palouse Rock Lake Conservation District proposes to enhance streamside areas of the Palouse River and create cost-share programs for no-till, direct seed programs.
  • Okanogan Conservation District wants to implement practices to help landowners protect waters from livestock access.
  • Benton Conservation District proposes to work with the public to understand and prevent nitrate pollution of drinking water.
  • Lewis County Conservation District plans to work on a project to prevent polluted runoff from irrigation practices.
  • In King County, American Farmland Trust plans to field-test strategies to improve water quality in farm areas along Newaukum Creek. 
 
In addition, $190 million is proposed to boost 39 wastewater treatment facility projects. Eight of these are proposed for communities that qualify for financial hardship status. They will receive grants, forgivable principal loans (loans that do not need to be paid back), and loans with interest rates as low as zero percent. The communities are:
  • Chehalis
  • Deer Park
  • Ilwaco
  • Morton
  • Sacheen Lake area of Pend Oreille County
  • Sun Acres in Spokane County
  • Shelton
  • Illayee/Oyehut area in Grays Harbor County
 
Project descriptions and proposed funding amounts can be found online
 
Ecology invites comments about this proposed funding. Email comments to Daniel Thompson at daniel.thompson@ecy.wa.gov or mail them to Department of Ecology, Water Quality Program, P.O. Box 47600, Olympia, WA 98504-7600, Attn: Daniel Thompson. Comments must be received by 5 p.m. March 24, 2014.
 
Ecology will hold a public meeting to discuss the proposed list at 1 p.m., Friday, March 7, at the Pierce County Library, PAC – Processing and Administrative Center, 3005 112th Street in Tacoma.
 
The funding is contingent on a final state supplemental budget and final federal appropriations. It becomes available at the start of the state’s next fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014.
 
Funding for Ecology’s integrated loan and grant program comes from a combination of dedicated state and federal monies.
 
Of the $202 million total, $180 million comes from the Washington State Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund. Another $20.3 million comes from the state Centennial Clean Water Program. And $1.6 million comes from the Clean Water Section 319 Nonpoint Source Fund. Read more about these funds and where the money comes from online.   

Flu hits peak levels in Washington State

OLYMPIA — The flu has reached its peak, and 19 lab-confirmed flu deaths have been reported across the state since December. Only lab-confirmed flu deaths are reportable in the state, and many cases aren’t lab tested, so the actual toll of flu is likely higher.

“The flu can be a serious disease,” said Dr. Kathy Lofy, interim state health officer. “People of all ages can get very sick. Getting vaccinated is the best protection and can help people avoid severe illness, hospitalization, and even death.”

The virus is widespread in Washington. Most confirmed flu cases across the nation and in our state have been the 2009 H1N1 strain, which is covered by this season’s flu vaccine. A flu vaccination is recommended for everyone six months and older. It’s especially important for people at high risk for complications from flu, including young children, pregnant women, people 65 and older, and people with certain medical conditions — such as asthma, heart disease, diabetes, and neurologic conditions.

Nationally, estimates from November showed that less than 40 percent of the population had been vaccinated against flu, leaving a lot of people unprotected. To best protect people and communities from flu, 80 percent or more must be vaccinated — that’s the national goal.

The state health department produced a public service announcement and online ads with Washington families talking about why they get a flu shot and encouraging others to do so. The statewide flu prevention ads will run online, on the radio, and in social media through February. Radio ads will air on stations in the Seattle, Vancouver, Spokane, Yakima, and Tri-Cities areas.

Produced public service announcements and other flu resources and materials can be found on the Department of Health flu news Web pages.

If you haven’t gotten your flu vaccine, now is the time. It takes two weeks after vaccination to be protected. We expect flu to circulate in our state for several more weeks. Kids under nine years old may need two doses about a month apart. You can get vaccinated at many locations, including health care provider offices, pharmacies, and some local health agencies. Check the flu vaccine finder to find out where to get flu vaccine in your community.

Many people with flu have a fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose, body aches, and fatigue. Antiviral medication can help. It must be prescribed by a doctor and it works best if started within two days of getting sick. It’s especially important for persons at high risk for flu complications to start treatment right away.

The Washington State Department of Health buys flu vaccine for all kids through age 18. Kids can get the vaccine from their regular health care provider. Providers may charge an office visit fee and an administration fee to give the vaccine. People who can’t afford the administration fee can ask to have it waived.

The Department of Health website (doh.wa.gov) is your source for a healthy dose of information. Also, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Pinpoint Radon risks down to the zip code with new Dept. of Health app

OLYMPIA ¾ Washington residents now have a new online map to check and see if their neighborhood has a geological risk for the cancer-causing gas, radon, using a new state app. The new app is offered by the state Department of Health’s Washington Tracking Network.

Some areas of the state, such as Spokane and Clark counties, are well-known for having higher levels of radon, but the new online map shows that there some areas around the Puget Sound such as Pierce and King counties that might come as a surprise.

In areas with historically higher radon levels, testing happens routinely, giving homeowners more information about those areas. But many areas of the state at risk for radon haven’t been as thoroughly tested, or tested at all. More testing would provide a better understanding of the scope of radon risks throughout the state.

Radon is a colorless, odorless radioactive gas created when uranium in rocks decays. When this gas enters a building from the ground or through construction materials or well water, it becomes trapped and builds up. It’s important to know how much radon you and your family are exposed to since long-term exposure to radon is known to cause lung cancer. The risk of lung cancer to smokers who are also exposed to elevated- radon levels increases even more.

Radon testing is the only way to know if you’re being exposed. Every home should be tested even if it’s located in a low-risk area. If high levels of radon are found, fixing it is usually simple and inexpensive. Home-testing kits are available at most hardware stores and certified radon professionals are available to help homeowners who have radon levels above safety levels.

Local radon and smoking information is available on the Washington Tracking Network’s website, your source for environmental public health data.

More about reducing radon levels in homes is available on the Department of Health’s Radon Program website and the Environmental Protection Agency website. State residents who want help quitting tobacco can find information online or by calling Washington’s Tobacco Quitline at 1-800-Quit-Now.

The Department of Health website (doh.wa.gov) is your source for a healthy dose of information. Also, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Celebrate New Year’s Day with a hike at Lake Sylvia State park

MONTESANO, Wash. – The 3rd Annual “First Hike” will hit the Lake Sylvia trails at 1 P.M. this Wednesday. Remember to bring your Discover Pass for all day parking, or carpool to the 2.5-mile hike along Sylvia Creek in Montesano.

Background photo with fall leaves and sun shining through the trees, envelope with Discover Pass graphic, State Parks logo and text: Washington State Parks, Discover Pass, the gift everyone will enjoy year-round! Now select any start date! Information Center: (360) 339-8136. Purchase online at: discoverpass.reachlocal.net

Nice dogs on leashes are allowed, the event is sponsored by the Friends of Schafer and Lake Sylvia State Parks group.

“First Day Hikes are a great way for families and individuals to enjoy, appreciate and support their Washington state parks,” said Don Hoch, Washington State Parks director. “We’re thrilled to participate in this nationwide effort that encourages Americans to get outdoors from the very beginning of the new year. This is a way that families can create a new memorable New Year’s Day tradition.”

Hikes are Washington state parks are scheduled as follows. Participants of all ages are welcome, unless otherwise noted:

Cama Beach State Park on Camano Island: Discover winter flora and fauna on Camano Island, and enjoy views of Saratoga Passage during a 1.5-mile hike. Meet at the welcome center near the park entrance at 1 p.m. A free shuttle is available to return hikers to the Cama Beach State Park welcome center after the event.

Camano Island State Park on Camano Island: Hike on West Rim and Cross Island trails at 1 p.m. for a two-mile trek from Camano Island State Park to Cama Beach State Park. Meet at the Lowell Point kitchen shelter. A free shuttle is available to return hikers to Camano Island State Park after the event.

Deception Pass State Park in Oak Harbor: Participants have two hiking options at Deception Pass. Hike out to North Beach on Discovery Trail at 10 a.m. Then either return on the same trail for a two-mile hike, or continue to Goose Rock Trail for a view of Strawberry and Ben Ure islands on a three-mile trek. The hike starts at Cornet Bay Retreat Center; meet there at 10 a.m.

Ebey’s Landing State Park on Whidbey Island: Explore Bluff Trail at Ebey’s Landing State Park within the Ebey’s Landing National Historic Reserve. Meet at 10 a.m., at the picnic tables just beyond the parking lot on the way to the trailhead. Participants of all ages are welcome, though small children may need assistance. On-leash pets are allowed.

Fort Flagler State Park on Marrowstone Island: Hike a full two miles along Bluff Trail, or enjoy a shorter, ¾-mile walk that includes views of North Puget Sound and historic military structures. Meet at 1 p.m. in front of the park museum. On-leash pets are welcome. The park museum is open on New Year’s Day.

Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend: Take a stroll up Artillery Hill and walk through multiple coastal defense bunkers for a 1.5-mile hike. Meet at 12:30 p.m. at the “Memories Vault. Those unfamiliar with the park may wish to arrive 30 minutes early and ask for directions at the Coastal Artillery Museum, located next door to the park office. Children ages 10 years and older are welcome. Those who want to explore the bunkers are advised to take along a flashlight.

Goldendale Observatory State Park in Goldendale: This event starts with an evening hike, followed by a stargazing session in the Observatory, led by the park’s interpretive specialist. Meet at 6:30 p.m. in the state park parking lot. Pets on leash are welcome.

Lake Sylvia State Park in Montesano: Hike along Sylvia Creek/Forestry Trail while learning about area logging history, wildlife and plant life. Meet at 1 p.m., at the day-use area parking lot. On-leash pets are welcome.

Lake Wenatchee State Park near Leavenworth: Snowshoe on North Lake Loop for a one-mile excursion of moderate difficulty. Meet at 10 a.m. at the North Park Sno-Park. A Seasonal Sno-Park Permit and a Special Groomed Trail Permit – or a One-Day Sno-Park Permit and Discover Pass – are required for vehicle access to this event. Sno-Park permits are available for purchase online at parkswa.reachlocal.net/winter. Participants must be 10 years of age or older to participate. Please leave pets at home. Snowshoes are required.

Millersylvania State Park in Olympia: Walk or run 3.8 miles of fitness trails through Pacific Northwest old-growth forest. Meet at 9 a.m. at Kitchen Shelter 1. Participants are asked to leave pets at home for this one.

Mount Spokane State Park in Mead: Snowshoe along Trail 130 for a 2- to 4-mile, round-trip hike. Meet at 10 a.m. at the snowmobile parking lot. A Seasonal Sno-Park Permit and a Special Groomed Trail Permit or a One-Day Sno-Park Permit and a Discover Pass are required for vehicle access to the event. (Purchase Sno-Park permits online at parkswa.reachlocal.net/winter/) Snowshoes are required, and pets are allowed, as long as they are on leash.

Nolte State Park in Enumclaw: Explore the forested 1.25-mile-loop around Deep Lake at this 11 a.m. hike through the Green River Gorge. Meet at the state park parking lot. On-leash pets are welcome.

Riverside State Park in Spokane: Take the swing bridge over the Spokane River for a hike on the Bowl and Pitcher River Trail. Participants will see the unique basalt rock formations cut by the Spokane River known as the Bowl and Pitcher. Meet in the Bowl and Pitcher Swinging Bridge parking lot at 1 p.m. Participants should be prepared for any weather conditions; snowshoes may be required. Pets on leash are allowed.

Twanoh State Park on Hood Canal: See the interior of a Puget Sound coastal forest on a 2.25-mile hike. Meet at 9:30 a.m. at the park office in the lower parking area. The trail may be muddy; boots or weather-proof shoes are recommended.

Wallace Falls State Park in Goldbar: Hike on Woody Trail to Middle Falls for a 2.3-mile journey to multiple waterfall viewpoints. Meet at 11 a.m. at the Wallace Falls Trailhead. Pets on leash are welcome.

For more information about specific First Day Hikes at Washington state parks, visit parkswa.reachlocal.net/events. The First Day Hikes program is part of the America’s State Parks First Day Hikes national initiative organized by the National Association of State Park Directors. The nationwide event first started at Blue Hills Reservation, a state park in Milton, Mass., more than 20 years ago. The National Association of State Park Directors and America’s State Parks strives to promote and advance the state park systems of American for their own significance, as well as for their important contributions to the nation’s environment, heritage, health and economy. For a second year in a row, all 50 state park systems are participating in the First Day Hikes program. For more information about hikes across the country, visit www.americasstateparks.org.

Stay connected to your state parks by following Washington State Parks at www.facebook.com/WashingtonStateParks, www.twitter.com/WAStatePks, www.youtube.com/WashingtonStateParks and www.foursquare.com/WAStatePks. Share your favorite state park adventure on the State Parks’ blog site at www.AdventureAwaits.com.

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission manages a diverse system of more than 100 state parks and recreation programs, including long-distance trails, boating safety and winter recreation.

Support state parks by purchasing your annual Discover Pass today, and enjoy a whole year of outdoor fun on Washington’s beautiful state-managed recreation lands. For more information, visit discoverpass.reachlocal.net.

Celebrate New Year’s Day with a Washington state park hike

Hikes are Washington state parks are scheduled as follows. Participants of all ages are welcome, unless otherwise noted:

• Cama Beach State Park on Camano Island: Discover winter flora and fauna on Camano Island, and enjoy views of Saratoga Passage during a 1.5-mile hike. Meet at the welcome center near the park entrance at 1 p.m. A free shuttle is available to return hikers to the Cama Beach State Park welcome center after the event. 

• Camano Island State Park on Camano Island: Hike on West Rim and Cross Island trails at 1 p.m. for a two-mile trek from Camano Island State Park to Cama Beach State Park. Meet at the Lowell Point kitchen shelter. A free shuttle is available to return hikers to Camano Island State Park after the event.

• Deception Pass State Park in Oak Harbor: Participants have two hiking options at Deception Pass. Hike out to North Beach on Discovery Trail at 10 a.m. Then either return on the same trail for a two-mile hike, or continue to Goose Rock Trail for a view of Strawberry and Ben Ure islands on a three-mile trek. The hike starts at Cornet Bay Retreat Center; meet there at 10 a.m. 

• Ebey’s Landing State Park on Whidbey Island: Explore Bluff Trail at Ebey’s Landing State Park within the Ebey’s Landing National Historic Reserve. Meet at 10 a.m., at the picnic tables just beyond the parking lot on the way to the trailhead. Participants of all ages are welcome, though small children may need assistance. On-leash pets are allowed.

• Fort Flagler State Park on Marrowstone Island: Hike a full two miles along Bluff Trail, or enjoy a shorter, ¾-mile walk that includes views of North Puget Sound and historic military structures. Meet at 1 p.m. in front of the park museum. On-leash pets are welcome. The park museum is open on New Year’s Day.

• Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend: Take a stroll up Artillery Hill and walk through multiple coastal defense bunkers for a 1.5-mile hike. Meet at 12:30 p.m. at the “Memories Vault. Those unfamiliar with the park may wish to arrive 30 minutes early and ask for directions at the Coastal Artillery Museum, located next door to the park office. Children ages 10 years and older are welcome. Those who want to explore the bunkers are advised to take along a flashlight. 

• Goldendale Observatory State Park in Goldendale: This event starts with an evening hike, followed by a stargazing session in the Observatory, led by the park’s interpretive specialist. Meet at 6:30 p.m. in the state park parking lot. Pets on leash are welcome. 

• Lake Sylvia State Park in Montesano: Hike along Sylvia Creek/Forestry Trail while learning about area logging history, wildlife and plant life. Meet at 1 p.m., at the day-use area parking lot. On-leash pets are welcome. 

• Lake Wenatchee State Park near Leavenworth: Snowshoe on North Lake Loop for a one-mile excursion of moderate difficulty. Meet at 10 a.m. at the North Park Sno-Park. A Seasonal Sno-Park Permit and a Special Groomed Trail Permit – or a One-Day Sno-Park Permit and Discover Pass – are required for vehicle access to this event. Sno-Park permits are available for purchase online at www.parks.wa.gov/winter. Participants must be 10 years of age or older to participate. Please leave pets at home. Snowshoes are required.

• Millersylvania State Park in Olympia: Walk or run 3.8 miles of fitness trails through Pacific Northwest old-growth forest. Meet at 9 a.m. at Kitchen Shelter 1. Participants are asked to leave pets at home for this one. 

• Mount Spokane State Park in Mead: Snowshoe along Trail 130 for a 2- to 4-mile, round-trip hike. Meet at 10 a.m. at the snowmobile parking lot. A Seasonal Sno-Park Permit and a Special Groomed Trail Permit or a One-Day Sno-Park Permit and a Discover Pass are required for vehicle access to the event. (Purchase Sno-Park permits online at www.parks.wa.gov/winter/) Snowshoes are required, and pets are allowed, as long as they are on leash.

• Nolte State Park in Enumclaw: Explore the forested 1.25-mile-loop around Deep Lake at this 11 a.m. hike through the Green River Gorge. Meet at the state park parking lot. On-leash pets are welcome. 

• Riverside State Park in Spokane: Take the swing bridge over the Spokane River for a hike on the Bowl and Pitcher River Trail. Participants will see the unique basalt rock formations cut by the Spokane River known as the Bowl and Pitcher. Meet in the Bowl and Pitcher Swinging Bridge parking lot at 1 p.m. Participants should be prepared for any weather conditions; snowshoes may be required. Pets on leash are allowed. 

• Twanoh State Park on Hood Canal: See the interior of a Puget Sound coastal forest on a 2.25-mile hike. Meet at 9:30 a.m. at the park office in the lower parking area. The trail may be muddy; boots or weather-proof shoes are recommended. 

• Wallace Falls State Park in Goldbar: Hike on Woody Trail to Middle Falls for a 2.3-mile journey to multiple waterfall viewpoints. Meet at 11 a.m. at the Wallace Falls Trailhead. Pets on leash are welcome. 

For more information about specific First Day Hikes at Washington state parks, visit www.parks.wa.gov/events. The First Day Hikes program is part of the America’s State Parks First Day Hikes national initiative organized by the National Association of State Park Directors. The nationwide event first started at Blue Hills Reservation, a state park in Milton, Mass., more than 20 years ago. The National Association of State Park Directors and America’s State Parks strives to promote and advance the state park systems of American for their own significance, as well as for their important contributions to the nation’s environment, heritage, health and economy. For a second year in a row, all 50 state park systems are participating in the First Day Hikes program. For more information about hikes across the country, visit www.americasstateparks.org. 

Stay connected to your state parks by following Washington State Parks at www.facebook.com/WashingtonStateParks, www.twitter.com/WAStatePks, www.youtube.com/WashingtonStateParks and www.foursquare.com/WAStatePks. Share your favorite state park adventure on the State Parks’ blog site at www.AdventureAwaits.com.

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission manages a diverse system of more than 100 state parks and recreation programs, including long-distance trails, boating safety and winter recreation. 

Support state parks by purchasing your annual Discover Pass today, and enjoy a whole year of outdoor fun on Washington’s beautiful state-managed recreation lands. For more information, visit www.discoverpass.wa.gov.

United Way announces distributions sites for Coat & Blanket Drive

ABERDEEN, Wash. – Community Distribution Sites for the 2013 Coat & Blanket Drive by the United Way/Les Schwab will open on Nov 5. All locations will be open Tuesday, November 5th from 10 am – 3:00 pm. Families, children and individuals in need are welcome to go to the following locations to get a coat or blanket at no charge while supplies last. 

Aberdeen

Harbor City Church

1700 Cherry Street

Hoquiam

Hoquiam Library

420 7th St

Montesano

Simpson School, RM #22

519 W Simpson Ave

Elma

Elma Senior Center

100 W Main St

Ocean Shores

Church of Latter Day Saints

228 Albatross St

Westport

South Beach Fire & EMS

170 W Spokane St

 

United Way is working directly with elementary schools in our area to deliver coats and new tennis shoes to  the demand is overwhelming as many children are wearing shoes that no longer fit or are so worn that their feet are getting soaked.  We are still looking to fill those school ‘wish lists’. We will need 200 children’s coats and almost 300 pairs of new children’s tennis shoes to meet the need.

 

Donations are being accepted until Oct 31, there are boxes at many participating merchants including all Les Schwab, Dennis Company, Anchor Bank and Timberland Bank locations, Jodesha Broadcasting, Grays Harbor Radio and the Daily World .

For more information or to make a cash donation call United Way at 360.532.6260

State disciplines health care providers

Cowlitz County

 

In August 2013 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program ended probation for chemical dependency professional trainee and chemical dependency professional Amber D. Myers, also known as Amber Dawn Flowers (CO60156633, CP60264413).

 

Grant County

 

In August 2013 the Nursing Commission amended a statement of charges against the credential of registered nurse Gina L. Goodwin (RN00097130) to remove the name of her son, whom she allegedly involved in a scheme to get fraudulently prescribed drugs.

 

Grays Harbor County

 

In August 2013 the Osteopathic Board ended probation for osteopathic physician John Evan Eiland (OP00001933).

 

King County

 

In July 2013 the Nursing Assistant Program denied a certified nursing assistant credential to Somsanith Rattanavong (NC60298772). On his application, Rattanavong gave false answers about his criminal history and about restrictions on his health care privileges.

 

In August 2013 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program entered an agreement with Derek Shea Utrup (CO60338644) that granted him a chemical dependency professional trainee credential and placed him on probation for at least three years. In 2000 Utrup was convicted of third-degree child molestation. Twice in 2010 he was convicted of driving while intoxicated.

 

In August 2013 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program conditionally granted a chemical dependency professional credential to Seth Patrick Welch (CP60344745). In 2011 Welch entered an agreement placing terms and conditions on his chemical dependency professional trainee credential.

 

In August 2013 the Nursing Assistant Program conditionally granted registered nursing assistant and certified nursing assistant credentials to Janelle Alene Wallace (NA60393202, NC60393687), who must abide by a 2012 agreement that placed her chemical dependency professional trainee credential on probation for three years.

 

In August 2013 the Nursing Commission charged registered nurse Forson Addae-Boateng (RN00162766) with unprofessional conduct. Addae-Boateng operated a school that trained nursing assistants. He allegedly provided fewer hours of instruction than were required and issued certificates of completion to students who didn’t meet minimum requirements.

 

In August 2013 the Nursing Commission charged registered nurse Patricia Marie Bursch (RN00058788) with unprofessional conduct. Bursch’s 84-year-old mother, who had dementia, went to live with Bursch after having surgery. Bursch allegedly wrote checks to herself from her mother’s trust and retirement accounts without the knowledge of her mother’s power of attorney. The Department of Social and Health Services found Bursch exploited and financially exploited a vulnerable adult. In 2013 she was convicted of second-degree theft.

 

In August 2013 the Dental Commission charged dental assistant Melanie Ann D’Arielli-Webb (D160314769) with unprofessional conduct. She allegedly forged eight prescriptions for controlled substances using prescription pads stolen from her employer.

 

In August 2013 the Medical Commission entered an agreement granting an early end to probation for physician Marco A. Sobrino (MD00039788).

 

In August 2013 the Medical Commission entered an agreement with physician Michael A. Leff (MD00014429) that placed his credential on probation for at least two years. Leff may not treat family members except in emergencies, may not have opiods at his medical office, must complete ethics and record-keeping courses, and must pay a $2,000 fine. Leff, a board-certified plastic surgeon, treated his wife for frequent and severe headaches, violating appropriate physician-patient boundaries. His care didn’t meet the standard in the use of controlled substances and in record-keeping.

 

In August 2013 the Dental Commission conditionally granted a dental assistant credential to Fatima Lanette Mitchell (D160329390). In 2007 Mitchell was convicted of attempting to obtain Vicodin by means of false or forged prescription. In 2008 she was convicted of attempted possession of a controlled substance. In 2011 she was convicted of residential burglary.

 

Kitsap County

 

In August 2013 the Medical Commission ended conditions in an agreement with physician Lois S. Bresaw (MD00024914).

 

Lewis County

 

In August 2013 the Nursing Assistant Program ended probation for registered nursing assistant and certified nursing assistant Jeremy James Veigel (NA60256354, NC60266659).

 

Pierce County

 

In August 2013 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program conditionally granted a chemical dependency professional trainee credential to Michael Dean Bateman (CO60344761). Bateman must complete the five-year probation and other conditions imposed in an October 2011 order.

In August 2013 the Medical Commission filed an amended statement of charges against physician Gregory Brammer (MD00037500) to correct a file number in the charging papers.

 

Skagit County

 

In August 2013 the Medical Commission ended conditions on the credential of physician Charles G. Blackadar (MD00037686), who may now practice without restrictions.

 

Snohomish County

 

In August 2013 the Podiatric Board charged podiatric physician Michael B. Riojas (PO00000735) with unprofessional conduct. Riojas allegedly provided inadequate treatment and follow-up care to a patient on whom he performed surgery.

 

Spokane County

 

In August 2013 the Nursing Assistant Program charged registered nursing assistant Mary Jeanette Potts (NA00164482) with unprofessional conduct. Potts allegedly yelled at a patient who had Parkinson’s disease and refused to care for her when she was shaking. Potts allegedly yelled at a second patient and allowed her son to mistreat the patient. The Department of Social and Health Services will not allow her to be employed in caring for and having unsupervised access to vulnerable adults.

In August 2013 the Nursing Assistant Program charged registered nursing assistant Nicole Annmarie Thompson (NA60247800) with unprofessional conduct. In 2013 Thompson was convicted of second-degree assault. She hasn’t responded to a Department of Health inquiry about the conviction.

 

Thurston County

 

In August 2013 the Unlicensed Practice Program notified Sun Qiang of its intent to issue a cease-and-desist order. Qiang, who has no massage credential, allegedly admitted to a Department of Health investigator that he and his spouse performed massage and reflexology at businesses they own.

 

In August 2013 the Unlicensed Practice Program notified Hui Ying Yan of its intent to issue a cease-and-desist order. Yan, who has no massage credential, allegedly admitted to a Department of Health investigator that she and her spouse performed massage and reflexology at businesses they own.

 

Whatcom County

 

In August 2013 the Nursing Commission charged registered nurse Thadeus Leah Snider (RN60025385) with unprofessional conduct. In 2013 Snider pleaded guilty to third-degree assault. He allegedly didn’t report the conviction to the Nursing Commission.

 

Out of State

 

Alaska: In August 2013 the Physical Therapy Board charged physical therapy assistant Seanna Elizabeth Bryson (P160040949) with unprofessional conduct. Bryson allegedly didn’t comply with a previous agreement.

 

Maryland: In August 2013 the Medical Commission entered an agreement with physician John L. Young (MD60187941) in which he agrees not to renew his license or to apply for one in the future. The Maryland Board of Physicians suspended Young’s credential to practice in that state.

 

Oregon: In August 2013 the Nursing Assistant Program ended probation for certified nursing assistant Tori Kiah Wogar Summers (NC60200547).

 

Note to Editors: Health care providers charged with unprofessional conduct have 20 days to respond to the Department of Health in writing. The case then enters the settlement process. If no disciplinary agreement can be reached, the case will go to a hearing.

The Department of Health website (www.doh.wa.gov) is your source for a healthy dose of information. Also, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Cantwell, FAA Announce Groundbreaking Hub to Launch New Era in Jet Biofuels Development

Cantwell, Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) and the entire Washington delegation sent a letter to the FAA in April supporting WSU’s proposal.

Cantwell wrote language to create the new FAA Center of Excellence in the FAA reauthorization bill of 2012. The announcement marks a major FAA long-term public-private investment in jet biofuel research, with the new Center of Excellence in Alternative Jet Fuels and Environment funded at $40 million over the next 10 years. It will be matched 1-to-1 with $40 million from industry partners.

The coalition of 16 universities and 26 industry and federal partners and stakeholders includes numerous members in Washington state: the University of Washington, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Alaska Airlines, Boeing, Weyerhaeuser, the Port of Seattle, Spokane International Airport, Imperium Renewables and InnovaTek.

“As the longtime home of our nation’s aerospace industry, Washington state has always been on the cutting edge of new technology that makes American planes better, safer, and more efficient, and I’m thrilled Washington State University will continue that proud tradition as home for the new Air Transportation Center of Excellence for alternate jet fuels and the environment,” said Senator Patty Murray. “Developing new alternative jet fuels is crucial for the airline industry, our military, and our environment, and the FAA made the right decision to base this important research where it belongs, in Washington state.”

As the Chair of the Senate Appropriations Transportation Subcommittee, Senator Murray has fought to include funding for the Air Transportation Center of Excellence in the Senate spending bill two years in row. Throughout the selection process, Senator Murray spoke directly with FAA Administrator Huerta several times to advocate on behalf of WSU’s application.

For more than a decade, WSU has provided technical leadership to the Pacific Northwest region and to the nation in alternative fuels for aircraft. The WSU team will focus on feedstock development, sustainable forest production and establishing new methods to identify the most promising plant lines for biofuel conversion.

“Washington state is already the aerospace capital of the world,” said Rep. Rick Larsen, WA-02, the top Democrat on the House Aviation Subcommittee. “This national center of excellence will put people to work making our state the base for innovation that will reshape aviation in the 21st century. The center will combine our state’s unmatched strength in aviation engineering with our unrivaled commitment to protecting the environment.”

The top 40 airports around the country use approximately 90 percent of America’s jet fuel. The Center will coordinate a regional approach to meet the needs of different hubs across the country. WSU and the other universities chosen as partners have expertise and experience with woody biomass feedstocks of native trees to their respective regions.

“We thank Senator Maria Cantwell for her leadership in making the FAA Center of Excellence a reality. It’s terrific win for Washington State University and the Pacific Northwest, and it further validates our region as the leader in the development of sustainable aviation biofuel,” said Mike Bair, Vice President of Marketing and Business Development for Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “State-of-the-art research conducted by the Center of Excellence will advance the commercialization of aviation biofuel. This fuel will play a crucial role in supporting our industry’s long-term growth while reducing its carbon emissions.”

“Airlines for America is a strong proponent of increasing our nation’s energy security and developing sustainable alternative aviation fuels,” said Nicholas E. Calio, President and CEO of Airlines for America. “We applaud the efforts of Sen. Cantwell, who is a longtime advocate for jet biofuels and their potential for the aviation sector.”

“We are thrilled to learn the FAA has selected Washington State University to lead the Center of Excellence, and we thank Senator Cantwell for her leadership in making this possible. With this investment, our region will continue to play a critical role in advancing the development of aviation biofuels,” said Keith Loveless, Alaska Air Group’s executive vice president and general counsel and executive sponsor of Alaska’s sustainability program. “Using sustainable aviation fuels reflects our commitment to be the industry leader in environmental stewardship.”

“Washington state is poised to lead the nation is tackling this critical scientific challenge,” Cantwell continued. “Biofuel research brings together Washington state’s leaders in aviation, innovation and agriculture. This Center will propel Washington state’s innovation economy to the forefront of the emerging biofuels industry.”

WSU President Elson S. Floyd said that “competing for and winning the Center of Excellence designation reaffirms the State of Washington and Washington State University as international leaders in aviation and the development of alternative jet fuels. We, along with our university and industry partners, stand ready to deliver the new science, advanced technology and educated workforce the industry will need to be globally competitive. I especially want to thank Sens. Cantwell and Murray, and our entire Congressional delegation for their support of our proposal for the center designation.”

“The airlines are looking for ways to reduce their greenhouse gas footprint, and this center of excellence will play a big role in doing just that,” said John Holladay, manager of the Biomass Sector at PNNL.

Washington state is home to leaders in the research, development and use of aviation biofuels. Notable successes include:
In July 2010, Boeing, Alaska Airlines, the operators of the region’s three largest airports – Port of Seattle, Port of Portland and Spokane International Airport, and Washington State University launched Sustainable Aviation Fuels Northwest. The coalition is the nation’s first regional stakeholder effort to explore the opportunities of aviation biofuels.
In September 2011, a research team led by WSU received a $40 million USDA grant to convert closed timber mills into bioenergy development centers. The UW also received a $40 million USDA grant to research the use of sustainably grown woody energy crops to produce bio-gasoline and renewable aviation fuel.
In November 2011, Alaska Air conducted 75 commercial flights over a two-week period in which each plane used a 20 percent mixture of aviation biofuel.

Cantwell, along with Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), introduced legislation in May 2011 to extend the length of contracts between the Department of Defense and biofuel producers from the current limit of 5 years to 15 years. Allowing for longer-term contracts with the largest single consumer of energy in the country would help companies in Washington state to obtain the financing they need to grow their operations.

Aberdeen to Consider Transportation Benefit District, Forever Alone

Local transportation benefit district fees

A law passed in 2007 allows city or county governments to create local transportation benefit districts and impose a local vehicle registration fee to fund local transportation projects.

Transportation benefit districts and fees

If you live in any of the following locations, you must pay an additional local transportation benefit district fee when you renew your vehicle tabs:

District Fee Effective date
(Tabs expiring on or after…)
Location code Contact phone
Bremerton $20 July 1, 2012 18-01 360-473-5920
Burien No. 1 $10 February 1, 2011 17-34 206-241-4647
Des Moines $20 September 1, 2009 17-09 206-870-7586
City of Eatonville $20 March 1, 2013 27-05 360-832-3361
Edmonds $20 September 1, 2009 31-04 425-771-0260
Grandview $20 February 1, 2012 39-01 509-882-9200
City of Kittitas $20 December 1, 2012 19-03 509-968-0220
Lake Forest Park $20 September 1, 2009 17-17 206-368-5440
Lynnwood $20 July 1, 2011 31-10 425-670-5020
Mabton $20 December 1, 2011 39-04 509-894-4096
Mountlake Terrace $20 August 1, 2012 31-13 425-744-6272
Olympia $20 October 1, 2009 34-03 360-570-3727
City of Orting $20 February 1, 2013–
January 31, 2015
(Fee applies to all renewals with these registration dates, including renewals paid after Feb. 31, 2015.)
27-10 360-892-2219, ext. 133
Prosser $20 November 1, 2009 03-03 509-786-2332
Royal City $20 November 1, 2012 13-11 509-346-2263
Seattle $20 May 1, 2011 17-26 206-233-5005
Shoreline $20 February 1, 2010 17-37 206-801-2302
Snoqualmie $20 March 1, 2011 17-28 425-888-1555, Ext. 1135
City of Spokane $20 September 1, 2011 32-10 509-625-6252
Toppenish $20 December 1, 2012 39-10 509-865-4500
Wapato $20 April 1, 2013 39-12 509-877-2334
Wenatchee $20 August 1, 2012 04-05 509-888-3600
Zillah $20 July 1, 2012 39-14 509-829-5151

Vehicles subject to fees

  • Passenger vehicles
  • Trucks that weigh 6,000 pounds or less
  • Motorcycles
  • Commercial passenger vehicles and trucks that weigh 6,000 pounds or less
  • Combination trucks that weigh 6,000 pounds or less
  • Tow trucks
  • House moving dollies
  • Trucks used exclusively for hauling logs that weigh 6,000 pounds or less
  • Taxicabs
  • For-hire or stage vehicles with 6 seats or less
  • For-hire or stage vehicles with 7 or more seats that weigh 6,000 pounds or less
  • Private use trailers over 2,000 pounds
  • Motorcycle trailers
  • Travel trailers
  • Fixed load vehicles that weigh 6,000 pounds or less
  • Mobile homes licensed as vehicles

Exempt vehicles

  • All farm vehicles
  • Campers
  • Off-road vehicles
  • Snowmobiles
  • Mopeds
  • Personal use trailers with a single axle and less than 2,000 pounds scale weight
  • Commercial trailers
  • Combination trailers
  • Trailers used exclusively for hauling logs
  • Horseless carriage, collector, or restored-plate vehicles
  • Converter gear
  • Government vehicles
  • Private school vehicles
  • Vehicles properly registered to disabled American veterans

How a transportation benefit district works

Once a local transportation benefit district is set up, the district’s board of directors may vote to charge a local vehicle licensing fee due when a vehicle owner buys new tabs.

  • The transportation benefit district board has the authority to impose a fee of up to $20 per vehicle without voter approval.
  • A transportation benefit district may impose a vehicle renewal fee of up to $100 per vehicle or seek other sources of funding if approved by voters.

Related laws

State Parks Asks “Would You Like Flies With That?”

As the process moves forward, public comments, questions and suggestions received about the future of Washington State Parks will be made available online at www.parks.wa.gov/Beyond2013/. 

Public meeting locations, dates and times are as follows: 

• Tri Cities: 7 to 8:30 p.m. May 17
Columbia Basin College
2600 N. 20th Ave. 
Building A, room A126
Pasco, WA 99301

• Spokane: 3:30 to 5 p.m. May 19 (focus on Riverside State Park) and 6 – 7:30 p.m. May 21 (focus on Mount Spokane State Park)
Spokane Public Library Shadle Branch
W. 2111 Wellesley Ave.
Spokane, WA 99205

• Central and East Wenatchee: 7 to 8:30 p.m. May 22
Washington State Parks Eastern Region Headquarters
270 Ninth Street N.E. 
Ice Age Conference Room
East Wenatchee, WA 98802

• Friday Harbor: 2:15 to 4 p.m. June 2
Whidbey Island Bank – Community Room
535 Market Street
Friday Harbor, WA 98250

• Olympia: 7 to 8:30 p.m. June 5
Tumwater High School
700 Israel Road S.W.
Olympia, WA 98501

• Seattle area: 7 to 8:30 p.m. June 6
King County Department of Development and Environmental Services
900 Oakdale Ave. S.W.
Renton, WA 98057

• Fort Worden State Park: 6:30 to 9 p.m. June 11
200 Battery Way
Company A
Port Townsend, WA 98368

• Burlington: 6:30 to 9 p.m. June 12
Burlington Library
Burlington Rotary Community Meeting Room
820 E. Washington Ave.
Burlington, WA 98233

• Chinook: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 14
Fort Columbia State Park Theater
475 Highway 101
Chinook, WA 98638 
Individuals, groups and organizations wishing to join an e-mail list for updates on the planning process are invited to use the following contact information: 

• E-mail: Strategic.Planning@parks.wa.gov
• Phone: (360) 902-8504 and ask for Strategic Planning
• Mail: Washington State Parks, Strategic Planning, P.O. Box 42650, Olympia, WA 98504-2650 

Stay connected to your state parks by following Washington State Parks at www.facebook.com/WashingtonStateParks, www.twitter.com/WaStatePks_NEWS and www.youtube.com/WashingtonStateParks. 

The Commission manages a diverse system of more than 100 state parks and recreation programs, including long-distance trails, boating safety and winter recreation. The 99-year-old park system will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013. For more information on Centennial 2013, visit www.parks.wa.gov/Centennial2013.

Support state parks by purchasing your Discover Pass today, and enjoy a whole year of outdoor fun on Washington’s beautiful state-managed recreation lands. For more information, visit www.discoverpass.wa.gov.