Pacific County Deputies assist commercial gillnet vessel with engine failure

South Bend, WA. – On August 25th at approximately 6:10 PM, the Sheriff’s Office received a request for assistance from the operator of a commercial gillnetting vessel that had experienced engine failure. The vessel was forced to anchor in Willapa Bay near Bay Center. Deputies responded from the South Bend area in the Sheriff’s Office patrol and search and rescue vessel to assist.

 

Deputies successfully provided safe passage and tow for the vessel and the operator back to the South Bend boat launch. Sheriff Scott Johnson stated, “I am very pleased with the quick response that our office was able to provide in this situation. We have been working very hard to increase our services to the public. Our marine services division is one example of a service that didn’t exist in years past. We recognize that our public’s safety is equally important on or within our waterways.”

 

Sheriff Johnson also added, “We are grateful for the positive support that we have received from the Board of County Commissioners, helping to aid us with jumpstarting the marine program”.

Registered Sex Offender Working For Carnival at Pacific County Fair Arrested

South Bend, WA. – This morning a registered sex offender identified as Jason A. Miner, age 38, and of Yakima was arrested by Pacific County Sheriff deputies at the Pacific County Jail. Miner was reporting to the Sheriff’s Office to register within our county as required by state law. Miner was in Pacific County working for the company contracting carnival rides and activities at the Pacific County Fair.

Miner was arrested on an outstanding felony warrant out of Yakima County for failing to register as a sex offender. Miner was booked into Pacific County Jail for the warrant. Bail is set at 10,000.00.

West Nile virus infection confirmed in Washington resident

A Walla Walla County man is the first Washington resident in 2014 known to have been infected with West Nile virus in our state. The man in his 20s was likely exposed near his home and was hospitalized. The infection was confirmed by testing at the Washington State Public Health Laboratories in Shoreline.

Two other Washington residents have been diagnosed with the infection this year, both with exposures in other states. A King County man in his 70s and a Grays Harbor woman in her 50s were infected with West Nile virus this year while traveling out of state. Additional reports of possible infections are currently under investigation.

“The mosquito samples that have tested positive for West Nile virus in eastern Washington this season are a reminder that the virus is here and we should protect ourselves,” said State Health Officer Dr. Kathy Lofy. “The best prevention is to avoid mosquito bites — at home and while traveling.”

So far, 34 mosquito samples have tested positive for West Nile virus in 2014, including Benton County (11), Franklin County (11), and Grant County (12). The number of positive mosquito samples detected this year has already surpassed the number found during the past three years, combined (28).

Year after year, south central Washington has been a “hot spot” for the virus, with most in-state acquired human and animal cases having been exposed in this area. Mosquito testing shows the virus is in our state, and the mosquito species that transmit the virus are found throughout Washington. Regardless of where you are, health officials recommend avoiding mosquito bites to help prevent getting infected.

A few simple precautions can help reduce your chances of getting mosquito bites:

  • Stay indoors around dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Use a mosquito repellent when spending time outdoors, and consider wearing long sleeves and pants when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Be sure that door and window screens are in good condition so that mosquitoes cannot get indoors.
  • Reduce mosquito habitat around the home by dumping standing or stagnant water in old buckets, cans, flower pots, or old tires, and frequently change water in birdbaths, pet dishes, and water troughs.

West Nile virus is primarily a bird disease, and often dead birds are an early sign that the disease is active in an area. People may report dead birds online to public health officials. So far this year no dead birds have been reported with the infection in the state.

Most people infected with West Nile virus will have no symptoms at all. Others may develop fever, headache, or body aches. For a small percentage of people, West Nile virus infection can be very serious, resulting in encephalitis, meningitis, or other complications. People over age 50 have the highest risk for serious illness.

Last year, only two human infections of West Nile virus were reported, and both were exposed out of state. During 2012, four cases were reported, two of which were in-state acquired while the other two were travel-associated. The state most active year was 2009, in which there were 38 human cases, 95 animal cases (including birds), and 364 positive mosquito samples. It’s impossible to predict what each year may bring, so it’s important to do things to prevent mosquito bites and protect yourself from West Nile virus infection.

More information is available on the agency’s West Nile virus information line, 1-866-78-VIRUS (1-866-788-4787) and on the West Nile virus website.

The Department of Health website (www.doh.wa.gov) is your source for a healthy dose of information. Also, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Bishop Center for Performing Arts receives ArtsWA Innovation grant

The Bishop Center for Performing Arts at Grays Harbor College is among several Washington State arts organizations who have been awarded grants as part of ArtsWA’s inaugural Innovations Incentives Program. Arts organizations applied for the Incentives awards as part of the annual competitive Grants to Organizations projects support process.

The Bishop Center was awarded $2,000 in the Level B catagory, according to their website, they received a Project Support grant of $2,400 last year to increase access to, and participation in cultural opportunities. “This year we offered professional arts organizations a chance to compete for an extra $1,000 to $3,000 for innovative projects that will increase art participation with young adults and diverse audiences,” said Mayumi Tsutakawa, ArtsWA Grants Program Manager. “As a result, Innovations Incentives grants were awarded in each of the project support levels for fiscal year 2015. These incentive awards were in addition to the amount ArtsWA granted to the organizations for their FY 2015 project support funds.”

The Innovations Incentives awards are an outgrowth of ArtsWA’s Arts Participation Leadership Initiative (APLI), a five-year project funded by The Wallace Foundation that investigates methods arts organizations can use to broaden, deepen and diversify their participating audiences, supporters and artists. This subsequent pilot program focused on projects that addressed young adults and racially diverse demographic groups, and emphasized projects that employed new uses of social media and technology.

 

$1,000 –  Level A (Arts Organizations with an annual budget of $200,000 or less)

Mid Columbia Mastersingers / Richland
The grant will be used to introduce dramatic staging elements and operatic treatment in the “All Creatures Great and Small” performance of Benjamin Britten’s “Noye’s Fludde” (Noah’s Flood). Mid Columbia Mastersingers are working to draw a larger and more diverse audience to this project which will help to increase the interest in choral music.
Seattle Women’s Jazz Orchestra (SWOJO) / Seattle
To initiate an online music publishing division for SWOJO’s unique jazz ensemble composition contest for women composers. The purpose is to expand participation in, awareness of, and access to, the contributions of women composers in jazz.
Student Orchestras of Greater Olympia / Olympia

To pilot “Media on the Mezz.” This program dedicates the mezzanine level in the Washington Center for the Performing Arts for audience members who will use their phones and cameras to post comments, photos and video clips on social media during the concerts. The goal is to attract and encourage young audience members to use social media as an integrated approach to audience development.

$2,000 – Level B (Arts Organizations with an annual budget between $200,000 to $1 million)


Earshot Jazz / Seattle

Incentives funds will be used to involve young professional artists to help curate the 2015 Earshot Jazz Festival. The goals are to create a more diverse range of content and also to build future presenters and audiences.

 

Richard Hugo House / Seattle
Richard Hugo House plans to use Innovations Incentives funds to videotape its Lit Series and Word Works readings, making them available on its website and e-newsletters. The project will help writers investigate craft and help Richard Hugo House expand audiences.

Seattle JazzEd / Seattle

Seattle JazzEd plans to partner with Odessa Brown Clinic, presenting youth music classes and concerts at the inner city health center. Funds will also be used for the JazzEd staff to receive training to help them better serve the social/economic needs of its students.

$3,000 – Level C (Arts Institutions with an annual budget of over $1 million)

On the Boards (OtB) / Seattle

OtB will strengthen diversity in its community with the Ambassador Project, convening 15 individuals from a cross-section of Seattle’s creative industry and arts community to serve as ambassadors. It envisions the project will create conversations about aesthetics and community issues. These new ambassador voices will help interpret performances, lead artist questions & answers and broaden attendance; including curating the 12 Minutes Max performance lab; creating artist-to-artist dialogues; and producing workshops and collaborative performances that contextualize mainstage pieces.

Tacoma Symphony Orchestra (TSO) / Tacoma

Tacoma Symphony will create the Mini Maestros Program in partnership with Lakewood Boys & Girls Club, targeting low income families in the South Tacoma area. Its goal is to inspire and provide access to quality live music and education events, working to reduce psychological barriers to classical music programs. TSO plans to use the Innovations Incentives grant to improve overall academic fitness by involving children in the arts.

House mover to save Olympic National Park chalet

An historic Olympic National Park lodge teetering on the edge of the Quinault River should be moved next month before it falls into the water.

The park has awarded a $124,000 contract to the Monroe House Moving company of Carlsborg to move the Enchanted Valley Chalet to safer ground.

The Peninsula Daily News reports (http://is.gd/JkU7T7) most materials will be packed in by mule because the site is in a wilderness area. The park service will provide a helicopter for big equipment.

The chalet is located 13 miles from the nearest road. It was built as a backcountry lodge in the 1930s, before the creation of the park. More recently, it has been used as a wilderness ranger station and emergency shelter.

The Grays Harbor PUD has announced a planned power outage in the South Beach area that will impact about 5,000 customers from the Ocean Spray facility in Markham west to the ocean beaches and south to Tokeland.

The outage will start at 10PM on September 11, 2014 and is expected to last until 6:00 AM on September 12.

Grays Harbor PUD announces planned South Beach outage

The Grays Harbor Public Utility District has announced a planned power outage which will impact PUD customers in the South Beach area of Grays Harbor County.  The outage will begin at 10:00 PM on September 11, 2014 and is expected to last until 6:00 AM on September 12.

 

The outage will impact all Grays Harbor PUD customers after the Ocean Spray facility in Markham west to the ocean beaches and south to Tokeland.  In all 4,837 Grays Harbor PUD customers will be impacted.

 

During the outage, multiple PUD crews will replace three transmission poles and one distribution switch in addition to carrying out substation maintenance work.  This is the fourth planned outage undertaken by PUD crews this summer, as the District strengthens its infrastructure by replacing aging poles and carrying out line and substation maintenance.

 

In preparation for this outage, customers are advised to take precautions with any electronic equipment such as computers, televisions, and microwaves by unplugging those items.  You should leave them disconnected until after the power has been fully restored.

 

The outage time of eight hours is only an estimate and power could be restored at any time as work is completed.  Therefore, it is not safe to do electrical work or repairs during that period of time.

Homemade explosive device injures 3 South Aberdeen residents

A homemade explosive device sent three to the hospital Monday afternoon, Detective Sergeant Art Laur tells us at about 6:22pm, they received information from staff at the Grays Harbor Community Hospital that a 26 year-old man and 21 year- old woman were being treated for burns related to a small explosion. A third victim, a 4 year-old female, was mentioned as also injured in the explosion but was not currently at the hospital. Aberdeen Officers responded to a residence located in the 1600 Block of Coolidge road in an effort to locate the child.

When the officers arrived at the residence they observed a roll of toilet paper smoking on the pavement behind the house. Also noted in the area was a severely chard women’s tank top. While at the residence, it was discovered that the 4 year-old child was now at the hospital having her injuries attended to.

Aberdeen Police Detectives were called to the location and soon determined that the 26 year- old male had been at the residence with his 21 year-old girlfriend and 4 year-old niece. He had placed the toilet paper roll on the ground and poured black powder on top of it. He then lit a fuse which he had attached to the paper, causing the powder to smoke and flash. He then attempted this act again but when he poured the black powder on top, it exploded.

The male received burns to his left hand and leg. The 21 year-old female received burns to both legs, abdomen, and left arm. The 4 year-old child received burns to her upper chest and shoulder area. The 21 year-old female and 4 year-old child were transported by ambulance to Harborview Medical Center with non life threatening injuries. The 21 year-old male was taken to the same location by a family member. Both females remain at Harborview in satisfactory condition. The male was treated and released.

The investigation is on going.

 

Washington’s Clean Boating Program wins $1.5 Million federal grant for waste pumpouts

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced a $1.5 million grant to the Washington State Parks Department’s Clean Vessel Act (CVA) Program, which works in partnership with Washington Sea Grant to help marinas install and operate septic pumpout stations, educate marina owners and boaters about the importance of clean water and proper onboard sewage disposal, and distribute free adapter kits that make pumping easier and cleaner. The grant is one in a $16.1 million package awarded competitively to 21 states’ CVA programs. Washington, which has one of most active and innovative CVA programs, received the fifth-highest award.

“Clean water is a fundamental need for both people and wildlife, and a perfect example of how the fates of both are intertwined,” USFWS Director Dan Ashe said in announcing the grants. “Clean Vessel Act grants not only help ensure that clean drinking water, sustainable ecosystems and healthy recreational areas are accessible to the American people, they also provide a substantial economic benefit for local communities.”

This year those benefits will be especially directed to the San Juan Islands, which have rich marine habitats, heavy boating activity, and limited pumpout facilities, as well as South Puget Sound, Hood Canal and Lake Washington, longtime boating and water-quality hotspots. Washington State Parks is currently seeking sources for the 25 percent match required under the grants to fund a second pumpout boat on Lake Washington and a free pumpout service in the San Juans.

Clean Vessel Act funds come from manufacturer excise taxes on fishing tackle, import duties on recreational boats and fishing gear, and motorboat and small engine fuel taxes. Last year, Washington’s Clean Vessel Program diverted more than 5.6 million gallons of raw sewage that would otherwise have contaminated state waters, threatening fish, shellfish, and human health.

Washington Sea Grant and its partners, including the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and U.S Power Squadron, have delivered hands-free pumpout adapters to more than 7,000 boaters. Sea Grant has also created a Google map showing all 146 CVA pumpout locations in Washington, available at www.pumpoutwashington.org.

Boaters, yacht clubs and other organizations that would like free pumpout adapters should contact Aaron Barnett at (206) 616-8929 or aaronb5@uw.edu.

Cosmopolis man cited for DUI after SUV slides into tree

A Cosmopolis driver was cited for DUI at the scene of an accident on State Route 101 last night. The Washington State Patrol charged the 60 year old with Driving Under the Influence after his 2005 Chevy Trailblazer lost control in the Southbound lane just after 9 last night, the truck over-corrected and crossed the oncoming lane, then slid sideways into a tree about 2 miles South of Cosmopolis. The driver was transported from the scene with undisclosed injuries.

Olympic National Forest asks “Which roads are important to you?”

The Olympic National Forest is hosting open houses asking the public to share the areas and roads they use on the Forest.  This information will help the Forest identify a financially sustainable road system that meets diverse access needs, minimizes environmental harm, and is safe and dependable because it is scaled to available resources.

 

“Your participation will help us understand your access needs,” said Forest Supervisor Reta Laford.  “It would be particularly helpful to know what areas you use on the Forest and what roads you use to get there.”

 

The open houses will be held around the Olympic Peninsula during the summer of 2014.

 

DATE TIME LOCATION
July 30 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Quinault  – Olympic National Forest, Quinault Ranger Station • 353 South Shore Rd.
August 19 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Shelton  – Shelton Civic Center • 525 West Cota St.
August 21 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Aberdeen – Rotary Log Pavilion •1401 Sargent Blvd.
August 27 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Olympia  – Olympic National Forest, Supervisor’s Office •1835 Black Lake Blvd. SW

 

In addition to attending open houses, the public may provide comments using the web-based map or on-line questionnaire on the Forest website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/olympic/sustainableroads.  Questionnaires are also available at any Olympic National Forest office.  Comments will be taken until August 31, 2014.

 

Forest road.

Approximately 2,000 miles of roads on the Olympic National Forest provide access for resource management, recreation, and a variety of other uses. About 1,200 miles are open to motorized vehicles and 600 miles are closed, that may be opened intermittently for resource management.

As part of a National effort, we are conducting a road system analysis to identify the minimum road system needed “for travel and for administration, utilization, and protection of National Forest System lands” [36 CFR 212.5(b)Forest Service Manual 7710Forest Service Handbook 7709.55(20)].

By the Fall of 2015, we will integrate agency and public input to produce a travel analysis report that will provide the basis for developing future proposed actions for travel management.

Your participation will help us understand your access needs! Learn how to help.