Truck drifts off roadway, throws debris into oncoming U.S. 101 traffic North of Shelton

The South bound lane of U.S. Route 101 North of Shelton was blocked for about 8 hours this afternoon as the Washington State Patrol investigated, and cleaned up, a 3 vehicle accident. No injuries were reported. Just before 1 Tuesday afternoon a 1998 Kenworth Tractor with dump bed trailer, driven by a 62 year old Vancouver man, was Southbound on 101 when it drifted onto the soft shoulder, rolled onto its side, and spilled debris into the road. The wreck also threw debris into the path of an oncoming car, a 2012 Jeep Liberty driven by an 80 year old Olympia man, and at a parked 2010 Dodge Pickup nearby. The State Patrol trooper listed the dump truck as totaled, the Jeep and pickup both sustained some damage.

 

Eight days of morning razor clam digs approved, starting April 17 on Long Beach, Twin Harbors, and Mocrocks

Razor clam diggers can return to coastal beaches starting Friday, April 17, state shellfish managers announced today.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams on those beaches are safe to eat. All of the digs are scheduled on morning tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, noted that the upcoming dig coincides with the Long Beach Razor Clam Festival, scheduled April 18-19 in Long Beach. Festival events range from free clam-digging lessons to a fritter cook-off. More information is available at http://longbeachrazorclamfestival.com/

Under state law, diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches, and low tides:

  • April 17, Friday, 6:03 a.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks 
  • April 18, Saturday, 6:52 a.m.; -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis 
  • April 19, Sunday, 7:39 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis 
  • April 20, Monday, 8:25 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 21, Tuesday, 9:11 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 22, Wednesday, 9:57 a.m.; -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 23, Thursday, 10:46 a.m.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 24, Friday, 11:38 a.m.; 0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors

WDFW has also proposed additional digs in May, pending the results of future marine toxin tests. Tentative dates for those digs are posted on the department’s website at wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2015-16 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

During all upcoming digs, state wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula, and on a section of Twin Harbors beach.

The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and “horns.”

To protect these birds, the department asks that clam diggers avoid the dunes and areas of the beach with soft, dry sand. When driving to a clam-digging area, diggers should enter the beach only at designated access points and stay on the hard-packed sand near or below the high tide line.

Westport Winery earns gold in New York Finger Lakes International Wine Competition

Westport Winery brought home five medals from the Finger Lakes International Wine Competition in Rochester, New York. This is the competitions 15th year with 73 judges from around the world judging 3708 wines from 27 countries.

2015 Boom FrontDirector of Winemaking, Dana Roberts, earned a gold medal on Boom Runner, a sparkling pomegranate wine that benefits Hoquiam’s Polson Museum. Silver medals were awarded to Smoky Nor’wester Sangiovese, Shorebird Chardonnay, and Elk River Riesling.

 

Smoky Nor’wester benefits the Museum of the North Beach in Moclips and features grapes from the renowned Red Willow Vineyard in the Yakima Valley AVA. Shorebird Chardonnay benefits the Grays Harbor Audubon and features grapes from Conner-Lee Vineyard near Othello. Elk River Riesling, also from Red Willow Vineyard, benefits the Twin Harbor Chapter of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

2015 Smoky Front

2015 Mercy FrontCidermaker Carrie Roberts earned a silver medal for Mercy, her hard apple cider. Each of Westport ciders (Mercy, Courage, Hope and Grace) benefits Mercy Ships an organization providing surgical care to the poorest of the poor in Africa.

Westport Winery’s award-winning wines are exclusively available at the winery. The tasting room, gift shop, produce market, plant nursery and bakery are open daily from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The restaurant is open for lunch daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and for dinner on Friday and Saturday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information contact Westport Winery at 360-648-2224 or visit the website at www.westportwinery.com.

2013 Shorebird PosterLaunch spring at the winery’s unique sculpture garden, lavender labyrinth, musical fence, 9-hole executive golf course, giant chess set, outdoor scrabble game, and grape maze, all located on the corner of Highway 105 and South Arbor Road halfway between Aberdeen and Westport. You will see why Westport Winery was named Best of the Northwest Wine Destination.

 

 

Olympic National Park Staff Prepare for Summer Season: Come Find Your Park This Spring

As migrating birds return and wildflowers bloom in the lowland forests, employees at Olympic National Park are turning their attention to spring cleaning and preparations for the main visitor season.

“We’ve had an early spring at Olympic National Park and we’re happy to see people already coming out to enjoy the warmth, sunshine and budding trees,” said Olympic National Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum.  “It’s still wintry at the park’s higher elevations though, and no matter the elevation, visitors should always be prepared for changing conditions, as rain and even snow are possible at any time of year.”

 

Staircase

The Staircase Campground is open year round for primitive camping (pit toilets and no water.)  Drinking water and flush toilets will be available during for the summer season from May 22 through September 28.

 

Dosewallips

The Dosewallips Road remains closed due to a washout outside the park boundaries in Olympic National Forest, so access to the campground is walk-in (5.5 miles) only.

 

Deer Park

Deer Park Road and campground are both scheduled to open by mid-June, snow permitting.  While most of the road is snow-free, drifts remain at the upper elevations.  If conditions allow, this area may open earlier than scheduled. The campground provides primitive camping, with pit toilets and no drinking water.

 

Hurricane Ridge Road and Heart O’ the Hills

Hurricane Ridge Road is currently open as weather and staffing allow. People should call the Road & Weather Hotline at 360-565-3131 for current conditions and road status.

 

Beginning in early May, the road is generally open 24 hours a day, unless road work or late spring snow storms cause it to close temporarily.

 

The Hurricane Hill Road (the 1.5 mile of road that leads past the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center to the Hurricane Ridge picnic area and Hurricane Hill trailhead) is expected to open by mid-June.

 

Reaching elevations over 6,000 feet, sections of the Obstruction Point Road are still covered with four to five feet of snow, with higher drifts in some areas.  This road is expected to open in mid-June snow permitting.  If conditions allow, it may open earlier.

 

The Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center will be open on weekends only beginning May 2.  Weekend hours will continue through June 7.  The Visitor Center will be staffed daily beginning June 12.  The snack bar and gift shop on the lower level of the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center will be open on weekends only from May 3 – May 18 and will open daily beginning May 22. Check http://www.olympicnationalparks.com for more information.

 

The Olympic National Park Visitor Center is open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. except for Thanksgiving and Christmas.

 

Heart O’ the Hills Campground is open year round with drinking water and flush toilets available.

 

Elwha Valley

The Olympic Hot Springs Road is open to the Boulder Creek Trailhead, unless road work or weather conditions close it temporarily.   There is currently no access from the Olympic Hot Springs Road to Glines Canyon or the former Lake Mills, as construction of a new parking area and viewpoint continues. This area is expected to open this summer.

The Whiskey Bend Road is closed to vehicle traffic at Glines Canyon Overlook, one mile above the intersection with Olympic Hot Springs Road. Winter rains caused a major washout that destrobyed a 500-foot section of road. The road remains open to foot, bicycle and horse travel, but all horse trailers must be parked and stock off-loaded at the Elwha picnic area. Horse trailers are not allowed on the Whiskey Bend Road because there not  currently a turnaround that will accommodate trailers.

 

The Elwha Campground is open year round for primitive camping (pit toilets and no water.)  Drinking water and flush toilets will be activated for the summer on April 17 through September 14.

 

Altair Campground is closed until further notice because of damage and loss of campsites and roadway caused by high winter flows along the Elwha River.  A timeline and plans for repairing and reopening the campground have not been completed.

 

Olympic Raft and Kayak, based just outside the park along the Elwha River, offers guided raft trips on the Elwha River, as well as kayak trips and other opportunities.  Check http://www.raftandkayak.com/ for more information.

 

Lake Crescent

Lake Crescent Lodge will open for the season on May 2 and will remain open through January 1, 2016, offering a range of lodging options, a dining room, boat rentals and gift shop.  More information is available at http://www.olympicnationalparks.com

 

Fairholme Campground will open this summer from May 21 through October 5, with drinking water and flush toilets available.  Beginning May 1, Fairholme General Store will be open Friday through Sunday through May 17.  Beginning May 22, the store will be open daily through September 7.

 

The Log Cabin Resort will open May 22 through September 30 for lodging, RV and tent camping, a boat launch, dining room and store.  More information is available at http://www.olympicnationalparks.com

 

La Poel Picnic area will open for day use on Saturday, May 23.

 

Sol Duc Valley

The Sol Duc Road is generally open 24 hours a day, unless road work or weather conditions cause it to close temporarily.

 

The Sol Duc Campground is open year round; drinking water and flush toilets will be activated on April 16.

 

The Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort, is open for the season with lodging, dining, hot springs and a small store.  More information is available at http://www.olympicnationalparks.com

 

Hoh Rain Forest

The Hoh Rain Forest Road is generally open 24 hours a day, unless road work or weather conditions cause it to close temporarily.  The Hoh Rain Forest Campground is open year round with drinking water and flush toilets available.

 

The Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center is currently operating out of a temporary trailer while the main visitor center is under renovation.  The visitor center is now open Friday through Tuesday and will be open daily from June 17 through September 7.  The primary visitor center is expected to reopen this spring, at which time the temporary facilities will be removed.

 

Pacific Coast

Kalaloch, Mora and Ozette—Olympic National Park’s road-accessible coastal destinations—are open, including all roads, campgrounds and trailheads, except for the Beach Four parking area and trail, which are closed due to erosion damage.

 

The Kalaloch and Mora campgrounds both provide drinking water and flush toilets.  The Ozette Campground is primitive, with pit toilets and no potable water in the campground, however, water is available nearby.  South Beach Campground, a primitive campground located just south of Kalaloch, will open on May 15.

 

The Kalaloch Information Station will be open five days a week (Tuesday through Saturday) beginning on May 19.  Daily hours will begin June 16.

 

Kalaloch Lodge is open year-round with cabins, lodge rooms, dining and a gift shop.  For more information, check http://www.thekalalochlodge.com/ for more information.

 

Queets Valley

The Lower and Upper Queets roads are both open 24 hours a day, unless road work or weather conditions cause temporary closures, however the Lower Queets Road is closed about a half-mile below Matheny Creek (one mile before the end of the road) due to road damage. The Queets Campground is open for primitive camping with pit toilets and no potable water.

 

Quinault Rain Forest

The Quinault Loop Road, which includes the Quinault North Shore and South Shore roads, is open. The Graves Creek and North Fork roads are also open.  All Quinault area roads are typically open 24 hours a day, unless temporarily closed by road work or weather conditions.

 

The Graves Creek Campground and North Fork Campground are both open for primitive camping with pit toilets and no drinking water.

 

Park Trails & Wilderness Information Center
The Olympic National Park Wilderness Information Center (WIC), located at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center in Port Angeles is open daily from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and will be open from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. beginning May 12.

 

Visitors are encouraged to stop by or call the Wilderness Information Center located within the Olympic National Park Visitor Center at 360-565-3100 for current trail reports, spring hiking safety tips and trip planning suggestions.  Information is also available at the park’s website.

Several feet of snow remains on the ground, beginning at elevations above 4,000 feet. Even at low elevations, hikers are reminded to use caution and be aware of downed trees, trail damage, high and swift creek crossings, and changing weather conditions.

Public comments sought on Weatherwax Wetland and Habitat Mitigation Bank in Ocean Shores

The city of Ocean Shores is getting into the Mitigation Banking business the Department of Ecology is accepting public comment on certification of the Weatherwax Wetland and Habitat Mitigation Bank.
The city has been working on forming a mitigation bank on the 120 acres of wetlands since 2011, certification would finalize the process and permanently preserve the property. With projected revenues of over a million dollars, the Department of Ecology projects to award almost 12 credits for mitigation on the property.

Continue reading Public comments sought on Weatherwax Wetland and Habitat Mitigation Bank in Ocean Shores

Raines leads on election night, along with Incumbent Democrats in 19th and 24th

Preliminary numbers for the November General Election are in, Elections Supervisor Katy Moore tells us with over 15,000 ballots counted so far, Grays Harbor County voter turnout is just over 41%. “We’re hoping to get to 18, or 19-thousand by the time that we certify the election, which is November 25th.”
With ballot drop boxes being returned Tuesday night, and some ballots still in the mail. Moore said the tightest race is for Grays Harbor County Prosecutor Katie Svoboda holds 620 more votes than Mike Spencer.

Vickie Raines holds a strong lead in the race for Grays Harbor County Commissioner “Right now Vickie Raines is currently in the lead with 8,577 to Keith Olson 5,817.”

Dan Lindgren is holding a strong lead over incumbent Rick Hole for the Grays Harbor County Assessors position, while Grays Harbor PUD incumbent Commissioner Russ Skolrood is leading over John Straka.

An Excess levy for ambulance Services in Fire District 17 that covers Humptulips/Axford Prairie appears to be passing.

Incumbent U.S. Representative Derek Kilmer is leading over Marty McClendon, while incumbent Dean Takko leads over David Steenson, incumbent Brian Blake leads over Hugh Fleet, and incumbent Steve Tharinger leads over Thomas Greisamer

In Pacific County, they’re looking at closer to 51% voter turnout so far, incumbent Commissioner Lisa Ayers is leading over Michael Hess. Incumbent County Prosecutor David Burke is trailing challenger Mark McClain by over 1100 votes. and Incumbent PUD Commissioner Mike Swanson is holding on to a strong lead over Joe Basil. (BASE-UL)

Pacific County is also passing an EMS Ambulance fund.

Incumbent U.S. Representative Jaime Herrera Beutler lead over Bob Dingethal, and incumbent South District Court Judge Douglas Goelz is leading over Nancy R. McAllister.

Razor Clam dig approved November 4th through November 11th

Clam diggers can return to coastal beaches starting Tuesday, Nov. 4, to dig razor clams during the first of two planned openings in November.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the latest round of evening digs after marine toxin test results showed the clams are safe to eat. Digging is not allowed on any beach before noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said the best digging typically occurs one to two hours before low tide.

“With daylight saving time ending Sunday, diggers will have even less daylight to dig by and should bring lanterns or headlamps,” Ayres said.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Digging days and evening low tides during the upcoming opening are:

  • Nov. 4, Tuesday; 4:26 p.m., -0.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 5, Wednesday; 5:14 p.m., -0.7 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 6, Thursday; 5:59 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 7, Friday; 6:42 p.m., -1.2 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 8, Saturday; 7:24 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • Nov. 9, Sunday; 8:05 p.m., -0.7 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 10, Monday; 8:47 p.m., -0.3 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 11, Tuesday; 9:31 p.m., 0.2 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors

 

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state. A WDFW video, which demonstrates how to teach your kids to harvest razor clams, is available at http://youtu.be/gl9p_PparVk.

Ayres suggested that diggers also should check the forecast before heading out to the beaches.

 

“Clamming has been good when the weather hasn’t chased diggers away,” he said.

 

WDFW also has proposed another dig in November, tentatively set to begin Nov. 20 if marine toxin tests are favorable. That dig is tentatively scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

 

  • Nov. 20, Thursday; 5:06 p.m., 0.0 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 21, Friday; 5:45 p.m., -0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 22, Saturday; 6:24 p.m., -0.8 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • Nov. 23, Sunday; 7:05 p.m., -1.0 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 24, Monday; 7:47 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 25, Tuesday; 8:32 p.m., -0.9 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 26, Wednesday; 9:19 p.m., -0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors

 

Comprehensive information about razor clams – from updates on tentative digs to how-to advice on digging and cooking – is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

Coast Guard seeks public comment on waterways analysis study of Grays Harbor

 

Coast Guard officials are seeking public comment while conducting a waterways analysis and management system review of Grays Harbor.

Officials are seeking information from local mariners regarding the general use of the waterways and any issues with the visibility, placement or location of aids to navigation in that area before the comment deadline of Jan. 31, 2015.

This WAMS is the second combined WAMS and includes five old waterways: Grays Harbor Main Channel, Hoquiam Reach, North Bay, South Channel and South Bay.

Coast Guard officials use WAMS to validate the adequacy of the existing aids to navigation systems and to get a better understanding of the uses of each waterway and general safety issues. WAMS focuses on the waterway’s present ATON system, marine casualty information, port and harbor resources, changes in recreational and commercial marine vessel usage and future dredging and development projects.

Continue reading Coast Guard seeks public comment on waterways analysis study of Grays Harbor

Denny’s Restaurant to open its doors in Aberdeen November 9th

On Sunday, Nov. 9, at 6 p.m., a new Denny’s will open its doors in Aberdeen (418 W. Heron Street), unveiling its all-new, locally-inspired design and diner menu with an all day celebration. To celebrate the opening of its newest location and thank the surrounding community for its support, Denny’s will offer games and prizes along with giveaways of some of the diner’s most beloved dishes all day on Wednesday, Nov. 19.

At Denny’s, America’s diner, everyone is always welcome – welcome to drop in 24/7, welcome to enjoy good food and great value, and now Denny’s welcomes local residents, guests and visitors to stop by its newest location in Aberdeen. Located at 418 W. Heron Street, the new diner will officially open its doors on Sunday, Nov. 9, at 6 p.m.

To celebrate the opening of its newest location and thank the surrounding community for its support, Denny’s will offer games and prizes along with giveaways of some of the diner’s most beloved dishes all day on Wednesday, Nov. 19. The first 100 guests to stop by the restaurant between 9 and 10 a.m. will receive a free Grand Slam breakfast, which includes two buttermilk pancakes, two eggs cooked to order, two bacon strips and two sausage links; the first 25 guests to dine with Denny’s from noon to 1 p.m. will get a free classic hamburger and fries and the first 25 guests from 6 p.m. onward will get a free dinner entrée.

“As America’s diner, Denny’s guests have come to our diners to sit back, relax and enjoy delicious, hearty meals for more than 60 years. We hope to bring that same sense of community to Aberdeen with this new restaurant,” said Denny’s district manager Prashant Sharan. “From breakfast any time to satisfying lunches and dinners, if hungry fans are in the mood for it, chances are we’re serving it.”

The new diner will have a significant impact on the Aberdeen community by creating more than 50 jobs for local residents and is conveniently situated at the corner of West Heron and South Jefferson Streets, next to the L&I Department and near the Safeway.  Denny’s is also known for providing its customers with tremendous value, including these great deals:

  • $2 $4 $6 $8 Value Menu® – Denny’s all day, every day value menu lets guests choose from 16 dishes at affordable prices, including traditional favorites as well as several new a la carte items.

 

  • Kids Eat Free – Guests can receive up to two free kids meal for children ages 10 and under with the purchase of each adult entrée. The offer is good from 4 to 10 p.m. on Tuesdays, and menu items and prices may vary.

 

  • “Fit Fare” – Delicious choices that are good for you, too.  Denny’s “Fit Fare” options feature healthy choices like egg whites and hearty wheat breads that can be substituted into any meal for no extra charge. Using the expansive Build Your Own Grand Slam® menu, diners have more than 250 ways to build a meal with 550 calories or less, and 32 ways to build a meal of 400 calories or less. With plenty of simple substitutions and healthy “Fit Fare” entrees found throughout the lunch and dinner menu, Denny’s makes it easy for you to eat well on the go.

 

  • Free Birthday Grand Slam®– Celebrate your special day with a free Original Grand Slam® meal at participating Denny’s restaurants. The Original Grand Slam® offer is free for the birthday guy or gal who can show proof that it’s their birthday, and is good for dine-in only.

 

  • AARP Members Save 15 Percent – Show your AARP membership card at participating Denny’s restaurants and save 15 percent off your total check.

 

About Denny’s Corp.

Denny’s is one of America’s largest full-service family restaurant chains, currently operating more than 1,680 franchised, licensed and company-owned restaurants across the United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Mexico, Honduras, Guam, Puerto Rico and New Zealand. For further information on Denny’s, including news releases, please visit the Denny’s website at www.dennys.com.

 

Connect with Denny’s

For news and updates on Denny’s please visit the brand’s social channels via Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest or Youtube.

WDFW seeks comment on Burrowing Shrimp in Grays Harbor

OLYMPIA – The shellfish industry has requested to use the pesticide imidacloprid in Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor to help control burrowing shrimp.

Burrowing shrimp harm oyster production. They destabilize tidelands, causing oysters to sink into mud and sand, and suffocate.

The Washington Department of Ecology is developing a permit that would allow the use of the pesticide. Ecology determined that an environmental impact study (EIS) is needed before a new permit can be issued.

An EIS reports on the potential impacts a proposed project would have on the environment. The study is a key component of the state’s water quality permit process.

The public is invited to review and comment now through Dec. 8, 2014, on the draft EIS, draft permit, and draft sediment impact zone. Visit Ecology’s website for information on how to submit comments.

Ecology will accept oral and written comments during a public meeting at 10 a.m., Dec. 2, at the Willapa Harbor Community Center, 916 W. First St., South Bend.

The shellfish industry’s control of burrowing shrimp in Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor is in transition. Coastal shellfish growers have used the pesticide carbaryl for decades to control burrowing shrimp on their commercial oyster and clam beds. The Willapa Grays Harbor Oyster Growers Association agreed to phase out carbaryl by 2013 under a settlement agreement with the Washington Toxics Coalition. Since carbaryl is no longer available, growers are requesting use of imidacloprid instead.

More information