Fishing vessel crew saves 2 near Grays Harbor

The crew of a fishing vessel rescued two men from the water near buoy 24 in Grays Harbor, Washington, Sunday.

The men, one 72-year-old and one 53-year-old, both Tacoma residents, were safely transferred to a Coast Guard Station Grays Harbor crew aboard a 25-foot Response Boat-Small, and taken to the station where they were met by EMS personnel and treated for signs of hypothermia.

Coast Guard Sector Columbia River watchstanders received a call from the fishermen at 11:49 a.m. reporting that they had rescued two men from the water near the Grays Harbor South Jetty.

The two men were aboard their 16-foot boat when a wave reportedly capsized them and they were thrown into the water. They were estimated to have been floating at sea for four to five hours while an incoming tide helped carry them into Grays Harbor where they were eventually rescued.

“The help and watchful lookout by the fishermen saved two men today,” said Petty Officer 1st Class Kevin Zariczny, an operations specialist and search and rescue coordinator at Sector Columbia River. “The life jackets the two boaters were wearing were vital in their rescue. However, without the help of the fishing vessel crew, we may never have known they were out there and in trouble.”

The Coast Guard encourages all boaters to have essential safety equipment on board their vessel, including life jackets, flares, and most importantly a way to call for help in an emergency. Having a VHF marine radio to call for help, or to be carrying an emergency position indicating radio beacon, is essential for letting someone know you need help.

Both men were treated and released by EMS personnel.

The exact position of the sunken vessel is unknown. Mariners are encouraged to keep a safe lookout for any hazards as they transit in and out of Grays Harbor. There are no reports of pollution from the sunken vessel.

Coast Guard rescues two stranded boaters near Willapa Bay

A Coast Guard Air Station Astoria MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew rescued two stranded boaters near Willapa Bay, Wash., Saturday.

The 67-year-old man and 57-year-old woman were safely transported to an airfield in Raymond, Wash., where they were met by local emergency medical services for evaluation.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Columbia River command center received the call for assistance via Pacific County Dispatch late Saturday night after the boaters reported their 12-foot aluminum skiff was aground on a mud flat. The two individuals became stuck in the mud after leaving their vessel to attempt to walk to shore prompting another 911 call. The command center watchstanders dispatched the Jayhawk crew to respond. Once on scene they hoisted the boaters aboard and departed to Raymond.

“This case illustrates the importance of having hoist capable helicopters in the Pacific Northwest,” said Mark Dobney a command duty officer at Sector Columbia River. “With the professionalism of our highly trained helicopter crews, along with aircraft capabilities, we were able to get these two boaters the help they needed in a timely manner.”

U.S. Coast Guard advises strong caution to beachgoers in the Pacific Northwest

Due to the recent number of fatalities the Coast Guard strongly cautions beachgoers to be aware of possible dangers to stay safe while enjoying the Oregon and Washington coasts.

During the past two months, the Coast Guard has responded to numerous reports of beachgoers swept out into the ocean along the Pacific Northwest coast. Since July 3, four of these cases have resulted in fatalities. These include a 10-year-old girl in Long Beach, Washington, July 3, a 53-year-old man in Seaside, Oregon, July 22, an 18-year-old man in Ocean Shores, Washington, July 26 and a 19-year-old man in Garibaldi, Oregon, Monday.

“In each instance, the people who got caught in the currents were visiting from out-of-town,” said Cmdr. Bill Gibbons, chief of response, Coast Guard Sector Columbia River. “Visitors are more likely to enter the water unaware of the unpredictable and extreme dangers posed by beach surf along the Pacific Northwest coast. In one instance, a victim was only in water up to his knees when he was knocked down by a wave and pulled out into the ocean.”

Beachgoers are reminded to always be aware of their surroundings. Water depths can change rapidly along the coastline and waves and rip currents can be very strong and unpredictable.

“The only way to avoid the risk is to avoid going in the water,” said Gibbons.  “At a minimum, people should never enter the water alone, children should never be allowed near the water unattended, and people who are near the edge of the surf line must be prepared for what many refer to as “sneaker waves” – disproportionately large and powerful coastal waves that can appear without warning.”

Additionally, since ocean temperatures in the Pacific Northwest remain around 55 degrees Fahrenheit during the summer months, wet or dry suits are advisable during prolonged water exposure.

“Tragic experiences such as the ones over the last couple of months highlight the need for beachgoers to be fully aware of the dangers while enjoying their time along the coast,” said Capt. Daniel Travers, commander, Coast Guard Sector Columbia River. “Incidents like the aforementioned can be reduced by planning ahead, being aware of your surroundings and observing beach safety guidelines.”

For more information on general beach safety along the Pacific Northwest coast visit http://visittheoregoncoast.com/beach-safety/ and http://www.ripcurrents.noaa.gov.

Coast Guard medevacs sick crewman from commercial ship west of Grays Harbor

Coast Guard Air Station Astoria helicopter crew medevaced a sick crewmember from a commercial shipping vessel more than 50 miles west of Grays Harbor, Washington, Monday.

Coast Guard Sector Columbia River watchstanders received the request for the medevac of a crewman aboard the 780-foot commercial motor vessel Horizon Enterprise who was reportedly suffering from sever abdominal pain.

After consulting a Coast Guard flight surgeon, the watchstanders directed the launch of an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Air Station Astoria.

The crew arrived on scene with the Horizon Enterprise and safely hoisted the sick crewman from the vessel.

“This was a quick and very successful mission,” said Lt. Adriana Knies, helicopter pilot and aircraft commander for the mission. “The crew of the ship was very helpful in providing a clear location on board the ship for a safe hoist of the injured crewman.”

The crewman was then flown back to the air station where he was transferred to waiting emergency medical services. EMS transported the crewman to Columbia River Memorial Hospital.  The crewman was reported in stable condition.

Coast Guard, Grays Harbor emergency response crews rescue injured surfer from jetty

WESTPORT, Wash. – A Coast Guard Air Station Astoria helicopter crew rescued an injured surfer from the Grays Harbor, Wash., south jetty Saturday.

The Coast Guard Sector Columbia River Command Center watchstanders received a request at 1:40 p.m. from Grays Harbor Police Department to assist in the safe evacuation of an injured surfer from the south jetty.

The surfer reportedly suffered multiple fractures and other injuries while surfing near the jetty.  A fellow surfer ran to shore to call for help, while other surfers assisted the injured man onto the jetty.

A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew was launched from Air Station Astoria to assist in the rescue effort.  The helicopter crew was able to coordinate with personnel on the ground to safely hoist the injured surfer and transfer him to emergency medical crews at Coast Guard Station Grays Harbor.
“The coordination between the helicopter crew and the rescue crews on the jetty was instrumental in the safe rescue of the surfer,” said Lt. Rob McCabe, the Jayhawk pilot. “Our thoughts are with the injured and his family, this was a tragic situation, and we hope he pulls through OK.”

The injured surfer was taken by local EMS to Grays Harbor Community Hospital in Aberdeen, Wash. for further medical care.

Coast Guard hoists man from jetty near Ilwaco

WARRENTON, Ore. — An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Astoria, Ore., hoisted one man after a vessel ran against the north jetty on the Columbia River near Ilwaco, Wash., Friday afternoon.

There were no reports of pollution or major injuries.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Columbia River, in Warrenton, were contacted at approximately 12 p.m. via VHF-FM radio by four mariners whose 17-foot vessel had become disabled and was drifting toward the jetty. Three people were able to get to shore while the vessel’s operator remained aboard to receive a tow from the good Samaritan crew of fishing vessel Beachcomber who towed the craft away from the jetty.

An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Astoria, Ore., hoists a man after he became stranded on the north jetty on the Columbia River near Ilwaco, Wash., Jan. 17, 2014. The aircrew successfully hoisted the man aboard the helicopter and transported him to Station Cape Disappointment. U.S. Coast Guard video by Sector Columbia River, Ore.
An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Astoria, Ore., hoists a man after he became stranded on the north jetty on the Columbia River near Ilwaco, Wash., Jan. 17, 2014. The aircrew successfully hoisted the man aboard the helicopter and transported him to Station Cape Disappointment. U.S. Coast Guard video by Sector Columbia River, Ore.

Search-and-rescue controllers diverted an aircrew aboard an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter, and directed the launch of a boatcrew from Station Cape Disappointment, in lwaco, Wash., aboard a 47-foot Motor Life Boat and a shore party to assist the stranded boaters. Two of the three stranded boaters were able to climb to safety with assistance from the Station Cape Disappointment shore party.

The aircrew was able to successfully hoist the third stranded man aboard the helicopter and transported him to Station Cape Disappointment.

The Cape Disappointment MLB crew took over the tow of the rescued vessel, towing it safely to the Fort Canby boat ramp in Columbia River’s Baker Bay.
“The Coast Guard thanks the crew of the fishing vessel Beachcomber for promptly rendering assistance by maneuvering close enough to the jetty to throw a line to the pleasure craft in distress and tow it to safety,” said Capt. Bruce Jones, Sector Columbia River commander and Jayhawk co-pilot for the case. “A few more minutes banging against the rocks and the vessel would have been seriously damaged or destroyed. Today serves as a reminder that even on beautiful, relatively calm days the Columbia River entrance can become dangerous to vessels with any type of mechanical failure. Boaters should always be thoroughly prepared to be placed in a survival situation.”

Coast Guard medevacs one 10-miles west of Grays Harbor

SEATTLE — A Coast Guard aircrew from Air Station Astoria, Ore., medevaced an injured crewmember from a 623-foot cargo ship after he sustained a head injury 10 miles west of Grays Harbor, Wash., Friday.

The crewmember was reportedly conscious when transferred into the care of local emergency medical services.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Columbia River, Ore., received notification from the cargo ship Star Delta’s agent requesting assistance when a crewmember injured their head after the vessel encountered a swell.

Due to heavy weather concerns, the watchstanders conducted a conference with aircrew members from Air Station Astoria and the flight surgeon. The decision was made to deploy an HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew to the scene to assess the best course of action in getting the injured crewmember medevaced.

Once arriving on scene, the aircrew determined that weather conditions wouldn’t be a hindrance and was able to successfully hoist the crewmember aboard the Jayhawk.

“One of the things that made this operation successful was being able to discuss, first hand, the operational risk with the aircrew and flight surgeon,” said John Dodd, command duty officer at Sector Columbia River. “Once you’ve openly discussed everyone’s concerns, you can discuss the best courses of action, which helps an operation to go smoother.”

The crewmember was brought back to Air Station Astoria and transferred to local EMS.

He was taken to Columbia Medical Center in Astoria for further evaluation.

Coast Guard responds to fire aboard fish processor in Westport

WESTPORT, Wash. – A 131-foot fish processing vessel erupted into flames early Saturday morning. The Coast Guard reports the master of The Juno was aboard at the time, and was not hurt.

The cause of the fire is under investigation, and no injuries were reported. The Westport Fire department said the fire was reported at 1:30 Saturday morning, they contacted watch-standers at Coast Guard Station Grays Harbor in Westport for assistance fighting the fire. Two 47-foot Motor Life Boat crews were launched to respond.

The fire was reported out at 4:05 a.m. There is thought to be approximately 5,000 gallons of firefighting water aboard, with 4 1/2 to 5 feet on deck, causing the vessel to list.

Members of the incident management division from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River in Warrenton, Ore., were dispatched to the scene to monitor the removal of the firefighting water and mitigate any potential environmental hazards caused by the vessel.

Ghost ship washes ashore in Ocean Shores

History:

WARRENTON, Ore. – Coast Guard rescued a sailor from his sailboat, which was beset by weather more than 14 miles off shore of Tillamook Harbor Saturday.

The crew of an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter rescued the skipper of the 40-foot long sailboat, The Rock, and safely transferred him to Coast Guard Air Station Astoria.

Coast Guard Sector Columbia River received a call for assistance from the Duane Jones, an Oak Harbor, Wash., resident and the skipper of the sailboat, stating he was experiencing severe weather off the Oregon Coast.

Due to the Tillamook Harbor Bar being closed to all recreational boat traffic and with the onset of night, Jones did not feel safe staying on his boat and asked to be rescued.

The Jayhawk crew arrived on scene with the sailboat and safely hoisted Jones from his boat.

“This is our first major storm of the fall and we want to make sure that all boaters are prepared for the weather,” said Petty Officer 1st Class William Whitford, an operations specialist at Sector Columbia River. “This guy did the right thing in letting us know that he was experiencing difficulties and then asking for help when things got beyond his control. All boaters need to be prepared for any possibilities, including having the proper radio equipment on board to call for help if needed.”

As weather permits, Air Station Astoria crews are planning a future flight to find the abandoned vessel and ascertain its condition. Any salvage of the vessel will be the owner’s responsibility.

There were no injuries in this rescue. 

For safe boating information, please visit: http://www.uscgboating.org/

A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter approaches Air Station Astoria, Ore., after rescuing a man from his sailboat off of Tillamook Harbor, Ore., Sept. 28, 2013. The sailor was aboard his 40-foot sailboat and experiencing waves of more than 20 feet when he requested assistance from the Coast Guard. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley.

A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter approaches Air Station Astoria, Ore., after rescuing a man from his sailboat off of Tillamook Harbor, Ore., Sept. 28, 2013.

The sailor was aboard his 40-foot sailboat and experiencing waves of more than 20 feet when he requested assistance from the Coast Guard.

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley.

A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter returns to Air Station Astoria, Ore., after safely rescuing a man from his sailboat off of Tillamook Harbor, Ore., Sept. 28, 2013. A severe fall storm with winds of more than 25 mph and waves of more than 20 feet caused the sailor to request assistance from the Coast Guard. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley.

A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter returns to Air Station Astoria, Ore., after safely rescuing a man from his sailboat off of Tillamook Harbor, Ore., Sept. 28, 2013.

A severe fall storm with winds of more than 25 mph and waves of more than 20 feet caused the sailor to request assistance from the Coast Guard.

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley.

Duane Jones (left), who was just rescued from his 40-foot sailboat shares a moment with his rescuers upon returning to Coast Guard Air Station Astoria, Ore., Sept. 28, 2013. An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Air Station Astoria rescued Jones who was caught in a fall storm off the Oregon coast. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley.

Duane Jones (left), who was just rescued from his 40-foot sailboat shares a moment with his rescuers upon returning to Coast Guard Air Station Astoria, Ore., Sept. 28, 2013.

An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Air Station Astoria rescued Jones who was caught in a fall storm off the Oregon coast.

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley.

Fishing vessel safely removed from beach near Grays Harbor

Coast Guard air and boatcrews responded where an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew lowered a dewatering pump to the vessel and then landed on the nearby beach to assist in the pumps operation.  The boatcrew was unable to assist the 44-foot steel-hulled vessel due to the shallow water depth.  However, Station Grays Harbor personnel organized a beach team and reached the vessel by foot.

There are no reports of crew injuries or pollution from the grounding of the vessel. 

The cause of the incident is under investigation. 


Coast Guard personnel from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River arrive at the location of the fishing vessel Adrianna approximately one-half mile south of the entrance to Grays Harbor, Wash., Sept. 6, 2013.  The fishing vessel went aground after a crewmember reportedly fell asleep while driving the boat.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Esquivel.

Coast Guard personnel from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River arrive at the location of the fishing vessel Adrianna approximately one-half mile south of the entrance to Grays Harbor, Wash., Sept. 6, 2013.

The fishing vessel went aground after a crewmember reportedly fell asleep while driving the boat.

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Esquivel.

The 44-foot fishing vessel Adrianna rests aground in shallow waters approximately one-half mile south of the entrance to Grays Harbor, Wash., Sept. 6, 2013.  The vessel was carrying three crewmembers when is went aground, however, no injuries or pollution were reported from the incident.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Esquivel.

The 44-foot fishing vessel Adrianna rests aground in shallow waters approximately one-half mile south of the entrance to Grays Harbor, Wash., Sept. 6, 2013.

The vessel was carrying three crewmembers when is went aground, however, no injuries or pollution were reported from the incident.

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Esquivel.

- See more at: http://www.uscgnews.com/go/doc/4007/1892121/Multimedia-Release-Fishing-vessel-safely-removed-from-beach-near-Grays-Harbor-Wash-#sthash.Il2Ug0Cs.dpuf


Audio: The master of the fishing vessel Adrianna calls for help as the vessel goes aground approximately one-half mile south of the entrance to Grays Harbor, Wash., Sept. 6, 2013. Coast Guard crews responded where they helped ensure the safety of the three crewmembers aboard the fishing vessel. U.S. Coast Guard audio.