Washington Attorney General warns of scams targeting Washington State Employees Credit Union members

The fraudsters are at it again. Members and non-members have reported receiving texts that appeared to come from Washington State Employees Credit Union (WSECU) stating their card had been deactivated or suspended. If you received this text, DO NOT respond.

Multiple text messages went out with different response phone numbers. As we learn of each number, we are working with our partners to shut these fraudulent phone numbers down.

If you received this text and responded to it, please call our Contact Center at 800.562.0999 for assistance; Monday – Friday 7:00 am-7:00 pm and Saturday 9:00 am-2:00 pm. After hours, call 866.861.5416 immediately to speak to a representative and have your card blocked.

Texts of this nature are referred to as “smishing” and are an attempt to obtain your card information to commit fraud. If you are wondering how they matched your phone number to your WSECU account the good news is they didn’t. They use a “shotgun” approach when sending texts and hope for a match. This is why both members and non-members receive the texts. As soon as we learn of these attempts we also use social media to get the word out. Look for updates on both Facebook and Twitter.

On Friday, April 18, we also learned about a vishing attempt where members are receiving automated phone calls stating their debit cards have been put on hold, deactivated or suspended and instructions to follow to reactivate it. This is very likely another attempt at fraud; however, it mirrors the process used by Falcon, our fraud prevention service. If you receive such a call, you can verify it is Falcon by the phone number, which is 866.221.5006. If the number displayed or the number given to call back is not this number, do not respond. To learn more about how Falcon works, click here.

We have great education resources here on our website (type “fraud” in the search field or visit our Community & Education section) and we’re also using e-mail to share the same information with you. While we do contact members via text on occasion, we will never send you a text asking you to call and provide confidential information that we already have on file. Fraud attempts like these tend to happen after hours or on the weekend when we’re closed. So keep your guard up and never provide personal or card information in response to an unsolicited request.

Read more information about fraudulent texts (“smishing”) here.

Read more about fraudulent phone calls (“vishing”) here.

State disciplines health care providers

OLYMPIA – The Washington State Department of Health has taken disciplinary actions or withdrawn charges against health care providers in our state.

The department’s Health Systems Quality Assurance Division works with boards, commissions, and advisory committees to set licensing standards for more than 80 health care professions (e.g., medical doctors, nurses, counselors).

Information about health care providers is on the agency website. Click on “Look up a healthcare provider license” in the “How Do I?” section of the Department of Health website (doh.wa.gov). The site includes information about a health care provider’s license status, the expiration and renewal date of their credential, disciplinary actions and copies of legal documents issued after July 1998. This information is also available by calling 360-236-4700. Consumers who think a health care provider acted unprofessionally are encouraged to call and report their complaint.

Benton County

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program charged registered nursing assistant Elizabeth Nahleen Messinger (NA60020561) with unprofessional conduct. Charges say a resident at the adult family home where Messinger worked loaned or gave her $500. Messinger allegedly admitted accepting the money but hasn’t repaid it.

Clark County

 

In February 2014 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program ended probation for chemical dependency professional trainee Christina Ann Gjesvold, also known as Christina Ann Stroup (CO60224108).

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission entered an agreement with registered nurse Brenda Lee Hanson (RN00129197) that reinstates her license and requires her to participate in a substance abuse monitoring program. Hanson admitted diverting controlled substances while working at two Oregon hospitals. Her Oregon license was suspended and then placed on probation for three years before she voluntarily surrendered it, saying she doesn’t plan on working in Oregon.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program conditionally granted a certified nursing assistant credential to Michelle Shree Gray (NC60356138) and placed her credential on probation for at least five years. She was convicted in Washington of one felony and in Oregon of crimes equivalent to six felonies and five gross misdemeanors between 2000 and 2009.

 

Cowlitz County

 

In February 2014 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program ended probation for chemical dependency professional trainee Brandi Michelle Olney (CO60211959).

 

Grant County

 

In February 2014 the Respiratory Care Practitioner Program entered an agreement with respiratory care practitioner Colette K. Lancaster (LR00003822) that places her credential on probation for at least two years. Lancaster practiced outside her scope when she discontinued a patient’s oxygen flow without a physician’s order.

 

King County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission charged registered nurse Shaun J. Richardson (RN00131344) with unprofessional conduct. Richardson allegedly didn’t comply with a substance abuse monitoring contract.

 

In February 2014 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program conditionally granted a chemical dependency professional credential to Kimberly Marie Rohwer (CP60229246) and placed it on probation for at least three years. Rohwer, who must enroll in a substance abuse monitoring program, received a chemical dependency professional trainee credential in 2012 that was placed on probation.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program entered an agreement with certified nursing assistant Alexander Gachie Mbugua (NC60029168) requiring him to enroll in a substance abuse monitoring program. Mbugua was convicted of driving while intoxicated twice in 2010 and once in 2011.

 

In February 2014 the Medical Assistant Program conditionally granted an interim medical assistant credential to Edrie Roy Caminong (IC60439546) requiring him to continue complying with a substance abuse monitoring contract that he signed when he was granted a health care assistant credential in 2010.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission charged registered nurse Paulus R. Kutrich (RN00169953) with unprofessional conduct. Allegations are that Kutrich didn’t comply with a substance abuse monitoring contract.

 

In February 2014 the Unlicensed Practice Program notified Lianhua Li of its intent to issue a cease-and-desist order. Li, who has no massage practitioner credential, allegedly provided massage to a client.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program ended probation for certified nursing assistant Biniam Beraki Belay (NC60223264).

 

Kitsap County

 

In February 2014 the Occupational Therapy Board ended conditions on the credential of occupational therapist Linda S. Baker (OT00000498).

 

In February 2014 the Chemical Dependency Professional Program ended conditions on the credential of chemical dependency professional trainee Carolyn Rae Bjorkheim (CO60197879).

 

Pierce County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission amended a statement of charges against licensed practical nurse Bilinda Hunter (LP00049336) to delete two allegations of inadequate documentation or diversion of narcotic medication.

 

Snohomish County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission entered an agreement with registered nurse Cassandra L. Abbott (RN00097911) that places her credential on probation for at least two years, fines her $1,000, and requires her to complete continuing education in ethics, legal issues and professional boundaries. Abbott sent hydrocodone prescriptions to a pharmacy for a patient at least 37 times. The patient was another clinic employee’s husband. Abbott listed a prescribing physician on the prescriptions who wasn’t the patient’s primary care provider. The physician listed didn’t know of or approve the prescriptions.

 

Spokane County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program reinstated the certified nursing assistant credential of Denia Caridad Correa (NC10046540). Her credential was suspended in 2011 after she didn’t respond to a Department of Health inquiry about apparent irregularities involving patient medication.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission reinstated the registered nursing credential of Robin Marie Pena (RN60219122) and ordered her to enroll in a substance abuse monitoring program. Pena’s license was indefinitely suspended in 2013 after she surrendered her Alaska license in connection with allegations of a falsified application, and that she had a chemical dependency.

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Commission ended probation for registered nurse Linda C. Weinzimmer-Kirk (RN00084119).

 

In March 2014 the Unlicensed Practice Program notified Melissa R. Hubbard of its intent to issue a cease-and-desist order after she allegedly engaged in massage practice in 2013 even though her massage practitioner credential expired in 2008.

 

 

Stevens County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program charged certified nursing assistant Jennifer L. McKinney (NC10075495) with unprofessional conduct. McKinney allegedly didn’t comply with a substance abuse monitoring contract.

 

Yakima County

 

In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program charged certified nursing assistant Elizabeth Hernandez Aldana (NC60299567) with unprofessional conduct. In 2013 Aldana was convicted of third-degree assault — domestic violence.

 

Out of State

 

Oregon: In February 2014 the Nursing Assistant Program entered an agreement with certified nursing assistant Guadalupe Gutierrez (NC60151060) requiring her to enroll in a substance abuse monitoring program. In 2012 Gutierrez was convicted in Oregon of driving while intoxicated.

 

Oregon: In March 2014 the Dental Commission charged dentist Delon Karsten Gilbert (DE60361877) with unprofessional conduct. In 2013 Gilbert pleaded no-contest in Oregon to unlawful possession of cocaine.

 

Pennsylvania: In February 2014 the Osteopathic Board charged osteopathic physician David Thomas Steves (OP60243088) with unprofessional conduct. Steves allegedly visited an elderly female patient’s home several times without an invitation, and discussed his sexual problems in his marriage with the patient. Charges say Steves acknowledged the allegations and admitted having gone too far in discussing his personal problems with her. The patient allegedly interpreted the comments as a proposition for sex with her.

 

Note to Editors: Health care providers charged with unprofessional conduct have 20 days to respond to the Department of Health in writing. The case then enters the settlement process. If no disciplinary agreement can be reached, the case will go to a hearing.

The Department of Health website (www.doh.wa.gov) is your source for a healthy dose of information. Also, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

WDFW to review status of western gray squirrel, seeks public comment

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is seeking updated information on western gray squirrels as the agency reviews the species’ threatened status in Washington.

WDFW is looking for information on topics such as the condition of western gray squirrel habitat, population levels in different regions, or private conservation efforts that have benefitted the species.

“The scientific data we gather from individuals as well as private and public groups will help the department determine whether to reclassify the western gray squirrel,” said Penny Becker, WDFW listing and recovery section manager.

The agency will accept public input on western gray squirrels through March 28, 2015.

Once hunted in Washington, western gray squirrels have been protected in the state since 1944 and were added to the state’s list of threatened species in 1993.

Western gray squirrels historically were more widespread in Washington but today inhabit three isolated regions: the Puget Trough in Pierce County; the southeastern foothills of the Cascade range (primarily Klickitat county); and the North Cascades (Chelan and Okanogan counties). The amount of suitable habitat for the species has declined due to the effects of urbanization, logging and land conversion, Becker said.

WDFW initiated this review after accepting a citizen petition to consider giving western gray squirrels a greater level of protection by elevating the species’ status to endangered. The petition presented sufficient information to warrant a more detailed status review, Becker said.

“We were planning to evaluate the status of western gray squirrels as part of the initiative we announced earlier this year to review all species currently listed in Washington as endangered, threatened or sensitive,” Becker said. “The petition just bumped up how soon we’ll look at western gray squirrels.”

Written information may be submitted through WDFW’s website athttp://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/endangered/status_review/comments.html, via email to TandEpubliccom@dfw.wa.gov or by mail to Penny Becker, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA 98501-1091.

WDFW would seek additional public comment should the agency propose a change to the western gray squirrel’s listing status in Washington.

For more on western gray squirrels and other species under review, visit WDFW’s website athttp://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/endangered/status_review/ .

 

 

The Decline of the Western Gray Squirrel

The western gray squirrel was added to Washington’s list of state threatened species in 1993 when surveys indicated a decline in its geographical distribution. The species was once common at low to mid-elevations in dry forests where oak, pine, and Douglas-fir mix, and could be found in the south Puget Trough and Columbia River gorge and on the east slope of the Cascades north to Okanogan County. Its range is now limited to three isolated populations and each of these has serious threats to their continued persistence. These threats include (1) habitat loss and degradation from human development, catastrophic wild fires, logging, fire suppression, and invasion by weeds; (2) highway mortality; (3) disease (e.g., mange, tularemia); (4) possible competition with eastern gray, eastern fox, and California ground squirrels, and wild turkeys; and (5) potential loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding resulting from the small sizes and isolation of populations. State lawRCW 77.15.130 protects nest trees used by western gray squirrels. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists will consult with landowners to protect and enhance oak/conifer habitat.

State revokes, suspends licenses, certifications, registrations of health care providers

OLYMPIA ¾ The Washington State Department of Health has revoked or suspended the licenses, certifications, or registrations of health care providers in our state. The department has also immediately suspended the credentials of people who have been prohibited from practicing in other states.

The department’s Health Systems Quality Assurance Division works with boards, commissions and advisory committees to set licensing standards for more than 80 health care professions (e.g., medical doctors, nurses, counselors).

Information about health care providers is on the agency’s website. Click on “Look up a healthcare provider license” in the “How Do I?” section of the Department of Health home page (doh.wa.gov). The site includes information about a health care provider’s license status, the expiration and renewal date of their credential, disciplinary actions and copies of legal documents issued after July 1998. This information is also available by calling 360-236-4700. Consumers who think a health care provider acted unprofessionally are also encouraged to call and report their complaint.

Continue reading State revokes, suspends licenses, certifications, registrations of health care providers

Two-way traffic restored on US 101 at Rock Crusher Hill

ARTICWashington State Department of Transportation crews have completed repairs on a slide-prone 200-foot-section of US 101 near Artic, restoring two-way traffic to the area. The repairs were completed with compressed gravel, which will require that a temporary 25 mph speed reduction remain in place until further notice.

This section of highway is located on top of an active landslide and has a history of pavement settlement. Previously, WSDOT installed a culvert into the hillside to divert water away from the road. Despite efforts to reduce land movement, the slide continues to move and disrupt the highway surface. Patching and paving efforts, seen as only temporary repairs by WSDOT, will continue until funds for a permanent repair can be identified.

Washington wolf population kept expanding last year, according to WDFW survey

MOSES LAKE – Gray wolves established four new packs and expanded their territory in the state over the past year, state wildlife managers told the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission at a public meeting here today.

That assessment was based on an annual survey by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) that confirmed the presence of 13 wolf packs, five successful breeding pairs and at least 52 individual wolves in 2013.

Donny Martorello, WDFW carnivore specialist, said the latest findings point to continued growth in the state’s wolf population under state and federal recovery plans.

“While we can’t count every wolf in the state, the formation of four new packs is clear evidence of steady growth in Washington’s wolf population,” he said. “More packs mean more breeding females, which produce more pups.”

All but eliminated from western states in the last century, wolves are now protected under Washington law throughout the state and under federal law in the western two-thirds of the state.

The commission, an appointed panel that sets policy for WDFW, approved the plan in 2011 that guides state management and recovery of wolves in Washington.

In developing its annual update, WDFW used a combination of aerial surveys, trackers and signals from 11 wolves fitted with active radio-collars, Martorello said.

Three of the new packs – Ruby Creek, Dirty Shirt and Carpenter Ridge – were formed by wolves that split off from the existing Smackout Pack in northeast Washington, he said.

A fourth new pack, the Wenatchee Pack, appears to be made up of two female wolves from the Teanaway Pack, whose territory stretches between Ellensburg and Wenatchee.

Under the state’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan, a wolf pack is defined in the state plan as two or more wolves traveling together.

Despite their growing numbers, wolves were involved in far fewer conflicts with humans and livestock in 2013 than in the previous year, Martorello said.

Stephanie Simek, WDFW’s wolf conflict-resolution manager, said the department investigated 20 reported attacks on pets and livestock last year, but found that wolves were actually involved in only four of them. Confirmed wolf attacks left one calf dead and three dogs injured, she said.

By comparison, wolves killed at least seven calves and one sheep in 2012, leaving six additional calves and two sheep injured, Simek said. Most of those attacks were made by the Wedge Pack on a single rancher’s cattle in northeast Washington, she said.

WDFW ultimately killed seven members of the Wedge Pack to stop the escalating series of attacks, although two wolves were still travelling as a pack in the same area in 2013, she said.

“That was an extraordinary event that we do not want to repeat,” said Martorello, noting that no wolves were killed by WDFW last year.

The 2013 survey does, however, reflect the death of five wolves, due to causes ranging from a car accident on Blewett Pass to a legal hunt on the Spokane Indian Reservation.

Simek outlined several steps WDFW has taken in the past year to reduce conflicts with wolves:

  • Cooperative agreements: The department entered into cost-sharing agreements with 29 livestock producers, who have made a commitment to take proactive steps to avoid conflicts with wolves. Typical strategies include improving fencing and sanitation, employing range riders and using non-lethal hazing methods to repel wolves.
  • Increased staffing: WDFW created a new 13-member Wildlife Conflict Section to work with livestock producers, landowners and entire communities to avoid conflicts with wolves. Seven of those positions were new hires in 2013.
  • Wolf Advisory Group: A new nine-member advisory group was established to recommend strategies for encouraging more livestock owners to enter into cooperative agreements, providing compensation for wolf-related economic losses, and other issues. Members of the group represent hunters, livestock producers and conservation groups.

“These actions have greatly improved the department’s ability to manage our growing wolf population and meet state recovery goals,” Martorello said.

Under the state’s wolf-management plan, wolves can be removed from the state’s endangered species list once 15 successful breeding pairs are documented for three consecutive years among three designated wolf-recovery regions – or 18 successful breeding pairs in one year among three designated wolf-recovery regions.

A successful breeding pair is defined as an adult male and female with at least two pups that survive until the end of the calendar year.

In 2013, WDFW documented three successful breeding pairs in the Eastern Washington recovery region and two pairs in the North Cascades recovery region. No wolf packs or breeding pairs have been documented on the South Cascades/Northwest Coast recovery region.

Meanwhile, the federal listing of gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act is currently under review. In June 2013, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced a proposal to delist gray wolves nationwide. A decision is expected by the end of 2014.

An overview of the 2013 wolf survey is posted on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/gray_wolf/. A full report will be available on that site by April 4, 2014.

Local projects among 70 statewide, proposed $202 million in loans/grants to protect Washington waters

The Washington Department of Ecology proposes to spend $202 million in dedicated grants and loans to help pay for 70 local projects across the state to protect the health of Washington waters. Included is a low interest loan for a new waste water collection system in the Oyehut/Illahee area that will eliminate 130 existing on-site sewage systems, as well as a loan to replace the outfall diffuser at the City of Aberdeen’s waste water treatment plant. There is also a proposed loan to complete the Shelton Basin 3 Sewer Rehabilitation Construction Project.The funding is contingent on a final state supplemental budget and final federal appropriations. It becomes available at the start of the state’s next fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014.

 
State financial managers calculate that 11 jobs in Washington are created for every $1 million spent for construction and design funding. That would make this proposed round of funding support more than 2,200 jobs. Over half of these are likely to be local construction jobs.
 
The funding will be directed to water protection on agricultural lands; upgrades and expansions of sewer plants and collection systems; septic system improvements; water protection and cleanup projects; efforts to manage stormwater; streamside restoration projects; and more.
 
Here are highlights of the proposed funding:
 
Port Angeles, Spokane, and King County are proposed to receive $62 million in Revolving Fund loans to correct combined sewer overflows (CSOs). CSOs are discharges of untreated sewage that overflow directly to nearby streams, lakes, and harbors when wastewater collection systems are overloaded by large stormwater flows.
 
Ecology proposes $1.1 million in grants for projects on both sides of the Cascades to protect clean water on agricultural lands. Of this funding:
  • The Palouse Rock Lake Conservation District proposes to enhance streamside areas of the Palouse River and create cost-share programs for no-till, direct seed programs.
  • Okanogan Conservation District wants to implement practices to help landowners protect waters from livestock access.
  • Benton Conservation District proposes to work with the public to understand and prevent nitrate pollution of drinking water.
  • Lewis County Conservation District plans to work on a project to prevent polluted runoff from irrigation practices.
  • In King County, American Farmland Trust plans to field-test strategies to improve water quality in farm areas along Newaukum Creek. 
 
In addition, $190 million is proposed to boost 39 wastewater treatment facility projects. Eight of these are proposed for communities that qualify for financial hardship status. They will receive grants, forgivable principal loans (loans that do not need to be paid back), and loans with interest rates as low as zero percent. The communities are:
  • Chehalis
  • Deer Park
  • Ilwaco
  • Morton
  • Sacheen Lake area of Pend Oreille County
  • Sun Acres in Spokane County
  • Shelton
  • Illayee/Oyehut area in Grays Harbor County
 
Project descriptions and proposed funding amounts can be found online
 
Ecology invites comments about this proposed funding. Email comments to Daniel Thompson at daniel.thompson@ecy.wa.gov or mail them to Department of Ecology, Water Quality Program, P.O. Box 47600, Olympia, WA 98504-7600, Attn: Daniel Thompson. Comments must be received by 5 p.m. March 24, 2014.
 
Ecology will hold a public meeting to discuss the proposed list at 1 p.m., Friday, March 7, at the Pierce County Library, PAC – Processing and Administrative Center, 3005 112th Street in Tacoma.
 
The funding is contingent on a final state supplemental budget and final federal appropriations. It becomes available at the start of the state’s next fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014.
 
Funding for Ecology’s integrated loan and grant program comes from a combination of dedicated state and federal monies.
 
Of the $202 million total, $180 million comes from the Washington State Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund. Another $20.3 million comes from the state Centennial Clean Water Program. And $1.6 million comes from the Clean Water Section 319 Nonpoint Source Fund. Read more about these funds and where the money comes from online.   

WDFW begins status reviews, seeks information on 15 wildlife species

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is seeking updated information about 15 wildlife species as part of a review of native wildlife populations listed by the state as endangered, threatened or sensitive.  

WDFW will accept public comments through Feb. 11, 2015, on the 15 species, which include the spotted owl, greater sage grouse and killer whale. A full list of the species is available on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/endangered/status_review/ .

The comment period is part of a process to update status reports for each species and determine whether the species warrants its current listing or deserves to be reclassified or delisted.

WDFW is specifically looking for information on:

  • Species demographics
  • Habitat conditions
  • Threats and trends
  • Conservation measures that have benefited the species
  • New data collected since the last status review for the species

Public input is an essential part of gathering the best available scientific data for a species, said Penny Becker, WDFW listing and recovery section manager.

“We are interested in obtaining information from the public, including non-governmental groups, universities, private researchers and naturalists,” Becker said. “Such groups and individuals could have valuable data, such as annual population counts or privately developed habitat management plans.”

Written information may be submitted through WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/endangered/status_review/comments.html , via email to TandEpubliccom@dfw.wa.gov , or by mail to Penny Becker, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA 98501-1091.

Updated status reports will be posted on the department’s website beginning next spring. Additional public comment would be sought if WDFW proposes to change a species’ status after concluding its review.

The public will be invited to comment on 30 other endangered, threatened or sensitive species over the next few years as WDFW conducts reviews

Explosion reported from across Grays Harbor, registered as small earthquake

Aberdeen, WA – An explosion was heard and felt earlier this afternoon in Aberdeen, Hoquiam, and even Montesano, but there is no need to fret, the explosion was due to a planned blasting by Weyerhaeuser.

Weyerhaeuser officials tell us, that the section 11 site had planned a blast for 3pm this afternoon, but went off a little early. Section 11 is near Ray Anderson Rd off of 101.

Usually, the blasts go unheard by residents but due to coincidental weather conditions, the blasts were more apparent. The blasts also had enough force to be registered with the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network as a 1.7 earthquake.

Bogus email urges Grays Harbor residents to report to court

HOQUIAM, Wash. – Some Grays Harbor residents are getting hit with a new scam e-mail that says they have a court date in “the court of Washington” on January 17th. Hoquiam’s Municipal court reports the email usually has a subject like “Urgent court notice” then a bogus refference number, and urges recipients to open the attached file for futher details on their court date. The attachment is malware, which attempts to further infect the target computer.

This email did not originate with the Administrative Office of the Courts or any Washington courts, and neither AOC nor the Judicial Information System (JIS) have been impacted in any way. For some useful information and tips, visit the FBI E-Scams and Warnings site at http://www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/e-scams

The Washington court system does not use email to inform you of any pending court dates, and urges you to delete the email without opening it.

For useful information on protecting your inbox, visit the FBI E-Scams section of their website, FBI.GOV