Unmanned Aircraft Use banned from Olympic National Park

Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of Olympic National Park is prohibited except as approved in writing by the superintendent.

“The use of unmanned aircraft would create unacceptable safety risks to park visitors, as well as impacts to visitor experience and enjoyment of the natural sights and sounds of Olympic National Park,”  said Sarah Creachbaum, Olympic National Park Superintendent.  “Additionally, the Wilderness Act of 1964 prohibits the use of motorized equipment within designated wilderness, which comprises 95 percent of the park.”

The term “unmanned aircraft” means a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links). This term includes all types of devices that meet this definition (e.g., model airplanes, quadcopters, drones) that are used for any purpose, including for recreation or commerce.

More information about the closure and other Olympic National Park regulations is contained in the Superintendent’s Compendium, available on the park’s website at http://www.nps.gov/olym/parkmgmt/upload/2014-Compendium-signed_20140818155824-1.pdf

House mover to save Olympic National Park chalet

An historic Olympic National Park lodge teetering on the edge of the Quinault River should be moved next month before it falls into the water.

The park has awarded a $124,000 contract to the Monroe House Moving company of Carlsborg to move the Enchanted Valley Chalet to safer ground.

The Peninsula Daily News reports (http://is.gd/JkU7T7) most materials will be packed in by mule because the site is in a wilderness area. The park service will provide a helicopter for big equipment.

The chalet is located 13 miles from the nearest road. It was built as a backcountry lodge in the 1930s, before the creation of the park. More recently, it has been used as a wilderness ranger station and emergency shelter.

The Grays Harbor PUD has announced a planned power outage in the South Beach area that will impact about 5,000 customers from the Ocean Spray facility in Markham west to the ocean beaches and south to Tokeland.

The outage will start at 10PM on September 11, 2014 and is expected to last until 6:00 AM on September 12.

Olympic National Park to move Enchanted Valley Chalet

PORT ANGELES, Wash. (AP) – Olympic National Park says it’s moving forward with a plan to move a historic chalet that’s being threatened by the shifting east fork of the Quinault River.

The Enchanted Valley Chalet, located 13 miles from the nearest road, was built as a backcountry lodge in the 1930s, before the creation of the park. More recently, it has been used as a wilderness ranger station and emergency shelter.

Visitors last winter noticed the river had come within 18 inches of the chalet, and recent photographs show the river undercutting the building by about 8 feet. Park Service officials said Monday that an expedited environmental review has been completed, giving them the green light to move the building.

They’re worried that if the chalet falls into the river it could harm protected bull trout.

Plans call for moving it away from the river bank before fall rains begin, and then undertaking a more complete study and public review to figure out what to do with the structure long-term.

Officials said they do not yet have details about how and when they will move the chalet.

Outdoor Burning Restricted in Grays Harbor County

Effective 12:01 A.M. Wednesday, July 16, 2014, Grays Harbor County Fire Districts and Fire Departments in cooperation with the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR.) and the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency (ORCAA), will be enacting restrictions on all outdoor burning. All residential burning, along with land clearing and silvicultural [forest practices] burning will be prohibited until further notice. Recreational campfires are allowed if built in improved fire pits in designated campgrounds, such as those typically found in local, county, and state parks and in commercial campgrounds. On private land, campfires are permitted with the landowner’s permission if built in the following approved manner: The campfire shall be no greater than 3-feet in diameter and constructed of a ring of metal, stone or brick 8-inches above ground surface, with a 2-foot- wide area cleared down to exposed soil surrounding the outside of the pit. -• The campfire shall have an area at least 10-feet around it cleared of all flammable material and at least 20-feet of clearance from overhead flammable materials or fuels. The campfire must be attended at all times by a responsible person at least 16-years old with the ability to extinguish the fire with a shovel and a 5-gallon bucket of water or with a connected and charged water hose. Completely extinguish campfires by pouring water or moist soil in them and stirring with a shovel until all parts are cool to the touch. The use of self-contained camp stoves is encouraged as an alternative.
For more information on local fire restrictions
Grays Harbor County: Fire Marshal’s Office at (360) .249-4222 Fire Districts: Emergency pages of the local telephone book City. Fire Departments: Government pages of the local telephone book Washington State Department of Natural Resources: Pacific Cascade Regional Office at (360) 577-2025 or Olympic Region Office at (360) 374-2811 Olympic Region Clean Air Agency: 1-800-422-5623 Olympic National Park and Olympic National Forest: (360) 565-3121
For daily updates on burn restrictions Contact DNR at 1-800-323-BURN or visit .the website at www2.wadnrmov/burn-risk then click on fire information in the far right corner. Contact ORCAA at 1-800-422-5623 or visit their website at www.orcaa.orq.

Final razor clam digs of the season to start May 27

Clam diggers will have one last chance to dig razor clams this season during a final opening set to begin May 27.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed at any beach after noon.

“These last digs will wrap up an excellent razor clam season during which diggers have been getting their limits with lots of big clams,” said Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager. “These dates will mark the end of the most productive razor clam season in more than 30 years.”

WDFW routinely closes the razor clam fishery by the end of May to give the clams a chance to spawn. The next season will begin in fall, when the older clams have recovered from spawning and a new generation begins to grow beneath the sand.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • May 27, Tuesday, 6:24 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • May 28, Wednesday, 7:06 a.m., -1.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • May 29, Thursday, 7:45 a.m., -1.4 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • May 30, Friday, 8:23 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • May 31, Saturday, 9:00 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • June 1, Sunday, 9:37 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Diggers may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, unless they possess a designated harvester card.

Brock Hoenes, WDFW wildlife biologist, cautions clam diggers and other beachgoers to avoid disturbing western snowy plovers, which nest on the state’s coastal beaches from April through August. The small white birds are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act as threatened and by the state as endangered.

Hoenes asks diggers to avoid signed upland beach areas at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, which are closed to protect the nesting birds. At Long Beach, the closed area is located north of Oysterville Road from the state park boundary north to Leadbetter Point. At Twin Harbors, the closed area is located just south of Cranberry Beach Road and continues south for approximately 1.5 miles.

Razor clam diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For more information on razor clam digging, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

 

Razor clam digs approved to start May 13, tentative dates listed through June 1

OLYMPIA – Clam diggers hoping for a few late-season razor clam digs on Washington beaches will have plenty of options to consider.
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today approved eight days of digging, beginning May 13. WDFW gave the OK for the series of digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.
The agency also announced a list of proposed digs, which would run May 27 through June 1. Final approval of these digs will depend on marine toxin tests that will be conducted closer to the start date, said Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager. The agency will announce final approval based on the results of the tests.
Ayres noted that the next series of digs includes dates at Copalis and Mocrocks beaches, which are co-managed with the Quinault Indian Nation (QIN).
WDFW was able to add days at Copalis because the QIN provided clams from their share to the state share, said Phil Anderson, WDFW director.
“This is a perfect example of how WDFW and QIN work together to co-manage this resource,” Anderson said. “We appreciate QIN’s willingness to share a portion of their harvest quota with us thereby contributing to the success of these final digs and providing an economic boost to businesses in the area.”

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

May 13, Tuesday, 6:21 a.m., -0.6 feet, Twin Harbors
May 14, Wednesday, 7:02 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 15, Thursday, 7:44 a.m., -1.5 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 16, Friday, 8:27 a.m., -1.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis
May 17, Saturday, 9:12 a.m., -1.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 18, Sunday, 9:59 a.m., -1.5 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 19, Monday, 10:50 a.m., -1.1 feet, Twin Harbors
May 20, Tuesday, 11:44 a.m., -0.6 feet, Twin Harbors

Digs that have been proposed but not yet approved are tentatively scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

May 27, Tuesday, 6:24 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 28, Wednesday, 7:06 a.m., -1.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 29, Thursday, 7:45 a.m., -1.4 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 30, Friday, 8:23 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 31, Saturday, 9:00 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
June 1, Sunday, 9:37 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Diggers may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, unless they possess a designated harvester card.
Clam diggers and other beachgoers should avoid disturbing western snowy plovers, said Brock Hoenes, WDFW wildlife biologist. The small white birds, which nest on the state’s coastal beaches from April through August, are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act as threatened and by the state as endangered.
Hoenes also asks that diggers avoid signed upland beach areas at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, which are closed to protect nesting western snowy plovers. At Long Beach, the closed area is located north of Oysterville Road from the state park boundary north to Leadbetter Point. At Twin Harbors, the closed area is located just south of Cranberry Beach Road and continues south for approximately 1.5 miles.
Razor clam diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.
For updates on upcoming digs, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

 

What can be done to save the Historic Enchanted Valley Chalet in the Olympic National Park?

The Enchanted Valley Chalet in the Olympic National Park is reaching a tipping point, 13 miles above the Graves Creek trail head in the Quinault Valley, the historic chalet is loosing ground to the the East Fork of the Quinault River.

Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum said they are reviewing what can be done, however “One thing that’s off the table right now would be going in and inserting [inaudible] into the bank. The bank is a 12 foot vertical and it is inside the wilderness boundary, and we are directed by law to let natural processes run so that’s a little bit tricky.”

The National Parks Department said the river has shifted toward the home by at least 15 feet in the past three months, and as of late last week was undercutting the chalet by about four feet.

The National Park Service said earlier this month that as it has for many years, the main channel of the East Fork Quinault River has continued to move across the Enchanted Valley floodplain this winter, further eroding the river bank and undermining the 1930s-era Enchanted Valley Chalet.

This winter’s storms and high flows have resulted in the Quinault’s main channel shifting by at least 15 feel in the past three months.  As of late last week, the river had undercut the chalet by approximately four feet.

“Within what is technically and economically feasible, we continue to do our very best to protect the area’s natural and cultural resources and its wilderness character,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum.  “Our options are limited, however, given the size and force of the river and the valley’s remote location within the Olympic Wilderness.”

An Olympic National Park crew recently returned from Enchanted VAlley, where they assessed and documented the Chalet’s condition and removed equipment, supplies and hazardous materials.  The building’s windows were also removed to both prevent glass from impacting the river and downstream natural resources and to preserve elements of the historic building.

Park staff continues to work closely with partners to develop the best course of action, both in the long and short term.  Key partners include the Washington State Historic Preservation Officer, Pacific West Regional Office of the National Park Service and concerned organizations and citizens.

“We understand that the Chalet occupies an important place in the history of this area, and we know that people hold deep regard and affection for the building,” said Creachbaum.  “We invite anyone who’d like to share photos or memories of the Chalet to post them on our Olympic National Park Facebook page.”

The park’s Facebook page is found at https://www.facebook.com/OlympicNPS.  The page, including a new album of Enchanted Valley photos, is visible to anyone with internet access.  People must have a Facebook profile in order to post their own photos and memories, however.

In early January, photographs and visitor reports revealed that the Quinault River had migrated to within 18 inches of the building.  Subsequent aerial photos illustrated the river’s continued movement toward the chalet.

Migration of the East Fork Quinault’s channel is common particularly in the loose, unconsolidated soils of Enchanted Valley.  Storms, fallen trees, rockslides and simply the constant process of erosion can all cause the river to shift and carve a new channel.

Located 13 miles up trail from the Graves Creek trailhead in Quinault Valley, the chalet was build by Quinault Valley residents in the early 1930s, prior to establishment of Olympic Natiaonal Park.  It served as a lodge for hikers and horse riders until the early 1940s.

Enchanted Valley is within the Olympic Wilderness, designated in 1988, and is a popular wilderness destination.  More recently, the chalet has been used as a backcountry ranger station and emergency hikers’ shelter.  The chalet was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.

Public meeting tonight on Wilderness Stewardship Plan for Olympic National Park

The public comment period opened earlier this month on a Wilderness Stewardship Plan in the Olympic National Park.
The National Park Service reports four alternatives are being discussed, a public meeting has been set for March 26th from 5 – 7pm at the Lake Quinault School to detail the options.

The no action alternative (Alternative A), is defined as the continuation of existing management practices. This alternative is required by law to be considered during the planning process. It sets a baseline of existing impacts continued into the future against which to compare impacts of the other alternatives.

There are also 3 action alternatives identified as Alternatives B, C, and D. The action alternatives must all be consistent with the various laws, regulations, and policies that guide management of the park. In addition, all of the alternatives would protect the qualities of wilderness character as required by the Wilderness Act of 1964.

Rabbit hole:

Olympic National Park » Olympic National Park Wilderness Stewardship Plan » Document List »Document Contents

Document Content:
ONP_WSP_Draft_Zones_FULL_TABLE.pdfONP_WSP_Draft_Zones_FULL_TABLE.pdf   (244.7 KB, PDF file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_B.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_B.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_C.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_C.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_D.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_D.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
Disclaimer: Links within the above document(s) were valid as of the date published.

Upcoming razor clam dig approved, shifts from evening to morning digs

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers have approved a series of razor clam digs that starts Wednesday (March 26) on evening tides, then switches to morning tides Sunday (March 30) for five more days of digging.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said the switch from evening to morning digs reflects the moon’s seasonal effect on the tides.

“It gets a little tricky scheduling digs at this time of year, but the goal is to arrange openings during the best clam tides,” Ayres said. “The split schedule also provides an opportunity for back-to-back digs the evening of Saturday, March 29, and the morning of Sunday, March 30.”

Ayres also noted that diggers will have to purchase a 2014 license to participate in digs after March 31.

 

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • March 26, Wednesday, 3:52 p.m.; 0.3 feet; Twin Harbors
  • March 27, Thursday, 4:48 p.m.; 0.1 feet; Twin Harbors
  • March 28, Friday, 5:38 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 29, Saturday, 6:23 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

(Seasonal switch to morning tides)

  • March 30, Sunday, 6:53 a.m.; -0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks 
  • March 31, Monday, 7:39 a.m.; -0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 1, Tuesday, 8:22 a.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 2, Wednesday, 9:05 a.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 3, Thursday, 9:49 a.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

Starting April 1, all diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses range from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, and are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For updates on upcoming digs, see WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html .

Public comment period opens on Wilderness Stewardship Plan for Olympic National Park

The public comment period opened yesterday on Wilderness Stewardship Plan in the Olympic National Park.
The National Park Service reports four alternatives are being discussed, a public meeting has been set for March 26th from 5 – 7pm at the Lake Quinault School to detail the options.

The no action alternative (Alternative A), is defined as the continuation of existing management practices. This alternative is required by law to be considered during the planning process. It sets a baseline of existing impacts continued into the future against which to compare impacts of the other alternatives.

There are also 3 action alternatives identified as Alternatives B, C, and D. The action alternatives must all be consistent with the various laws, regulations, and policies that guide management of the park. In addition, all of the alternatives would protect the qualities of wilderness character as required by the Wilderness Act of 1964.

Rabbit hole:

Olympic National Park » Olympic National Park Wilderness Stewardship Plan » Document List »Document Contents

Document Content:
ONP_WSP_Draft_Zones_FULL_TABLE.pdfONP_WSP_Draft_Zones_FULL_TABLE.pdf   (244.7 KB, PDF file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_B.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_B.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_C.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_C.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_D.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_D.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
Disclaimer: Links within the above document(s) were valid as of the date published.