Tag Archive for Olympic National Park

Grays Harbor Volunteer Search and Rescue now a 501c3 non-profit

GHVSAR
GHVSARAlmost two years after their formation, the Grays Harbor Volunteer Search and Rescue is now officially a non-profit 501c3 recognized by the IRS. Current president, Sara Owen tells us “We were so excited to get that determination letter from the IRS. It means we’ll be able to fundraise, and ask companies for donations for gear and equipment and so many things that we really need.” The all-volunteer group consists of about 75 first responders, police, and community members throughout the county.
A 9-member crew from the group rescued a woman with a leg injury that had hiked 9 miles into the Olympic National Park over the Memorial day weekend. She had to be transported about seven miles on a one-wheeled stretcher.Owen recounted “I can’t even describe the level of difficulty that it took for those people to bring her out in a stokes basket. These people are incredibly dedicated individuals who train really hard and really take it seriously. I couldn’t be more proud to be associated with this group.”
The GHVSAR team will elect new leadership at their regular meeting tonight. Owen said they are always looking for new volunteers from first responders to loud-mouthed radio personalities, for details visit www.ghvsar.org

River threatens building in Olympic National Park

PORT ANGELES, Wash. (AP) — Olympic National Park says the shifting Quinault River has come within a foot-and-a-half of undercutting the historic Enchanted Valley Chalet…. …read more

From: AP Washington News

    

Coast Guard rescues injured hiker in Olympic National Park

SEATTLE — A rescue aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles, Wash., rescued a 60-year-old male that reportedly suffered a broken ankle while hiking in Olympic National Park near Starbuck Mine, Wash., Sunday afternoon.

A member of the U.S. Forest Service, who was on-scene with the man and rendered first aid, requested Coast Guard assistance through the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

The aircrew launched from Port Angeles aboard an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter at about 3:50 p.m., and was able to safely hoist the injured man aboard. The aircrew transported the man back to Air Station Port Angeles, and transferred him in stable condition to waiting emergency medical services at about 5:30 p.m.

EMS transported the man to Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles.

Conservative group says Olympic National Park has lost $3 million in first 10 days of federal shutdown

Finnerty added: “The only thing that would be crazier than shutting down America’s national parks would be for Congress to allow wide open access to the parks without NPS’s dedicated and hardworking employees in place to protect the sites. By essentially enabling looting, poaching, and vandalism, Congress would be taking what is already a dark episode in the history of our national parks and making it worse, including the theft or destruction of national treasures of incalculable value.”

The following is CNPSR-gathered data for the lost visitors, visitor spending, and jobs at risk for 12 leading national parks across the U.S.:

* Acadia National Park (Maine) – 68,493 lost visitors in first 10 days, $5,263,013 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 3331 total jobs at stake, including 3147 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Badlands National Park (South Dakota) – 26,767 lost visitors in first 10 days, $656,986 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 475 total jobs at stake, including 375 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Boston National Historic Park (Massachusetts) – 54,794 lost visitors in first 10 days, $2,032,876 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 1019 total jobs at stake, including 904 non-NPS jobs.

* Cuyahoga Valley National Park (Ohio) – 68,219 lost visitors in first 10 days, $1,545,205 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 819 total jobs at stake, including 599 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Everglades National Park (Florida) – 25,083 lost visitors in first 10 days, $3,857,534 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 2364 total jobs at stake, including 1951 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Gettysburg National Military Park (Pennsylvania) – 27,397 lost visitors in first 10 days, $1,796,712 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 1141 total jobs at stake, including 1051 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Glacier National Park (Montana) – 60,273 lost visitors in first 10 days, $3,076,712 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 1994 total jobs at stake, including 1632 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona) – 120,000 lost visitors in first 10 days, $11,750,684 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 6825 total jobs at stake, including 6167 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Great Smoky Mountains National Park (North Carolina and Tennessee) – 257,534 lost visitors in first 10 days, $23,123,287 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 11,766 total jobs at stake, including 11,367 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Olympic National Park (Washington) – 77,808 lost visitors in first 10 days, $2,912,328 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 1673 total jobs at stake, including 1395 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Rocky Mountain National Park (Colorado) – 80,821 lost visitors in first 10 days, $4,821,917 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 3033 total jobs at stake, including 2641 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho) – 98,630 lost visitors in first 10 days, $9,452,054 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 5572 total jobs at stake, including 4481 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Yosemite National Park (California) – 106,849 lost visitors in first 10 days, $10,021,917 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 5607 total jobs at stake, including 4602 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Zion National Park (Utah) – 72,876 lost visitors in first 10 days, $3,495,890 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 2401 total jobs at stake, including 2136 local/non-NPS jobs.

A note on data: Visitation, economic impacts, and job numbers for the 12 parks are drawn from Headwaters Economics, “Land and Communities, National Parks Service Units, Economic Impacts of Visitation and Expenditures” at http://headwaterseconomics.org/apps-public/nps/impacts/. Topline numbers for NPS daily visitation provided by Coalition of National Park Service Retirees using National Park Service data. 

ABOUT CNPSR

The over 900 members of the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees are all former employees of the National Park Service with a combined 25,000 years of stewardship of America’s most precious natural and cultural resources. In their personal lives, CNPSR members reflect the broad spectrum of skills and expertise that distinguished their National Park Service careers. CNPSR members now strive to apply their credibility and integrity as they speak out for national park solutions that uphold law and apply sound science. The Coalition counts among its members: former national park deputy directors, regional directors, superintendents, rangers and other career professionals who devoted an average of nearly 30 years each to protecting and interpreting America’s national parks on behalf of the public. For more information, visit the CNPSR Web site at:

http://www.npsretirees.org

Coast Guard rescues teenage hiker from Olympic National Park

SEATTLE, Wash. – The U.S. Coast Guard medevac’d a 15-year old hiker after she fell from a 15-foot cliff north of the Hoh River in Olympic National Park, in Clallam, Wash., Monday.

The hiker was reported in stable condition.

At approximately 10:46 a.m., watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound in Seattle received a request from National Park Service employees to rescue a fallen hiker.

The hiker, an Idaho native visiting the park on a school field trip, had reportedly fallen head-first onto a beach and was in-and out-of consciousness.

The duty flight surgeon from Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles, Wash., spoke with National Park Service rangers and agreed to perform the medevac.

A HH-65 Dolphin crew arrived on scene and lowered a rescue swimmer. The girl was hoisted aboard the Dolphin at approximately 1:12 p.m. and taken to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

Coast Guard rescues stranded hikers in Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park, through the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center, requested the Coast Guard medically evacuate the hiker just before 11 a.m. 

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew was launched from Air Station Port Angeles, Wash., at approximately 12:09 p.m. 

Another Coast Guard helicopter, an MH-60 Jayhawk from Coast Guard Air Station Astoria, Ore., was conducting aids to navigation in the vicinity of Port Ludlow, Wash. The crew was diverted to assist in the rescue, if needed, and act as a communications platform.

The Dolphin helicopter crew arrived on scene and lowered a rescue swimmer and a litter to transport the patient. It was then discovered by the crew that a second hiker, who had sustained minor injuries, was also in the ravine.

Both hikers were hoisted by the Dolphin crew and transported to Air Station Port Angeles. They were then taken by ambulance to the Olympic Memorial Hospital in Port Angeles.

Their conditions are unknown.

Olympic National Park personnel assisted in the rescue.