Family rescued from car on beach seconds before waves roll it over

An Ocean Shores Police Officer rescued a Kent family from the surf this evening.

At about 6:54 pm today, Grays Harbor 911 received a report of a vehicle in the surf near the W. Chance ala Mer beach approach in Ocean Shores. The caller reported that a woman and an infant were still in the vehicle. Two other adults, a male and a female, were already out of the vehicle.

When Officer Watson arrived on scene less than two minutes later, he found the car in the surf. An adult male was in the driver’s seat, with an older female and an infant in the passenger seat. The car had sunk into the wet sand, so the Officer had to force the door open to get the occupants out.

He helped the woman (who was carrying the six-month old baby) out of the car and started leading her up the beach. The male was able to get out on his own. The people were only about 20 feet from the car when another wave hit, lifting the car up and rolling it onto its top.

Other Officers arrived and helped the family of four get clear of the water. They were all checked on the scene by Ocean Shores Fire Department Paramedics and released.

The car had to be flipped over by a bulldozer, then it was removed from the beach by a tow truck.

The driver told Officers that the family was driving on the beach in their brand new Infinity, when they stopped at the edge of the surf to look at the water. The tires sank into the wet sand, so they were unable to drive away when the waves began pounding the car.

Eight days of morning razor clam digs approved, starting April 17 on Long Beach, Twin Harbors, and Mocrocks

Razor clam diggers can return to coastal beaches starting Friday, April 17, state shellfish managers announced today.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams on those beaches are safe to eat. All of the digs are scheduled on morning tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, noted that the upcoming dig coincides with the Long Beach Razor Clam Festival, scheduled April 18-19 in Long Beach. Festival events range from free clam-digging lessons to a fritter cook-off. More information is available at http://longbeachrazorclamfestival.com/

Under state law, diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches, and low tides:

  • April 17, Friday, 6:03 a.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks 
  • April 18, Saturday, 6:52 a.m.; -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis 
  • April 19, Sunday, 7:39 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis 
  • April 20, Monday, 8:25 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 21, Tuesday, 9:11 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 22, Wednesday, 9:57 a.m.; -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 23, Thursday, 10:46 a.m.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 24, Friday, 11:38 a.m.; 0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors

WDFW has also proposed additional digs in May, pending the results of future marine toxin tests. Tentative dates for those digs are posted on the department’s website at wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2015-16 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

During all upcoming digs, state wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula, and on a section of Twin Harbors beach.

The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and “horns.”

To protect these birds, the department asks that clam diggers avoid the dunes and areas of the beach with soft, dry sand. When driving to a clam-digging area, diggers should enter the beach only at designated access points and stay on the hard-packed sand near or below the high tide line.

Raid on suspected drug house in Ocean Shores nets three arrests

Serving a search warrant last week on a suspected drug house in Ocean Shores netted 3 arrests. Police Chief Mike Styner tells us On Thursday, April 9th, Officers from the Ocean Shores Police Department, the Hoquiam Police Department and Deputies from the Grays Harbor County Sheriff’s Department served a search warrant on a suspected drug house in the 800 block of San Antonio Court NE in Ocean Shores.

During a search of the premises narcotics, paraphernalia, and packaging materials were located and seized. A vehicle belonging to the resident was seized. The 48 year old female resident was arrested and booked into the Grays Harbor County Jail for Violation of the Uniform Controlled Substance Act and two outstanding warrants.

A 31 year old transient male found inside the residence was arrested on an outstanding warrant out of the Grays Harbor County Sheriff’s Office and booked into the Grays Harbor County jail. In addition, a 27 year old Ocean Shores man was arrested and booked into the Hoquiam Jail for outstanding warrants out of Department of Corrections and the Thurston County Sheriff’s Office.

Ocean Shores home burglaries on the rise, public asked for help

The City of Ocean Shores has been hit by a string of burglaries over the past few weeks, and now they’re asking for the public’s help.

Chief Mike Styner said so far this year, the department has investigated 29 burglaries. Most of the burglaries have occurred at unoccupied vacation homes. Losses have included mostly small items and several large flat-screen televisions. Entry has been mostly through damaged doors and windows.

The Ocean Shores Police Department is conducting intensive patrols throughout the City, but we are also asking everyone to report any suspicious activity they observe.

Please call the dispatch center at (360) 533-8765.

At this time in 2014, the Ocean Shores Police Department had investigated 14 reported burglaries, while in 2013 there were 44 burglaries investigated by this date.

Public comments sought on Weatherwax Wetland and Habitat Mitigation Bank in Ocean Shores

The city of Ocean Shores is getting into the Mitigation Banking business the Department of Ecology is accepting public comment on certification of the Weatherwax Wetland and Habitat Mitigation Bank.
The city has been working on forming a mitigation bank on the 120 acres of wetlands since 2011, certification would finalize the process and permanently preserve the property. With projected revenues of over a million dollars, the Department of Ecology projects to award almost 12 credits for mitigation on the property.

Continue reading Public comments sought on Weatherwax Wetland and Habitat Mitigation Bank in Ocean Shores

U.S. Coast Guard crews rescue man and his dog near Ocean City

Imagery available: Coast Guard rescues man, dog near Ocean City, Wash. A Coast Guard helicopter crew assisted local search and rescue personnel in locating a lost man and his dog near Ocean City, Washington, Sunday.

An MH-60 Jayhawk aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Astoria safely hoisted and transported both the Ocean City man and dog to Ocean Shores Airport in good condition, where they were met by Grays Harbor County Sheriff’s deputies.

Grays Harbor county SAR personnel began searching for the 60-year-old man around 5 p.m., but were unable to locate him.  Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Columbia River, in Warrenton, received a request for assistance from Grays Harbor County at about 9:20 p.m., after the man’s cell phone reportedly died and he had no other means of communication.

The aircrew located the man and dog at about 11:15 p.m., after searching in concert with Grays Harbor County SAR ground crews for about two hours. Search personnel on the ground relayed the man’s last known location to the aircrew. Coast Guard personnel used night vision goggles and forward looking infrared cameras to search for the man’s heat signature in the swampy terrain.

“The hiker was using an old lighter that would not light but would spark,” said Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Leary, the rescue pilot aboard the Jayhawk. “Through night vision goggles it looked like a flashlight.”

The Coast Guard recommends all hikers and outdoor enthusiasts carry a form of communication more reliable than a cell phone when venturing into the wilderness.

The weather was reported as overcast with visibility ranging from five to 20 miles.

Randy Peck – Concerned Ocean Shores resident

Randy talks hot topics, although he said he wasn’t really “fired up” about anything specific.

Hands-free and distracted driving

Open topics, and fixing the Indiana law.

The Dunes, and protecting Ocean Shores from the Fourth of July celebrations.

New tsunami evacuation maps in Spanish will help coastal communities

New tsunami evacuation maps will help the Hispanic populations of Grays Harbor and Pacific counties learn the best routes to take in order to safely reach a designated assembly area on high ground. The brochures also offer critical safety information in Spanish to help communities understand what a tsunami is as well as preparedness tips. The brochures have been available in English for some time.

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Map shows destinations in the Aberdeen and Hoquiam areas. It’s been available in English for some time, but was recently produced in Spanish.

Following a 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan in 2011, the devastating four-story tall Tohoku tsunami killed thousands in Japan on March 11, 2011. At the same time, a tsunami advisory was issued for the coast of Washington, but the largest wave was only expected to reach a foot or two over normal sea level. As a precaution, however, residents in several coastal communities were asked to move to higher ground.

But there were several non-English speaking residents who chose to evacuate to nearby hospitals and other critical facilities instead of high ground or officially designated assembly areas. These spontaneous evacuations to essential facilities caused great concern for hospital staff, emergency managers and first responders. It was subsequently identified that there was a shortfall in localized tsunami preparedness materials accessible to non-English speaking populations.

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Map shows destinations in the northern Pacific County. It’s been available in English for some time, but was recently produced in Spanish.

According to U.S. Census Bureau data from 2013, people identifying themselves as Hispanic or Latino within Grays Harbor County account for 9.6 percent of the total population. Within Pacific County, that figure is approximately 8.8 percent. Having recognized the evacuation issues during the 2011 Tohoku tsunami, the Washington State Tsunami Program successfully applied for funding through the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program to create tsunami outreach and preparedness products accessible to non-English speaking coastal populations. The first product of this new series includes tsunami evacuation brochures in Spanish. With funding from the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program, and working in close coordination with the Washington State Department of Natural Resources and a specialized translation company, the Washington State Tsunami Program successfully produced the first Spanish tsunami evacuation brochures for the Washington’s Pacific Ocean coast.

Maps in both English and Spanish can be downloaded here: http://mil.wa.gov/tsunami

There are maps translated into Spanish for the communities of Aberdeen, Hoquiam, Cosmopolis, Ocean City, Copalis Beach, Pacific Beach, Moclips, Ocean Shores,Westport, Grayland, Bay Center, Long Beach, Ilwaco, Ocean Park, Raymond, South Bend, North Cove, Tokeland and many unincorporated areas.

Razor Clam dig approved November 4th through November 11th

Clam diggers can return to coastal beaches starting Tuesday, Nov. 4, to dig razor clams during the first of two planned openings in November.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the latest round of evening digs after marine toxin test results showed the clams are safe to eat. Digging is not allowed on any beach before noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said the best digging typically occurs one to two hours before low tide.

“With daylight saving time ending Sunday, diggers will have even less daylight to dig by and should bring lanterns or headlamps,” Ayres said.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Digging days and evening low tides during the upcoming opening are:

  • Nov. 4, Tuesday; 4:26 p.m., -0.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 5, Wednesday; 5:14 p.m., -0.7 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 6, Thursday; 5:59 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 7, Friday; 6:42 p.m., -1.2 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 8, Saturday; 7:24 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • Nov. 9, Sunday; 8:05 p.m., -0.7 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 10, Monday; 8:47 p.m., -0.3 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 11, Tuesday; 9:31 p.m., 0.2 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors

 

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state. A WDFW video, which demonstrates how to teach your kids to harvest razor clams, is available at http://youtu.be/gl9p_PparVk.

Ayres suggested that diggers also should check the forecast before heading out to the beaches.

 

“Clamming has been good when the weather hasn’t chased diggers away,” he said.

 

WDFW also has proposed another dig in November, tentatively set to begin Nov. 20 if marine toxin tests are favorable. That dig is tentatively scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

 

  • Nov. 20, Thursday; 5:06 p.m., 0.0 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 21, Friday; 5:45 p.m., -0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 22, Saturday; 6:24 p.m., -0.8 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • Nov. 23, Sunday; 7:05 p.m., -1.0 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 24, Monday; 7:47 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 25, Tuesday; 8:32 p.m., -0.9 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 26, Wednesday; 9:19 p.m., -0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors

 

Comprehensive information about razor clams – from updates on tentative digs to how-to advice on digging and cooking – is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

No injuries, minor damages after small electrical fire at North Beach High School

A small electrical fire at North Beach High School this afternoon apparently started in a motor used to move the wall in their gym. The Ocean Shores Fire Department reports they responded after 1 P.M. Tuesday to the report of smoke at the school. The Grays Harbor PUD also reported a power outage in the area at the same time. Ocean Shores Fire crews checked the area and found only minor damage to the motor, no injuries were reported. The Grays Harbor PUD restored power just after 2:30 today.