Crude by rail in Washington State

New Rule Will Require Notice of Oil Movement by Rail and Pipeline in Washington State

OLYMPIA –As early as next year, companies transporting oil into or through Washington could be required to improve planning for accidents under new regulations being developed by the Washington Department of Ecology. The Washington State Department of Ecology is beginning a new rulemaking process to create “Chapter 173-185 WAC, Oil Movement by Rail and Pipeline […]

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  • Crude by rail in Washington State

    Public invited to comment on oil transportation study

    The public is invited to provide feedback on a preliminary study assessing risks associated with increased transportation of oil through Washington state. Public meetings are scheduled next week in Spokane and Olympia to accept comments regarding the study and recommendations.   The Marine & Rail Oil Transport Study: Preliminary Findings & Recommendations, released Oct. 1, […]

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  • Memory chip makers will pay $173 million for price-fixing

    SEATTLE – The Y2K bug was the big concern in the computer world when makers of DRAM computer memory conspired to raise prices. More than a decade later, the companies and a group of state attorneys general have negotiated a $173 million antitrust settlement in principle with six of the world’s top manufacturers.

    “This settlement will make up for some of the harm caused by memory chip manufacturers who conspired to drive up computer costs,” Washington Attorney General Rob McKenna said. “The agreement will also prohibit the companies from manipulating prices in the future.”

    Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) is a common form of memory chip found in computers, servers, printers and other electronics.

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  • Washington State Ranked 7th Among “Energy Efficient”

    WASHINGTON, D.C. (October 21, 2009): The current economic downturn is not sidetracking state-level efforts to make the most of energy efficiency as the cheapest, cleanest and quickest of all energy resources, according to a 50-state scorecard on energy efficiency policies, programs, and practices from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE).

    The 2009 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard, which ranks states in six categories, concludes that the 10 states doing the most to implement energy efficiency are: California (1); Massachusetts (2); Connecticut (3); Oregon (4); New York (5); Vermont (6); Washington state (7); Minnesota (8); Rhode Island (9); and Maine (10).

    "By embracing a wide range of cost-effective energy efficiency strategies, the leading states are demonstrating that efficiency is their ’first fuel’ to meet energy demands while growing their economies," said Maggie Eldridge, ACEEE research associate and lead author of the report. "States continue to raise the bar with comprehensive strategies to improve efficiency in their buildings, industry, and transportation systems. They are the ‘living laboratories’ of energy efficiency."

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  • Wash. pulls permits for 2 oil train terminals

    HOQUIAM (AP) – Officials are rejecting permits for two major oil-train terminals in Southwest Washington after deciding the projects should face more environmental scrutiny.

    The state Shorelines Hearings Board issued a letter Wednesday saying it plans to invalidate the permits for Westway Terminal Co. and Imperium Terminal Services, which want to build oil shipping terminals at the Port of Grays Harbor that could store up to 1.5 million barrels of crude from North Dakota and Alberta. The city of Hoquiam issued the permits last spring, after determining in conjunction with the state Ecology Department that the proposals posed minimal threat to the environment.

    Groups including the Quinalt Indian Nation and the Sierra Club appealed. They argued that city and state officials failed to consider the cumulative environmental impacts of having the two terminals running along with a third terminal planned nearby. The board agreed.

    The board also says the effects of increased train and vessel traffic need to be considered, as does the damage that could be posed by an oil spill.

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  • State-federal settlement bars LifeLock from claiming it can prevent identity theft

    SEATTLE – LifeLock – the identity theft prevention provider whose CEO published his Social Security number in advertisements – can no longer claim its services protect consumers from all forms of identity theft.

    “The states and Federal Trade Commission picked apart LifeLock’s claims and alleged the company couldn’t deliver on its promises,” Attorney General Rob McKenna said. “Today’s agreement deadbolts LifeLock’s ability to claim its services eliminate the risk of identity theft.”

    A group of 34 state attorneys general joined the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) today in announcing an agreement with LifeLock, under which the Tempe, Ariz.-based company will pay $11 million in restitution to consumers. Although the FTC and state attorneys general share jurisdiction to investigate unfair and deceptive practices against consumers, a joint enforcement action of this magnitude is unprecedented.

    Each year, about 8 million Americans, including 5,000 Washington residents, become victims of identity theft or identity fraud. Given these alarming statistics, attorneys general said consumers are looking for ways to protect themselves and their pocketbooks.

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