Search for missing hiker in Olympic National Park ends when hikers walks out Monday

UPDATE: Kelly Hall arrived in the area of the Elwha Ranger Station shortly before 10:00 a.m. Monday, safe and well and contacted a park employee.
“We are overjoyed to have this search reach a successful and happy conclusion,” said Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum.
Searchers who contributed to the effort include National Park Service employees and volunteers, an aircraft and crew from Washington State Patrol, and volunteers from Olympic Mountain Rescue, Clallam County Search and Rescue and German Shepherd Search Dogs.

 

 

A helicopter and tracking dogs have been added to the search efforts for a hiker overdue in Olympic National Park. Authorities say 64-year-old Kelly Hall is three days overdue from his planned six-day, 39 mile hike in the northeast corner of the park. Hall was scheduled to meet family members Thursday. When he didn’t show up, they reported him missing that night.
The second day of searching for 64-year old Kelly Hall of Bainbridge Island continued Sunday, but revealed few clues regarding the missing hiker’s location. Hall was reported overdue Thursday evening after failing to rendezvous with a family member as planned.

Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum renewed her appeal for the public’s assistance. “We are very interested in talking with hikers who were anywhere along Mr. Hall’s itinerary in the past week,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum. “Anyone who may have information helpful to the search is urged to call the park as soon as possible at 360-565-3120.”

Hall began his hike on Saturday, August 30, setting out from the Obstruction Point Trailhead near Hurricane Ridge. His planned itinerary was a 39-mile hike through Grand Valley to Grand Pass, continuing over Cameron Pass, through Dose Meadows, over Gray Wolf Pass and along the Gray Wolf Trail to the Slab Camp Trailhead on Forest Road 2875. He was reported overdue by a family member on Thursday evening when he did not appear as planned at the trailhead. Another hiking party reported having seen Hall on August 30 in Grand Valley, about four miles from his starting point.

Today’s search activities included:

· Sixteen ground searchers were in the field today, searching both trails and off-trail areas along or near Hall’s intended itinerary. About ten searchers are camped in the wilderness tonight and will resume search efforts Monday morning.

· Three search dog teams joined the search Saturday evening and continued their search today.

· An aerial search by helicopter was conducted this afternoon.

· Investigators attempted to make contact with the approximately 20 other hikers who had wilderness permits for about the same times and locations as Halls’ intended itinerary. One party reported having seen him on August 30 in Grand Valley, about four miles from his starting point.

An aircraft equipped with heat sensing forward-looking infrared (FLIR) equipment will fly over the search area before sunrise Monday morning. Continued ground and helicopter searching will begin shortly after.

Hall is described as being 6’5” tall and weighing 220 pounds. He has a blue backpack with a fishing pole and orange flip-flops strapped to the outside. An earlier description of his tent was inaccurate; Hall is believed to be using a dark gray netting tent with an orange floor and poles. It has a silver rain fly, so may appear either dark gray or silver, depending on whether the rain fly is in use.

Searchers include National Park Service employees and volunteers, and volunteers from Olympic Mountain Rescue, Clallam County Search and Rescue and German Shepherd Search Dogs.

Kelly Hall, 64 years old 6’5”, 220 pounds Overdue from six-day hike from Obstruction Point, to Grand Pass, Cameron Pass, Dose Meadows, Gray Wolf Pass. Planned to be picked up at Slab Camp Trailhead on USFS Road 2875 on Thursday September 4. • Blue backpack • Blue ‘Mountain Hardware’ stocking cap • Fishing pole and orange flip flops strapped to outside of pack • Believed to be using a blue-gray tent Anyone who has seen Hall since August 30, please call Olympic National Park at 360-565-3120.
Kelly Hall, 64 years old
6’5”, 220 pounds
Overdue from six-day hike from Obstruction Point, to Grand Pass, Cameron Pass, Dose Meadows, Gray Wolf Pass. Planned to be picked up at Slab Camp Trailhead on USFS Road 2875 on Thursday September 4.
• Blue backpack
• Blue ‘Mountain Hardware’ stocking cap
• Fishing pole and orange flip flops strapped to outside of pack
• Believed to be using a blue-gray tent
Anyone who has seen Hall since August 30, please call Olympic National Park at 360-565-3120.

Process to move Chalet in Olympic National Park begins, Enchanted Valley closed to camping September 1-14

The complicated process of moving a historic two-story building about 50 feet begins today, complicated because the Enchanted Valley Chalet in the Olympic National Park is 13 miles from any developed roads.
Jeff Monroe of Monroe House Moving tells us crews and pack mules are hiking in Wednesday, lifting on Saturday and should start moving late Saturday or first thing Sunday. Helicopter flys on Thursday and Friday weather permitting.
The Parks Service has closed the Enchanted Valley to camping for the first two weeks of September to accommodate crews working in the park.

Monroe House Moving, Inc. of Sequim, Washington has been awarded the contract to move the building.  The contractor plans to complete the relocation operation by mid-September, weather permitting. 

To protect contractor and visitor safety, Enchanted Valley will be closed to all public camping for the duration of the project, September 1 through 14.  

Hikers and stock users may continue to travel through the valley, but between September 1 and September 14, must be escorted by park staff.  The camping closure and escort-only hiking restriction extends from the steel bridge at the downstream end of Enchanted Valley (mile 13 on the East Fork Quinault River Trail) to one mile upriver of the chalet. 

The Graves Creek Stock Camp (located near the Graves Creek trailhead) will also be closed between September 1 and 14 to accommodate stock animals and handlers involved in transporting supplies and equipment during the project. 

“Visitor, employee and contractor safety is our top priority,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum.  “Moving a two-story structure is inherently risky. We appreciate the public’s patience and cooperation during the process of relocating the chalet.” 

Using industry standard house-moving techniques, the contractor will move the Enchanted Valley Chalet a distance of 50 to 100 feet from its current location where it is undercut and in danger of collapsing into the East Fork Quinault River.  The threats to natural and wilderness resources posed by the structure collapsing into the river warrant temporary relocation of the building.  Additionally, preventing the chalet from imminent collapse will allow time to examine and plan for the long-term future of the structure. 

The chalet relocation project was examined in the “Emergency Action to Temporarily Relocate the Enchanted Valley Chalet for the Protection of the East Fork Quinault River Environmental Assessment” (EA) and a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) was issued on July 25. 

The National Park Service is charged with protecting all of Olympic National Park’s priceless resources, from historic structures to fish, to the unique and irreplaceable character of the Olympic Wilderness. 

The Enchanted Valley Chalet is located 13 miles from the nearest road, deep within the Olympic Wilderness.  The chalet was constructed by Quinault Valley residents in the early 1930s, prior to establishment of Olympic National Park.  The chalet served for several decades as a backcountry lodge and more recently, as a wilderness ranger station and emergency shelter.  The chalet was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.    

Photos shared by park visitors in early January showed that the main channel of the East Fork Quinault River had migrated to within 18 inches of the 1930s-era chalet.  Last winter’s storms and high flows resulted in the Quinault’s main channel continuing to shift by at least 15 feet.   Recent photographs show that the river has undercut the building by approximately eight feet.  

Migration of the East Fork Quinault’s channel is common in the loose, unconsolidated soils of Enchanted Valley.  Storms, fallen trees, rockslides and simply the constant process of erosion can all cause the river to shift and carve a new channel. 

The EA and the FONSI, along with other supporting documents, are available for review at http://www.parkplanning.nps.gov/EVCEA.  

Unmanned Aircraft Use banned from Olympic National Park

Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of Olympic National Park is prohibited except as approved in writing by the superintendent.

“The use of unmanned aircraft would create unacceptable safety risks to park visitors, as well as impacts to visitor experience and enjoyment of the natural sights and sounds of Olympic National Park,”  said Sarah Creachbaum, Olympic National Park Superintendent.  “Additionally, the Wilderness Act of 1964 prohibits the use of motorized equipment within designated wilderness, which comprises 95 percent of the park.”

The term “unmanned aircraft” means a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links). This term includes all types of devices that meet this definition (e.g., model airplanes, quadcopters, drones) that are used for any purpose, including for recreation or commerce.

More information about the closure and other Olympic National Park regulations is contained in the Superintendent’s Compendium, available on the park’s website at http://www.nps.gov/olym/parkmgmt/upload/2014-Compendium-signed_20140818155824-1.pdf

Kilmer, Heck Announce National Heritage Site on the West Coast

TACOMA, WA – Representatives Derek Kilmer (WA-06) and Denny Heck (WA-10) joined local officials to announce a bill to create the first national heritage site on the West Coast. Their legislation would establish a National Maritime Heritage Area in Washington state – the only one in the country focused on maritime history. Following the announcement the group also toured the Foss Waterway Seaport.

Congress has designated 49 areas across the country as National Heritage Areas to promote local economic growth and preserve sites and landmarks with cultural and historical significance. After being approved by Congress each area is managed by local officials, with no new regulatory authority over management or preservation given to the National Park Service.

“From fishermen to shipbuilders, the maritime economy has been central to our region for generations,” said Kilmer. “We take pride in how rich this history is. Traveling along our coast you’ll find unique stories about our tribal heritage, fishing economy, and even boundary disputes. Today, we’re shining a spotlight on our maritime traditions in the hopes of reminding future generations of how important our ties to the water are while bringing in visitors from across the nation that will support tourism businesses. This bill seeks to maintain these national treasures through local control so they don’t fade away and would not have happened without a grassroots campaign to secure a heritage designation. I look forward to continuing to work with local communities to create this area.”

“Not only will the establishment of a maritime heritage area encourage people to learn about this special place, but to also visit and experience its brilliance in person,” said Heck. “This designation will also preserve the area for many generations to enjoy our region well into the future.”

 

What are National Heritage Areas?

info sheet imageNational Heritage Areas (NHAs) are designated by Congress as places where natural, cultural, and historic resources combine to form a cohesive, nationally important landscape. Through their resources, NHAs are a grassroots, community-driven approach to heritage conservation and economic development. Through public-private partnerships, NHA entities support historic preservation, natural resource conservation, recreation, heritage tourism, and educational projects. Leveraging funds and long-term support for projects, NHA partnerships foster pride of place and an enduring stewardship ethic.

 

Spring Forward at Lake Quinault Lodge With Special $99 Rate

Warmer temperatures, stunningly green plants and trees and the most beautiful time of year in the rain forest all represent Springtime on the Olympic Peninsula.  Lake Quinault Lodge celebrates this fantastic time of year with special rates, numerous events and activities that will continue throughout the summer. All events are open to the public and may require reservations. For more information visit, olympicnationalparks.com or call (800) 562-6672.

April 19, 9 a.m – 4 p.m.: Earth Day Volunteer Vacation

Lake Quinault Lodge, National Park Service and Home Depot of Aberdeen are inviting the public to help celebrate Earth Day by volunteering their time to improve and preserve the Maple Glade Trail and Kestner Homestead on the North shore of the lake.  Volunteers will lop brush, clean foot-bridges and work on the historic Kestner Homestead. All ages are welcome, lunch and tools will be provided. Volunteers are asked to bring work gloves, work shoes/boots, rain gear, camera and a great attitude!  Special room rates are available or free campsite for volunteers.  Contact Sandra Miller, miller-sandra2@aramark.com.

April 20, 10 a.m.: Easter Brunch, Egg Coloring and Egg Hunt

Enjoy Easter Sunday Brunch in the Roosevelt Dining Room.  Offerings include dishes such as Breakfast Casserole, Chicken Boursin, Mushroom and Spinach Fritatta, Sweet Potato Hash, a variety of pastries and more.

In addition, at 10 a.m. the Easter Bunny will be helping kids color eggs to take home and gear up for the annual Easter Egg Hunt that begins at noon. One area will be for ages 5 and under while another for ages 6 to 12 years.  There will be one Golden Egg for each group and the kid that finds it will win an Easter basket full of goodies, presented by the Easter Bunny himself.

May 11, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Mother’s Day Brunch

Treat Mom to delicious Pacific Northwest cuisine in the Roosevelt Dining Room as she admires the panoramic views of the mountains and lake. Mom’s can also take a free rainforest tour beginning at 9:30 a.m. ($33 value).

June 13-15, 5-9 p.m. Father’s Day Beer Fest

Each night the weekend of Father’s Day, Dads will be treated  to outstanding cuisine in the Roosevelt Dining room. The menu includes such dad favorites as the lodge burger and a 16oz ribeye steak.

What can be done to save the Historic Enchanted Valley Chalet in the Olympic National Park?

The Enchanted Valley Chalet in the Olympic National Park is reaching a tipping point, 13 miles above the Graves Creek trail head in the Quinault Valley, the historic chalet is loosing ground to the the East Fork of the Quinault River.

Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum said they are reviewing what can be done, however “One thing that’s off the table right now would be going in and inserting [inaudible] into the bank. The bank is a 12 foot vertical and it is inside the wilderness boundary, and we are directed by law to let natural processes run so that’s a little bit tricky.”

The National Parks Department said the river has shifted toward the home by at least 15 feet in the past three months, and as of late last week was undercutting the chalet by about four feet.

The National Park Service said earlier this month that as it has for many years, the main channel of the East Fork Quinault River has continued to move across the Enchanted Valley floodplain this winter, further eroding the river bank and undermining the 1930s-era Enchanted Valley Chalet.

This winter’s storms and high flows have resulted in the Quinault’s main channel shifting by at least 15 feel in the past three months.  As of late last week, the river had undercut the chalet by approximately four feet.

“Within what is technically and economically feasible, we continue to do our very best to protect the area’s natural and cultural resources and its wilderness character,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum.  “Our options are limited, however, given the size and force of the river and the valley’s remote location within the Olympic Wilderness.”

An Olympic National Park crew recently returned from Enchanted VAlley, where they assessed and documented the Chalet’s condition and removed equipment, supplies and hazardous materials.  The building’s windows were also removed to both prevent glass from impacting the river and downstream natural resources and to preserve elements of the historic building.

Park staff continues to work closely with partners to develop the best course of action, both in the long and short term.  Key partners include the Washington State Historic Preservation Officer, Pacific West Regional Office of the National Park Service and concerned organizations and citizens.

“We understand that the Chalet occupies an important place in the history of this area, and we know that people hold deep regard and affection for the building,” said Creachbaum.  “We invite anyone who’d like to share photos or memories of the Chalet to post them on our Olympic National Park Facebook page.”

The park’s Facebook page is found at https://www.facebook.com/OlympicNPS.  The page, including a new album of Enchanted Valley photos, is visible to anyone with internet access.  People must have a Facebook profile in order to post their own photos and memories, however.

In early January, photographs and visitor reports revealed that the Quinault River had migrated to within 18 inches of the building.  Subsequent aerial photos illustrated the river’s continued movement toward the chalet.

Migration of the East Fork Quinault’s channel is common particularly in the loose, unconsolidated soils of Enchanted Valley.  Storms, fallen trees, rockslides and simply the constant process of erosion can all cause the river to shift and carve a new channel.

Located 13 miles up trail from the Graves Creek trailhead in Quinault Valley, the chalet was build by Quinault Valley residents in the early 1930s, prior to establishment of Olympic Natiaonal Park.  It served as a lodge for hikers and horse riders until the early 1940s.

Enchanted Valley is within the Olympic Wilderness, designated in 1988, and is a popular wilderness destination.  More recently, the chalet has been used as a backcountry ranger station and emergency hikers’ shelter.  The chalet was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.

Public meeting tonight on Wilderness Stewardship Plan for Olympic National Park

The public comment period opened earlier this month on a Wilderness Stewardship Plan in the Olympic National Park.
The National Park Service reports four alternatives are being discussed, a public meeting has been set for March 26th from 5 – 7pm at the Lake Quinault School to detail the options.

The no action alternative (Alternative A), is defined as the continuation of existing management practices. This alternative is required by law to be considered during the planning process. It sets a baseline of existing impacts continued into the future against which to compare impacts of the other alternatives.

There are also 3 action alternatives identified as Alternatives B, C, and D. The action alternatives must all be consistent with the various laws, regulations, and policies that guide management of the park. In addition, all of the alternatives would protect the qualities of wilderness character as required by the Wilderness Act of 1964.

Rabbit hole:

Olympic National Park » Olympic National Park Wilderness Stewardship Plan » Document List »Document Contents

Document Content:
ONP_WSP_Draft_Zones_FULL_TABLE.pdfONP_WSP_Draft_Zones_FULL_TABLE.pdf   (244.7 KB, PDF file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_B.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_B.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_C.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_C.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_D.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_D.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
Disclaimer: Links within the above document(s) were valid as of the date published.

Public comment period opens on Wilderness Stewardship Plan for Olympic National Park

The public comment period opened yesterday on Wilderness Stewardship Plan in the Olympic National Park.
The National Park Service reports four alternatives are being discussed, a public meeting has been set for March 26th from 5 – 7pm at the Lake Quinault School to detail the options.

The no action alternative (Alternative A), is defined as the continuation of existing management practices. This alternative is required by law to be considered during the planning process. It sets a baseline of existing impacts continued into the future against which to compare impacts of the other alternatives.

There are also 3 action alternatives identified as Alternatives B, C, and D. The action alternatives must all be consistent with the various laws, regulations, and policies that guide management of the park. In addition, all of the alternatives would protect the qualities of wilderness character as required by the Wilderness Act of 1964.

Rabbit hole:

Olympic National Park » Olympic National Park Wilderness Stewardship Plan » Document List »Document Contents

Document Content:
ONP_WSP_Draft_Zones_FULL_TABLE.pdfONP_WSP_Draft_Zones_FULL_TABLE.pdf   (244.7 KB, PDF file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_B.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_B.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_C.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_C.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
ONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_D.jpgONP_WSP_Wilderness_Zones_Alt_D.jpg   (1.3 MB, Image file)
Disclaimer: Links within the above document(s) were valid as of the date published.

Free Days at Washington State Parks this weekend

OLYMPIA – Washington State Parks announces Sunday, Jan. 19 and Monday, Jan. 20 are the first of 12 “free days” in 2014 when visitors are not required to display the Discover Pass to visit a state park.

The “free days” are in keeping with legislation that created the Discover Pass, a $30 annual or $10 one-day permit required on state-managed recreation lands managed by Washington State Parks, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Department of Natural Resources. The Discover Pass legislation provided that State Parks could designate up to 12 “free days” when the pass would not be required to visit state parks. The free days apply only at state parks; the Discover Pass is still required to access DFW and DNR lands. The 2014 State Parks free days are as follows:

January 19 and 20 – in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day
• March 19 – Washington State Parks birthday
• April 19 – A spring Saturday “free day”
• April 22 – Earth Day
• May 11 – A spring Sunday “free day”
• June 7 and 8 – National Trails Day and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Free Fishing Weekend
• June 14 – National Get Outdoors Day
• August 25 – National Park Service birthday
• September 27 – National Public Lands Day
• November 11 – Veterans Day:

Discover Pass does not replace Sno-park permits required of visitors using winter recreation sites.

Stay connected to your state parks by following Washington State Parks at www.facebook.com/WashingtonStateParks, www.twitter.com/WaStatePks and www.youtube.com/WashingtonStateParks. Share your favorite state park adventure on the State Parks blog site at www.AdventureAwaits.com.

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission manages a diverse system of more than 100 state parks and recreation programs, including long-distance trails, boating safety and winter recreation. Washington State Parks turned 100 years old on March 19 and invites the public to join the celebration at events in parks all over the state, all year long. For more information, visit www.parks.wa.gov/events/.

Support state parks by purchasing your annual Discover Pass today, and enjoy a whole year of outdoor fun on Washington’s beautiful state-managed recreation lands. For more information, visit www.discoverpass.wa.gov.

Conservative group says Olympic National Park has lost $3 million in first 10 days of federal shutdown

Finnerty added: “The only thing that would be crazier than shutting down America’s national parks would be for Congress to allow wide open access to the parks without NPS’s dedicated and hardworking employees in place to protect the sites. By essentially enabling looting, poaching, and vandalism, Congress would be taking what is already a dark episode in the history of our national parks and making it worse, including the theft or destruction of national treasures of incalculable value.”

The following is CNPSR-gathered data for the lost visitors, visitor spending, and jobs at risk for 12 leading national parks across the U.S.:

* Acadia National Park (Maine) – 68,493 lost visitors in first 10 days, $5,263,013 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 3331 total jobs at stake, including 3147 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Badlands National Park (South Dakota) – 26,767 lost visitors in first 10 days, $656,986 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 475 total jobs at stake, including 375 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Boston National Historic Park (Massachusetts) – 54,794 lost visitors in first 10 days, $2,032,876 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 1019 total jobs at stake, including 904 non-NPS jobs.

* Cuyahoga Valley National Park (Ohio) – 68,219 lost visitors in first 10 days, $1,545,205 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 819 total jobs at stake, including 599 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Everglades National Park (Florida) – 25,083 lost visitors in first 10 days, $3,857,534 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 2364 total jobs at stake, including 1951 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Gettysburg National Military Park (Pennsylvania) – 27,397 lost visitors in first 10 days, $1,796,712 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 1141 total jobs at stake, including 1051 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Glacier National Park (Montana) – 60,273 lost visitors in first 10 days, $3,076,712 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 1994 total jobs at stake, including 1632 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona) – 120,000 lost visitors in first 10 days, $11,750,684 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 6825 total jobs at stake, including 6167 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Great Smoky Mountains National Park (North Carolina and Tennessee) – 257,534 lost visitors in first 10 days, $23,123,287 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 11,766 total jobs at stake, including 11,367 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Olympic National Park (Washington) – 77,808 lost visitors in first 10 days, $2,912,328 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 1673 total jobs at stake, including 1395 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Rocky Mountain National Park (Colorado) – 80,821 lost visitors in first 10 days, $4,821,917 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 3033 total jobs at stake, including 2641 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho) – 98,630 lost visitors in first 10 days, $9,452,054 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 5572 total jobs at stake, including 4481 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Yosemite National Park (California) – 106,849 lost visitors in first 10 days, $10,021,917 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 5607 total jobs at stake, including 4602 local/non-NPS jobs.

* Zion National Park (Utah) – 72,876 lost visitors in first 10 days, $3,495,890 lost visitor dollars in first 10 days, and 2401 total jobs at stake, including 2136 local/non-NPS jobs.

A note on data: Visitation, economic impacts, and job numbers for the 12 parks are drawn from Headwaters Economics, “Land and Communities, National Parks Service Units, Economic Impacts of Visitation and Expenditures” at http://headwaterseconomics.org/apps-public/nps/impacts/. Topline numbers for NPS daily visitation provided by Coalition of National Park Service Retirees using National Park Service data. 

ABOUT CNPSR

The over 900 members of the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees are all former employees of the National Park Service with a combined 25,000 years of stewardship of America’s most precious natural and cultural resources. In their personal lives, CNPSR members reflect the broad spectrum of skills and expertise that distinguished their National Park Service careers. CNPSR members now strive to apply their credibility and integrity as they speak out for national park solutions that uphold law and apply sound science. The Coalition counts among its members: former national park deputy directors, regional directors, superintendents, rangers and other career professionals who devoted an average of nearly 30 years each to protecting and interpreting America’s national parks on behalf of the public. For more information, visit the CNPSR Web site at:

http://www.npsretirees.org