Hoquiam cuts off non-trauma ambulance service to District 8 over fraud allegations

The City of Hoquiam has again cut off non-trauma ambulance service to Fire District 8 on the North shore. A letter was sent to the district, that serves the Moclips, Pacific Beach, Aloha and Seabrook areas yesterday terminating services on the basis of non-payment, and fraud.

City Administrator Brian Shay tells us the district notified them earlier this month that they did not plan to pay for ambulance services between July 12th and December 31st of last year on the basis that they had no written agreement in place. As we reported then, the city terminated services due to non-payment.

Shay said the district also fraudulently altered the written contract before both parties signed it, adding language that the city would never have agreed to.

The letter concluded “The city is very disappointed that a governmental entity would engage in unscrupulous acts of this nature in dealing with another governmental entity.”

Hoquiam letter to District 8

Razor clam dig approved, big bivalves await diggers on 4 coastal beaches

OLYMPIA – Plenty of fat clams await diggers who turn out for the next razor clam dig, set to run Feb. 26 through March 3 on various ocean beaches.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

As in previous openings, all digs are scheduled on evening tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said razor clams sampled in recent days are noticeably heavier than those tested earlier in the season. “With all the plankton in the water, the clams seem to be “fattening” up earlier than usual,” Ayres said. “Those clams will make for some tasty meals after the next opening.”

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • Feb. 26, Wednesday, 4:15 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Feb. 27, Thursday, 5:04 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • Feb. 28, Friday, 5:49 p.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 1, Saturday, 6:32 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • March 2, Sunday, 7:13 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 3, Monday, 7:53 p.m.; +0.3 feet; Twin Harbors
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Ayres noted that the beaches open for the greatest number of days are those with the most clams still available for harvest.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2013-14 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For updates on upcoming digs, see WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

Next razor clam dig set to begin January 28

OLYMPIA – Clam diggers can return to coastal beaches Tuesday (Jan. 28) through Sunday (Feb. 2) to dig razor clams during the last of three openings this month.

 

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the latest dig after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

As in previous openings, all digs are scheduled on evening tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

 

Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager, said conditions for the upcoming dig should be much better than during the last opening in mid-January.

 

“The surf has calmed down, and we have some excellent low tides this time around,” Ayres said. “Success rates should be much improved during the next opener.”

 

Upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

 

  • Jan. 28, Tuesday, 4:36 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Jan. 29, Wednesday, 5:25 p.m.; -1.2 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Jan. 30, Thursday, 6:11 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • Jan. 31, Friday, 6:55 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • Feb. 1, Saturday, 7:38 p.m.; -1.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • Feb. 2, Sunday, 8:20 p.m.; -0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

 

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

 

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2013-14 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

 

One additional razor clam dig is tentatively scheduled in late February during a season that is expected to extend into spring. For more information about upcoming digs, see WDFW’s razor clam webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

Taholah man dies in rollover wreck on State Route 109

A 38 year old Taholah man died early Saturday morning when his truck rolled off of State Route 109 in Moclips. The Washington State Patrol cites driving under the influence as the cause. Trevis Jones was pronounced dead at the scene, his passenger, a 47 year old Taholah man was transported to Community Hospital in Aberdeen with undisclosed injuries. Jones and his passenger were headed North on 109 when his 2012 Dodge truck left the road just after 2 Saturday morning, coming to rest on it’s top. The Washington State Department of Transportation reports the accident and investigation blocked traffic for about 2 hours.

Tragic end for one man after Thanksgiving day argument with family

HOQUIAM, Wash. – A Thanksgiving day argument ended in suicide last night in Hoquiam, after a 29 year old man allegedly pistol whipped a female family member then drove into town and shot himself. Sgt. Jeff Salstrom tells KBKW they responded to the home off of State Route 109 in Moclips just after 8 last night. Two assault victims said the man left with a handgun, heading toward Hoquiam. Salstrom spotted his vehicle on State Route 109 just before 9, as he pulled it over in the parking lot of the Hoquiam 7-11 he heard a loud-muffled sound from behind the tinted windows.
Once officers secured the scene and approached with a ballistics shield they broke out the driver’s side window to confirm the man had died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Two Hoquiam, and three Aberdeen police units responded, as well as Hoquiam fire and ambulance. Salstrom said the investigation is ongoing.

High winds and multiple outages in Grays Harbor County

ABERDEEN, Wash. – The Grays Harbor PUD has restored power to portions of the Tokeland and Moclips/Tahola areas. Crews are responding to scattered outages across the county as well as large outages.  Power has been restored to all customers in Central Park as well.

Currently crews are responding to outages in the following locations:

There continues to be approximately 500 customers without power in the Moclips/Taholah area. 

There are still scattered outages in the county including Newskah Road, locations in Montesano, and the Elma airport.



There are currently two Active Alerts

ALERT 1 – High Surf Advisory

A HIGH SURF ADVISORY IS IN EFFECT UNTIL 5:00AM PDT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 03

Event Start: In Progress

Event End: Sunday, November 03, 2013 4:00 AM PST

Details

ALERT 2 – High Wind Warning

A HIGH WIND WARNING IS IN EFFECT UNTIL 9:00PM PDT SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 02

Event Start: In Progress

Event End: Saturday, November 02, 2013 8:00 PM PDT

Details

Washington

Another April Razor Clam Dig Weekend Proposed


Copalis Beach lies south of the Copalis River and includes Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis. Mocrocks Beach is north of the Copalis River and includes Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

The dig is timed to coincide with morning low tides. No digging will be allowed after noon.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day, and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

Diggers need a valid 2012-13 fishing license to participate in the upcoming opening, since all 2011-12 licenses expired March 31. The exception is young people under age 15, who may fish for free.

Licensing options range from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, which can be purchased on WDFW’s website (https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov ) and from license vendors around the state. 

Moclips Depot Rebuilding Project – Grant Update

Eighteen grants have been submitted from our state and will be ranked.  Then the grants will be forwarded to Washington D.C. for final determination.  Normally several different grants are awarded.  It is now out of our hands as we wait for the granting entity to review our project; and, hopefully approve the grant.

We thank everyone who has supported this project from its inception.  We especially thank those who wrote pledge letters of support.  Without you we would not have reached out goal.

We also cannot go without thanking the “Hidden Coast Scenic Byway (SR 109)” team for their belief in our project and invaluable expertise.  Without Curt Warber with Parametrix, Vicki Cummings with Grays Harbor Council of Governments, and Carrie Sunstrom with the WA DOT we would not have come this far.  They first alerted us to the call for grants and then helped us every step of the way to be sure that we had the necessary requirements for application in place.