Razor Clam dig approved November 4th through November 11th

Clam diggers can return to coastal beaches starting Tuesday, Nov. 4, to dig razor clams during the first of two planned openings in November.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the latest round of evening digs after marine toxin test results showed the clams are safe to eat. Digging is not allowed on any beach before noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said the best digging typically occurs one to two hours before low tide.

“With daylight saving time ending Sunday, diggers will have even less daylight to dig by and should bring lanterns or headlamps,” Ayres said.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Digging days and evening low tides during the upcoming opening are:

  • Nov. 4, Tuesday; 4:26 p.m., -0.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 5, Wednesday; 5:14 p.m., -0.7 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 6, Thursday; 5:59 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 7, Friday; 6:42 p.m., -1.2 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 8, Saturday; 7:24 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • Nov. 9, Sunday; 8:05 p.m., -0.7 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 10, Monday; 8:47 p.m., -0.3 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 11, Tuesday; 9:31 p.m., 0.2 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors

 

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state. A WDFW video, which demonstrates how to teach your kids to harvest razor clams, is available at http://youtu.be/gl9p_PparVk.

Ayres suggested that diggers also should check the forecast before heading out to the beaches.

 

“Clamming has been good when the weather hasn’t chased diggers away,” he said.

 

WDFW also has proposed another dig in November, tentatively set to begin Nov. 20 if marine toxin tests are favorable. That dig is tentatively scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

 

  • Nov. 20, Thursday; 5:06 p.m., 0.0 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 21, Friday; 5:45 p.m., -0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 22, Saturday; 6:24 p.m., -0.8 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • Nov. 23, Sunday; 7:05 p.m., -1.0 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 24, Monday; 7:47 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 25, Tuesday; 8:32 p.m., -0.9 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 26, Wednesday; 9:19 p.m., -0.5 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors

 

Comprehensive information about razor clams – from updates on tentative digs to how-to advice on digging and cooking – is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

Wind Advisory for Grays Harbor, Warning for Pacific County

Strong winds forecast for Western Washington have prompted two separate alerts from the National Weather Service.

Pacific County and Southwestern Washington:

The National Weather Service in Portland has issued a high wind warning near beaches and headlands…which is in effect from 3 pm this afternoon to 9 am pdt wednesday. this replaces the high wind watch which was previously in effect.

* winds: near beaches and headlands…south winds of 35 to 45 mph with gusts 60 to 70 mph at times. coastal communities…south winds 20 to 30 mph with gusts 45 to 55 mph at times.

* timing: beginning late this afternoon and continuing until just after sunrise wednesday morning.

* locations include: cannon beach…netarts…pacific city… long beach…cape disappointment.

* impacts: the winds will likely cause difficulties for beachgoers and those accessing beach and headland areas…including causing tree damage in headland areas.

precautionary/preparedness actions…

a high wind warning means a hazardous high wind event is expected or occurring. sustained wind speeds of at least 40 mph or gusts of 58 mph or more can lead to property damage.

 

Grays Harbor County and Northwest Washington:

The National Weather Service in Seattle has issued a Wind Advisory in effect from 5pm this afternoon to 8 am Wednesday morning.

South wind 20 to 35 mph with gusts to 45 mph will increase this evening and peak overnight.

Impacts, winds this strong can snap small tree branches, topple small or shallow rooted trees, and cause
local power outages.

A Wind Advisory is issued when sustained winds of 30 to 39 mph and/or gusts of 45 to 57 mph are likely.

Week-long razor clam dig approved for late October

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers have approved a week-long razor clam dig beginning Oct. 22 on evening tides at various beaches.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the seven-day dig after marine toxin test results showed the clams on those beaches are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed before noon on those days.

Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager, reminds diggers they’re required to keep the first 15 clams they dig under state law. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

“Most diggers were able to harvest their 15-clam daily limit fairly easily during the season opener earlier this month, except for one evening when some rough weather blew in,” Ayres said. “Some diggers noticed smaller clams at a few beaches, but those clams are growing quickly.”

Digging days and evening low tides during the upcoming opening are:

  • Oct. 22, Wednesday; 6:31 p.m., 0.3 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Oct. 23, Thursday; 7:07 p.m., -0.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Oct. 24, Friday; 7:44 p.m., -0.4 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 25, Saturday; 8:22 p.m., -0.6 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • Oct. 26, Sunday; 9:03 p.m., -0.6 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 27, Monday; 9:47 p.m., -0.4 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Oct. 28, Tuesday; 10:36 p.m., -0.2 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors

The best results typically occur one to two hours before low tide, Ayres said.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Looking ahead to next month, WDFW will announce the final word on a tentative dig to begin Nov. 4 after marine toxin tests have been completed. That dig is tentatively scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • Nov. 4, Tuesday; 4:26 p.m., -0.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 5, Wednesday; 5:14 p.m., -0.7 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 6, Thursday; 5:59 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 7, Friday; 6:42 p.m., -1.2 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 8, Saturday; 7:24 p.m., -1.1 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • Nov. 9, Sunday; 8:05 p.m., -0.7 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 10, Monday; 8:47 p.m., -0.3 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 11, Tuesday; 9:31 p.m., 0.2 feet, Long Beach, Twin Harbors

Comprehensive information about razor clams – from updates on tentative digs to how-to advice on digging and cooking – is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/ .

Two Aberdeen teens injured in car wreck on Long Beach Peninsula

Two teens were injured overnight on the Long Beach Peninsula, after swerving to avoid a deer and colliding with a telephone pole just after 2 this morning. The Washington State Patrol reports the 17 year old driver, and a 15 year old female passenger, both from Aberdeen, were transported to Ocean Beach Hospital with undisclosed injuries. A 47 year old Aberdeen man was also in the 1992 Pontiac Firebird but was not injured. The driver was cited for driving over the center line, without a license, or insurance. Trooper D. Knox also reported that the road was closed for about an hour during the investigation.

U.S. Coast Guard advises strong caution to beachgoers in the Pacific Northwest

Due to the recent number of fatalities the Coast Guard strongly cautions beachgoers to be aware of possible dangers to stay safe while enjoying the Oregon and Washington coasts.

During the past two months, the Coast Guard has responded to numerous reports of beachgoers swept out into the ocean along the Pacific Northwest coast. Since July 3, four of these cases have resulted in fatalities. These include a 10-year-old girl in Long Beach, Washington, July 3, a 53-year-old man in Seaside, Oregon, July 22, an 18-year-old man in Ocean Shores, Washington, July 26 and a 19-year-old man in Garibaldi, Oregon, Monday.

“In each instance, the people who got caught in the currents were visiting from out-of-town,” said Cmdr. Bill Gibbons, chief of response, Coast Guard Sector Columbia River. “Visitors are more likely to enter the water unaware of the unpredictable and extreme dangers posed by beach surf along the Pacific Northwest coast. In one instance, a victim was only in water up to his knees when he was knocked down by a wave and pulled out into the ocean.”

Beachgoers are reminded to always be aware of their surroundings. Water depths can change rapidly along the coastline and waves and rip currents can be very strong and unpredictable.

“The only way to avoid the risk is to avoid going in the water,” said Gibbons.  “At a minimum, people should never enter the water alone, children should never be allowed near the water unattended, and people who are near the edge of the surf line must be prepared for what many refer to as “sneaker waves” – disproportionately large and powerful coastal waves that can appear without warning.”

Additionally, since ocean temperatures in the Pacific Northwest remain around 55 degrees Fahrenheit during the summer months, wet or dry suits are advisable during prolonged water exposure.

“Tragic experiences such as the ones over the last couple of months highlight the need for beachgoers to be fully aware of the dangers while enjoying their time along the coast,” said Capt. Daniel Travers, commander, Coast Guard Sector Columbia River. “Incidents like the aforementioned can be reduced by planning ahead, being aware of your surroundings and observing beach safety guidelines.”

For more information on general beach safety along the Pacific Northwest coast visit http://visittheoregoncoast.com/beach-safety/ and http://www.ripcurrents.noaa.gov.

Happy Fourth of July Holiday – Fireworks restrictions and displays

Police and Emergency Management agencies across Washington are wishing you a happy and safe fourth of July holiday. Local fireworks ordinances vary, and for a complete list visit the Washington State Patrol’s website.

In Aberdeen and Cosmopolis, you can light fireworks from 9am to midnight on the 4th of July only. The same time in Hoquiam on July 3rd and 4th only.

In Ocean Shores fireworks can be lit from noon to 11 today and tomorrow (2nd and 3rd) then until midnight on the 4th.
In Westport you can only light them along Half Moon Bay from 9am to 11 on the 4th.
Grayland has no restrictions

Chuck Wallace with the Grays Harbor County Emergency Management Agency reminds beachgoers of the added dangers there.
Keep all beach fires 100 feet from the dunes, light fireworks closer to the water, and keep an eye on kids in the surf, riptides can pull someone out to sea from no more than knee deep.

If you are pulled in, don’t swim against it, swim parallel to the beach until you escape the outgoing current, or calmly tread water until the current dissipates and you can swim to shore.

Sponsored Fourth of July Events locally include Rich Hartman Five Star Dealership’s Splash Festival at Morrison Riverfront park in Aberdeen, Spectacular Fireworks Extravaganza at the Grays Harbor Raceway in Elma, Booming Bay Fireworks Display at the Marina in Westport, Quinault Beach Resort and Casino in Ocean Shores, and Shoalwater Bay Casino in Tokeland, also Fireworks at the Port in Illwaco, and Fireworks on the Beach in Long Beach.

Final razor clam digs of the season to start May 27

Clam diggers will have one last chance to dig razor clams this season during a final opening set to begin May 27.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed at any beach after noon.

“These last digs will wrap up an excellent razor clam season during which diggers have been getting their limits with lots of big clams,” said Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager. “These dates will mark the end of the most productive razor clam season in more than 30 years.”

WDFW routinely closes the razor clam fishery by the end of May to give the clams a chance to spawn. The next season will begin in fall, when the older clams have recovered from spawning and a new generation begins to grow beneath the sand.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • May 27, Tuesday, 6:24 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • May 28, Wednesday, 7:06 a.m., -1.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • May 29, Thursday, 7:45 a.m., -1.4 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • May 30, Friday, 8:23 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • May 31, Saturday, 9:00 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • June 1, Sunday, 9:37 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Diggers may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, unless they possess a designated harvester card.

Brock Hoenes, WDFW wildlife biologist, cautions clam diggers and other beachgoers to avoid disturbing western snowy plovers, which nest on the state’s coastal beaches from April through August. The small white birds are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act as threatened and by the state as endangered.

Hoenes asks diggers to avoid signed upland beach areas at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, which are closed to protect the nesting birds. At Long Beach, the closed area is located north of Oysterville Road from the state park boundary north to Leadbetter Point. At Twin Harbors, the closed area is located just south of Cranberry Beach Road and continues south for approximately 1.5 miles.

Razor clam diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For more information on razor clam digging, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

 

Razor clam digs approved to start May 13, tentative dates listed through June 1

OLYMPIA – Clam diggers hoping for a few late-season razor clam digs on Washington beaches will have plenty of options to consider.
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today approved eight days of digging, beginning May 13. WDFW gave the OK for the series of digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.
The agency also announced a list of proposed digs, which would run May 27 through June 1. Final approval of these digs will depend on marine toxin tests that will be conducted closer to the start date, said Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager. The agency will announce final approval based on the results of the tests.
Ayres noted that the next series of digs includes dates at Copalis and Mocrocks beaches, which are co-managed with the Quinault Indian Nation (QIN).
WDFW was able to add days at Copalis because the QIN provided clams from their share to the state share, said Phil Anderson, WDFW director.
“This is a perfect example of how WDFW and QIN work together to co-manage this resource,” Anderson said. “We appreciate QIN’s willingness to share a portion of their harvest quota with us thereby contributing to the success of these final digs and providing an economic boost to businesses in the area.”

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

May 13, Tuesday, 6:21 a.m., -0.6 feet, Twin Harbors
May 14, Wednesday, 7:02 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 15, Thursday, 7:44 a.m., -1.5 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 16, Friday, 8:27 a.m., -1.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis
May 17, Saturday, 9:12 a.m., -1.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 18, Sunday, 9:59 a.m., -1.5 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 19, Monday, 10:50 a.m., -1.1 feet, Twin Harbors
May 20, Tuesday, 11:44 a.m., -0.6 feet, Twin Harbors

Digs that have been proposed but not yet approved are tentatively scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

May 27, Tuesday, 6:24 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 28, Wednesday, 7:06 a.m., -1.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
May 29, Thursday, 7:45 a.m., -1.4 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 30, Friday, 8:23 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
May 31, Saturday, 9:00 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
June 1, Sunday, 9:37 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Diggers may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, unless they possess a designated harvester card.
Clam diggers and other beachgoers should avoid disturbing western snowy plovers, said Brock Hoenes, WDFW wildlife biologist. The small white birds, which nest on the state’s coastal beaches from April through August, are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act as threatened and by the state as endangered.
Hoenes also asks that diggers avoid signed upland beach areas at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, which are closed to protect nesting western snowy plovers. At Long Beach, the closed area is located north of Oysterville Road from the state park boundary north to Leadbetter Point. At Twin Harbors, the closed area is located just south of Cranberry Beach Road and continues south for approximately 1.5 miles.
Razor clam diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.
For updates on upcoming digs, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

 

Morning razor clam digs continue this week at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, more digs possible mid-May

Morning razor clam digs continue on the Long Beach and Twin Harbors beaches through Sunday, with a 3-day dig approved on Mocrocks beach May 2nd through the 4th.

WDFW gave the OK for the series of digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, noted that more razor clam digs could be announced for mid-May.

“We’ll look at harvest levels after these upcoming digs are finished and determine whether we have enough clams to offer more opportunities in May,” he said.

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • Apr. 27, Sunday, 5:53 a.m., -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Apr. 28, Monday, 6:39 a.m., -0.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Apr. 29, Tuesday, 7:22 a.m., -1.1 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Apr. 30, Wednesday, 8:03 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • May 01, Thursday, 8:43 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • May 02, Friday, 9:23 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • May 03, Saturday, 10:04 a.m., -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • May 04, Sunday, 10:47 a.m., 0.1 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Diggers may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, unless they possess a designated harvester card.

Clam diggers and other beachgoers should avoid disturbing western snowy plovers, said Brock Hoenes, WDFW wildlife biologist. The small white birds, which nest on the state’s coastal beaches from April through August, are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act as threatened and by the state as endangered.

Hoenes noted snowy plovers – and their eggs – are extremely vulnerable at this time of year because the birds nest in dry sand.

“We urge clam diggers to be careful when driving on the beach or walking through the dunes,” he said. “Under state law, all vehicles are required to travel along the extreme upper limit of the hard sand. When in doubt, follow the path marked by multiple tire tracks.”

Hoenes also asks that diggers avoid signed upland beach areas at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, which are closed to protect nesting western snowy plovers. At Long Beach, the closed area is located north of Oysterville Road from the state park boundary north to Leadbetter Point. At Twin Harbors, the closed area is located just south of Cranberry Beach Road and continues south for approximately 1.5 miles.

Razor clam diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For updates on upcoming digs, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html

Please visit:http://kbkw.com/local-news/140874for the complete story

WDFW plans additional razor clam digs in late April, early May

Washington’s remarkable razor clam season continues as state shellfish managers plan to add digs in late-April and early May.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced a tentative schedule of new digs in light of updated harvest estimates that show a sufficient number of clams to support the additional openings.

“This has been a great year for razor clams,” said Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager.  “Clams this year have been bigger than average and abundant enough to add another series of digs.”

Final approval on upcoming digs will be announced after marine-toxin test results confirm the clams are safe to eat.

“Digging at Mocrocks has been fabulous lately,” Ayres said, noting that the upcoming series of digs includes three dates at that beach.

The upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

•           Apr. 27, Sunday, 5:53 a.m.,  -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach

•           Apr. 28, Monday, 6:39 a.m., -0.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach

•           Apr. 29, Tuesday,  7:22 a.m., -1.1 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach

•           Apr. 30, Wednesday, 8:03 a.m., -1.2 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach

•           May 01, Thursday, 8:43 a.m., -1.0 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach

•           May 02, Friday, 9:23 a.m., -0.7 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

•           May 03, Saturday, 10:04 a.m., -0.3 feet, Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

•           May 04, Sunday, 10:47 a.m., 0.1 feet,  Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

 

WDFW shellfish managers will analyze harvest data after this series of digs is completed. If enough clams remain for more digs, the best tides are around the weekend of May 17, Ayres said.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. Razor clam diggers are reminded that they may not harvest any part of another person’s daily limit, except for those who possess designated harvester cards.

Diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2014-15 fishing license to harvest razor clams on state beaches. Fishing licenses of various kinds are available on the department’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

 

For updates on upcoming digs, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.