Tag Archive for Long Beach

Long Beach trailer park shooter turns gun on self in front of officers

Long Beach, WA – On April 7th, 2014 at 1150 am, the Pacific County Communications Center received a 911 call advising that a person had been shot in the Safe Haven trailer park located in the 1300 block of Pacific Avenue North in Long Beach. The call further advised that the person had been shot in the arm and leg region. The victim managed to leave the area and stated that several shots were still being fired.
Several officers and deputies responded to the scene. Once at the scene, officers began to look for the suspected shooter. In doing so, officers and deputies started to help evacuate the area as an active shooter was still at large. Officers and deputies located the suspect and he went into a trailer at the park. Dialogue was attempted with the suspected shooter. That proved unsuccessful. Officers and deputies noticed smoke that started to emerge from the trailer and through the roof from the inside.
The suspected shooter emerged from the front door of the trailer a short time later armed with a firearm. The suspect brandished the firearm and began to walk away from the trailer. A short distance later, the suspected shooter killed himself with the firearm. The trailer that the suspect was in became fully involved with flames and quickly was destroyed. Initial reports indicate that the victim and the shooter knew each other and both were believed to reside in the trailer park. The Long Beach Police Department is investigating the situation and the circumstances surrounding the incident.
The Pacific County Fire Investigation Team is investigating the origin of the fire. Several law enforcement and emergency services agencies assisted with the incident.

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WDFW plans additional razor clam digs at Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks

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From: WDFW Outdoor News

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Free CERT training this Spring in Pacific County

PCEMA

South Bend, Washington – The Pacific County Emergency Management Agency (PCEMA) is offering a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) course in Long Beach. Training is scheduled as follows:

 

Friday, April 4, 2013 · 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 5, 2014 · 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 12, 2014 · 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

 

The course will be held at the Lighthouse Oceanfront Resort (12415 Pacific Way, Long Beach). Pre-registration is required and is limited to 20 participants.

 

The CERT program is an all-risk, all-hazard training. This valuable course is designed to help you protect yourself, your family, your neighbors, and your neighborhood in an emergency situation. CERT members receive 20 hours of initial training provided free of charge. The course is taught with classroom instruction for the first two days and practical exercises during the last day. Participants under the age of 18 must have parent/guardian permission to attend.

 

To register or for more information, contact Scott McDougall at (360) 642-9338 or email [email protected].

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Razor clam dig approved, big bivalves await diggers on 4 coastal beaches

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

OLYMPIA – Plenty of fat clams await diggers who turn out for the next razor clam dig, set to run Feb. 26 through March 3 on various ocean beaches.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

As in previous openings, all digs are scheduled on evening tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said razor clams sampled in recent days are noticeably heavier than those tested earlier in the season. “With all the plankton in the water, the clams seem to be “fattening” up earlier than usual,” Ayres said. “Those clams will make for some tasty meals after the next opening.”

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • Feb. 26, Wednesday, 4:15 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Feb. 27, Thursday, 5:04 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • Feb. 28, Friday, 5:49 p.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 1, Saturday, 6:32 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • March 2, Sunday, 7:13 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 3, Monday, 7:53 p.m.; +0.3 feet; Twin Harbors
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Ayres noted that the beaches open for the greatest number of days are those with the most clams still available for harvest.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2013-14 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For updates on upcoming digs, see WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

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Proposed razor clam digs include March shift to morning tides

Westport clam diggers

OLYMPIA – Clam diggers looking forward to the next razor clam dig on Washington beaches now have two more months of possible options to consider.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has released a list of proposed digs in March and April, adding to one previously announced for Feb. 26-28.

None of those digs has yet received final approval, but the list will allow diggers to start planning their next trip to the beach, said Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager.

“We expect to add some digs at Mocrocks and Copalis in April, but we need to measure harvest levels next month before we can do that,” Ayres said. “As usual, we’ll give the final word on all of the scheduled digs once we receive the results of upcoming marine toxin tests.”

Ayres also noted that the seasonal shift from evening tides to morning tides will occur March 30, four days into a proposed six-day dig.

“That’s another reason to announce these tentative digging dates as soon as possible, he said. “The last thing we want to do is take people by surprise.”

Proposed digs are tentatively scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • Feb. 26, Wednesday, 4:15 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Feb. 27, Thursday, 5:04 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • Feb. 28, Friday, 5:49 p.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 1, Saturday, 6:32 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • March 2, Sunday, 7:13 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 3, Monday, 7:53 p.m.; +0.3 feet; Twin Harbors
  • March 26, Wednesday, 3:52 p.m.; 0.3 feet; Twin Harbors
  • March 27, Thursday, 4:48 p.m.; 0.1 feet; Twin Harbors
  • March 28, Friday, 5:38 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 29, Saturday, 6:23 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

Seasonal switch to morning tides

  • March 30, Sunday, 6:53 a.m.; -0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 31, Monday, 7:39 a.m.; -0.5 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 1, Tuesday, 8:22 a.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 2, Wednesday, 9:05 a.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 3, Thursday, 9:49 a.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 14, Monday, 6:46 a.m.; +0.2 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 15, Tuesday, 7:24 a.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 16, Wednesday, 8:03 a.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 17, Thursday, 8:43 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 18, Friday, 9:26 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach,
  • April 19, Saturday, 10:14 a.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 20, Sunday, 11:06 a.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach

Ayres noted that the 2nd Annual Long Beach Razor Clam Festival will be held April 19-20. Informational is available athttp://longbeachrazorclamfestival.com/.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2013-14 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.govand from license vendors around the state.

For updates on upcoming digs, see WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

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Next razor clam dig set to begin January 28

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

OLYMPIA – Clam diggers can return to coastal beaches Tuesday (Jan. 28) through Sunday (Feb. 2) to dig razor clams during the last of three openings this month.

 

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the latest dig after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

As in previous openings, all digs are scheduled on evening tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

 

Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager, said conditions for the upcoming dig should be much better than during the last opening in mid-January.

 

“The surf has calmed down, and we have some excellent low tides this time around,” Ayres said. “Success rates should be much improved during the next opener.”

 

Upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

 

  • Jan. 28, Tuesday, 4:36 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Jan. 29, Wednesday, 5:25 p.m.; -1.2 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • Jan. 30, Thursday, 6:11 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • Jan. 31, Friday, 6:55 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • Feb. 1, Saturday, 7:38 p.m.; -1.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • Feb. 2, Sunday, 8:20 p.m.; -0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

 

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

 

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2013-14 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

 

One additional razor clam dig is tentatively scheduled in late February during a season that is expected to extend into spring. For more information about upcoming digs, see WDFW’s razor clam webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

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Razor clam dig approved to run Wednesday through Saturday this week

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

OLYMPIA – Clam diggers can return to coastal beaches Wednesday (Jan. 15) through Saturday (Jan. 18) to dig razor clams during a month packed with digging opportunities.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the latest dig after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

As in previous openings, all digs are scheduled on evening tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

“The timing of the upcoming dig appears to be shaping up nicely,” said Dan Ayres, WDFW shellfish manager. “After a week of thirty-foot waves, the ocean is settling down with a chance of sun breaks.”

Upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • Jan. 15, Wednesday, 6:19 p.m.; -0.1 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Jan. 16, Thursday, 6:51 p.m.; -0.1 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Jan. 17, Friday, 7:22 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • Jan. 18, Saturday, 7:53 p.m.; 0.2 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2013-14 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For information about additional razor clam digs tentatively scheduled through February, see WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

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