Additional trout releases to focus on lakes in Seven Western Washington counties

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is stocking 47 western Washington lakes with 340,000 catchable-size trout this fall.

This is nearly four times more fish than were released last fall in western Washington.

WDFW is currently stocking lakes in Grays Harbor, Island, King, Pierce, Snohomish, Thurston, and Whatcom Counties.

Those lakes, which are scheduled to be stocked between Oct. 12-19, include:

  • Grays Harbor County: Vance Creek ponds 1 and 2;
  • Island County: Cranberry Lake;
  • King County: Angle, Bitter, Deep, Rattlesnake, Shadow, Green, Langlois, Walker, Holm, Fish, Fivemile and Fenwick lakes;
  • Pierce County: Harts, Kapowsin, Bonney and Bradley lakes;
  • Snohomish County: Tye Lake and Gissburg Pond North and South;
  • Thurston County: Long’s Pond, Offutt, Black, St. Clair, Lawrence, Long and Ohop Lakes; and
  • Whatcom County: Fazon Lake.

Other waters that were recently stocked include Island, Lost, Nahwatzel, and Spencer lakes in Mason County; Kitsap Lake in Kitsap County; Rattlesnake Lake in King County; Cascade Lake in San Juan County; and Gibbs, Leland and Teal lakes in Jefferson County.

Additional stocking efforts will focus on different lakes and counties in western Washington and will continue through October and November.

Bonus bag limits will also be allowed on some lakes, doubling angler’s catch limits from five to 10 trout.

A list of lakes to be stocked, those offering the bonus bag limit, and the department’s recently updated stocking plan is available for viewing at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/fall-into-fishing/.

Chris Donley, inland fish program manager, said he expects angling to be great throughout the fall and winter months at all of these lakes. “Most of the trout are 11 to 13 inches long, with a few larger ones in the mix,” he said.

The fall fish plants are in response to anglers’ requests to increase fall and winter trout fishing opportunities in western Washington, said Donley. That effort also includes stocking lakes in southwest Washington for the Nov. 28 Black Friday opener, which offers anglers the opportunity to skip the shopping malls, get outside and enjoy fishing on the day after Thanksgiving.

For those fishing closer to the Puget Sound area, there are thousands of trout available in lakes that can be pursued throughout fall and winter, said Donley. “We encourage anglers young and old, inexperienced or well-seasoned, to get out and take advantage of these great fisheries,” he added.

For up-to-date stocking information this fall, anglers should follow the department on Twitter or Facebook, accessible from http://wdfw.wa.gov, or see the department’s weekly catchable trout stocking report at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/.

Anglers must have a current Washington freshwater fishing license valid through March 31, 2015, to participate in these events.

Licenses can be purchased online at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov; by telephone at 1-866-246-9453; or at hundreds of license vendors across the state. For details on license vendor locations, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/.

Migratory fish return to Upper Elwha River for the first time in over a century

Thanks to a radiotracking program begun this spring, fisheries biologists confirmed yesterday that two radio tagged bull trout have migrated through Glines Canyon and are now upstream of the former Lake Mills in Rica Canyon.

Two other bull trout have also been detected above Glines Canyon, but were not located during the ground survey yesterday.  Biologists will use fixed-wing aircraft to conduct watershed-wide surveys this fall.

“To witness these first fish to migrate above Glines Canyon is both amazing and inspiring,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum.  “We always knew the fish would return once the dams were removed – but these four fish passed through Glines Canyon even before the concrete was gone.”

Both of the fish currently in Rica Canyon were tagged earlier this summer at locations below the former Elwha dam site.

The radiotracking program is possible through partnerships with the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington’s National Park Fund, allowing biologists to monitor the movements of radio-tagged salmonids in the Elwha River.

Each fish is equipped with a a uniquely coded radio transmitter that differentiates it from all other tagged fish. Radio signals from the tags are then detected by radio receivers and antennas.  Six telemetry stations were installed between the mouth of the river and just above the Glines Canyon dam site. These stations continually scan for and record data, documenting when individual fish pass by each station.  Biologists also manually track fish between Rica Canyon and the river mouth using handheld radio receivers and antennas

Eighty-seven anadromous fish have been radio-tagged so far.  Of that total, 13 bull trout, 2 winter steelhead, 5 Chinook and one sockeye salmon have been located above the old Elwha dam site.

More details on the migratory bull trout located above Glines Canyon yesterday.

  •      **  Fish #167 was captured and radiotagged on May 7 approximately 3.5 miles above the river’s mouth.  Before releasing the fish, biologists recorded its length as 19 inches.  This fish swam through the old Elwha dam site in late July and was detected above Glines Canyon in early August, before the last chunk of the dam was demolished on August 26.
  • ** Fish #200, measuring 20.5 inches, was radio-tagged on June 25 about a mile and a half upstream of the river’s mouth.  This fish swam past the Elwha dam site on July 20 and swam through Glines Canyon on August 24, just before the final blast.
  •      **  Bull trout are among the smallest of Pacific salmonids, and are federally listed as a threatened species.
  •      **  Rica Canyon is upstream of the former Lake Mills and begins about 2.5 miles above Glines Canyon.

Background and more information about the salmonid radiotracking program and Elwha River Restoration can be found at the Olympic National Park website: http://www.nps.gov/olym/naturescience/damremovalblog.htm

Board of Natural Resources acts to reimburse Pacific and Wahkiakum counties for marbled murrelet restrictions

The state Board of Natural Resources yesterday authorized the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to transfer about 66 acres of forestland, managed for the benefit of Pacific and Wahkiakum counties, into conservation status. The parcels were selected because each has timber harvest restrictions related to the endangered marbled murrelet.

 

“Today’s unanimous action by the Board of Natural Resources shows how the State Forest Trust Land Replacement Program is working to support struggling rural timber economies while protecting habitat for the marbled murrelet and other endangered species,” said Peter Goldmark, Commissioner of Public Lands, who chairs the Board of Natural Resources.

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As a result of the board’s action, Pacific County will receive $356,000, based on the timber value of about 17 acres of State Forest Trust land, when the parcel is transferred into the Naselle Highlands Natural Resources Conservation Area (NRCA). The legislatively funded replacement program for state trust lands also will provide about $25,000 for DNR to purchase replacement working forestland better suited for producing revenue that supports county services.

 

In a separate action through the replacement program, Wahkiakum County will receive $320,000, based on the timber value of 49 acres of State Forest Trust land, when it is transferred into the Skamokawa Creek NRCA. DNR will use the parcel’s land value of $73,000 to buy replacement working forestland.

 

Created in 2011 by the legislature, the State Forest Trust Land Replacement Program allows DNR to transfer certain state-owned forestlands that are encumbered by federal endangered species restrictions into conservation status and replace them with other working forestlands. The replacement program targets small, economically stressed rural Washington counties that depend heavily on timber revenue to support public services.

 

Addition to Elk River NRCA
The board today also approved the transfer of 194 acres of state trust land into the Elk River NRCA through the state’s Trust Land Transfer Program. The $1.6 million timber value of the parcel, located near Westport in Grays Harbor County, will be used to support public school construction statewide. Its $349,000 land value will be used to purchase a less environmentally sensitive replacement property for the Common School Trust. The 5,413-acre Elk River NRCA contains the largest and highest quality, intact estuarine system remaining in Washington or Oregon.

 

In other actions, the board authorized DNR to offer $217,000 to purchase a 40-acre property west of Lake Roesiger in Snohomish County from a willing private seller. The acquisition will add to the Roesiger State Forest which DNR manages. The board also authorized DNR to purchase a 130-acre parcel of Douglas-fir and red alder abutting a large block of state trust forest in Pacific County for $495,000. Both properties will be managed for long-term revenue for the Common School Trust.

FBI seeks information on bank robber nicknamed the ‘Quick-Change Bandit’

The Seattle Safe Streets Task Force is seeking information about a bank robber nicknamed the “Quick-Change Bandit.”

The unidentified bank robber is believed to have robbed at least two different banks within an hour on Monday, August 18 and changed his clothes between the two robberies. This quick clothing change led to his nickname. Investigators believe he may have also robbed a bank on Saturday, August 16.

The subject may be a black male in his late 20s or early 30s, around 6’0” tall, and of stocky build. He threatened tellers during the robberies.

 

 

 

 

 

The subject is wanted for his alleged involvement in at least three bank robberies:

  • Saturday, August 16, 2014, approximately 12:30 p.m.—Chase Bank, on Gravelly Lake Drive SW, Lakewood, Washington
  • Monday, August 18, 2014, approximately 11:40 a.m.—Bank of America, on 104th Avenue SE, Kent, Washington
  • Monday, August 18, 2014, approximately 12:30 p.m.—Chase Bank on A Street SE, Auburn, Washington

Anyone with information as to the identity or whereabouts of the suspected robber should refrain from approaching him and is urged to contact law enforcement immediately.

Anyone with information that can help identify this individual is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). Callers to Crime Stoppers may remain anonymous and are eligible to receive a cash reward of up to $1,000 if the information given leads to an arrest and charge of the person(s) involved.

The Seattle Safe Streets Task Force (SSSTF) includes members from the FBI, Bellevue Police Department, Auburn Police Department, King County Sheriff’s Office, and Seattle Police Department. The SSSTF is working with the Kent and Lakewood Police Departments to identify and apprehend this robber.

Washington’s Clean Boating Program wins $1.5 Million federal grant for waste pumpouts

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced a $1.5 million grant to the Washington State Parks Department’s Clean Vessel Act (CVA) Program, which works in partnership with Washington Sea Grant to help marinas install and operate septic pumpout stations, educate marina owners and boaters about the importance of clean water and proper onboard sewage disposal, and distribute free adapter kits that make pumping easier and cleaner. The grant is one in a $16.1 million package awarded competitively to 21 states’ CVA programs. Washington, which has one of most active and innovative CVA programs, received the fifth-highest award.

“Clean water is a fundamental need for both people and wildlife, and a perfect example of how the fates of both are intertwined,” USFWS Director Dan Ashe said in announcing the grants. “Clean Vessel Act grants not only help ensure that clean drinking water, sustainable ecosystems and healthy recreational areas are accessible to the American people, they also provide a substantial economic benefit for local communities.”

This year those benefits will be especially directed to the San Juan Islands, which have rich marine habitats, heavy boating activity, and limited pumpout facilities, as well as South Puget Sound, Hood Canal and Lake Washington, longtime boating and water-quality hotspots. Washington State Parks is currently seeking sources for the 25 percent match required under the grants to fund a second pumpout boat on Lake Washington and a free pumpout service in the San Juans.

Clean Vessel Act funds come from manufacturer excise taxes on fishing tackle, import duties on recreational boats and fishing gear, and motorboat and small engine fuel taxes. Last year, Washington’s Clean Vessel Program diverted more than 5.6 million gallons of raw sewage that would otherwise have contaminated state waters, threatening fish, shellfish, and human health.

Washington Sea Grant and its partners, including the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and U.S Power Squadron, have delivered hands-free pumpout adapters to more than 7,000 boaters. Sea Grant has also created a Google map showing all 146 CVA pumpout locations in Washington, available at www.pumpoutwashington.org.

Boaters, yacht clubs and other organizations that would like free pumpout adapters should contact Aaron Barnett at (206) 616-8929 or aaronb5@uw.edu.

Olympic National Forest asks “Which roads are important to you?”

The Olympic National Forest is hosting open houses asking the public to share the areas and roads they use on the Forest.  This information will help the Forest identify a financially sustainable road system that meets diverse access needs, minimizes environmental harm, and is safe and dependable because it is scaled to available resources.

 

“Your participation will help us understand your access needs,” said Forest Supervisor Reta Laford.  “It would be particularly helpful to know what areas you use on the Forest and what roads you use to get there.”

 

The open houses will be held around the Olympic Peninsula during the summer of 2014.

 

DATE TIME LOCATION
July 30 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Quinault  – Olympic National Forest, Quinault Ranger Station • 353 South Shore Rd.
August 19 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Shelton  – Shelton Civic Center • 525 West Cota St.
August 21 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Aberdeen – Rotary Log Pavilion •1401 Sargent Blvd.
August 27 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Olympia  – Olympic National Forest, Supervisor’s Office •1835 Black Lake Blvd. SW

 

In addition to attending open houses, the public may provide comments using the web-based map or on-line questionnaire on the Forest website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/olympic/sustainableroads.  Questionnaires are also available at any Olympic National Forest office.  Comments will be taken until August 31, 2014.

 

Forest road.

Approximately 2,000 miles of roads on the Olympic National Forest provide access for resource management, recreation, and a variety of other uses. About 1,200 miles are open to motorized vehicles and 600 miles are closed, that may be opened intermittently for resource management.

As part of a National effort, we are conducting a road system analysis to identify the minimum road system needed “for travel and for administration, utilization, and protection of National Forest System lands” [36 CFR 212.5(b)Forest Service Manual 7710Forest Service Handbook 7709.55(20)].

By the Fall of 2015, we will integrate agency and public input to produce a travel analysis report that will provide the basis for developing future proposed actions for travel management.

Your participation will help us understand your access needs! Learn how to help.

Mason County search crews find missing 10-year old safe Friday morning

Search-and-rescue crews have located the 10-year old boy missing in Mason County overnight, spotted by helicopter around 9:30, he was reported safe shortly after.
Searchers from Grays Harbor, Thurston, Pierce and Mason counties searched for the boy after he disappeared while picking berries with his sister near Lake Cushman in Mason County. The family searched for him until dark and then called for help. Ground searchers found a footprint earlier that morning.

Over 30 Search and Rescue ground volunteers as well as 4 K-9 teams from Mason County, Pierce County and Thurston County were called and responded to the area. Searchers worked throughout Thursday night. King County Sheriff’s Office helicopter “Guardian One” responded and attempted to check the area, but was forced to discontinue due to heavy cloud cover.

Hernandez recovery missionFriday morning, July 25, 2014, 30 more Search & Rescue volunteers as well as 4 more K-9 teams were called to replace the workers from the night. “Guardian One” also returned and began searching.

Mason County Sheriff’s Office Detectives were called in and began checking out abandoned cabins, questioning local area residents, and contacting registered sex offenders living in and around the area.

Around 10:00 AM, “Guardian One” spotted a boy in the thick woods on a small mountain above where Search & Rescue teams were searching. “Guardian One” directed a K-9 team to the boy’s location and confirmed that the boy was, in fact, the lost boy Nathan.

Nathan was provided food and drink, checked out by Fire District #18 Medics, and then was returned to his family safe and sound.

The family was vacationing from Uvalde, Texas and wanted to express their sincere gratitude and appreciation for all of the Deputies, Troopers, Fire Fighters, Dispatchers and Search & Rescue volunteers who worked to find Nathan and return him back to his family.

Hernandez recovery mission

 

State Update: Fires hold steady as victims get help

The state’s lead fire fighting agencies—the Department of Natural Resources (DNR)andthe State Fire Marshal’s Office of the Washington State Patrol (WSP)—continued to lead state government’s response today to multiple wildfires  in central and eastern Washington today.

 

Okanogan County: Fires were cooler this morning on the Carlton Complex, but were bad yesterday as 41 homes were destroyed near Alta Lake. County emergency management estimates a total of 150-200 homes have now been destroyed in Okanogan County. The Carlton Complex has burned 299,897 acres. Brewster, Pateros, Twisp, Winthrop and other communities in the county are temporarily powering water systems and sewer services on generator. Two of the four gas stations in Winthrop have power now, making it less of a problem to gasoline and diesel fuel.

 

While Okanogan County has been the hardest hit due to the sprawling Carlton Complex, wildfires are also burning in Chelan, Grant, Kittitas, Lincoln, Spokane and Yakima counties.

  • The Chiwaukum Complex has burned 11,051 acres and continues to grow.

o   The Mills Canyon Fire, branch of the Chiwaukum, has burned 22,571 acres

  • The Saddle Mountain Fire in Kittitas County has burned 20,200 acres but will demobilize at midnight.
  • The Watermelon Hill Fire in Spokane County has burned 8,000 acres.

 

Other state activities

 

The Washington State Department of Transportation is working to keep roads open. The latest on road closures and openings is at http://www.wsdot.com/traffic/trafficalerts/default.aspx.

The Department of Commerce’s Energy Office says approximately 7,000 customers of the Okanogan PUD and Okanogan Electric Cooperative are without power. Power for feeders along Interstate and state highways and from there into Pateros and Winthrop is estimated to be restored by the end of week. It is estimated that full restoration along county roads and to individual homes and businesses in Okanogan will take several weeks.

 

The Washington National Guard has four Blackhawk helicopters, two fuel trucks and 21 personnel deployed to Carlton Complex. There are two Chinook helicopters, two fuel trucks and 17 personnel on the Mills Canyon Complex. An incident communications package staffed by five personnel is setting up at Omak. Having completed pre-mobilization preparations, 100 National Guard soldiers are standing by in Yakima to support Department of Natural Resources fire fighters. Through July 19, Guard helicopters dropped 400,440 gallons of water on fires.

 

Personnel from the Department of Health’s (DOH) Environment Public Health Division are consulting with wildfire-impacted counties about air quality and water quality issues. DOH and the Department of Ecology are partnering to analyze and monitor how smoke and ash are affecting air quality.

 

The Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) deployed two trained crews with a total of 20 youths to support DNR firefighting efforts.DSHS and the American Red Cross are co-leading state-level mass care and emergency assistance efforts with support from FEMA Region 10.

 

The Department of Enterprise Services is assisting Okanogan County with a liaison to manage donations, and another liaison to support operations in the county’s emergency operations center in Omak.

 

Gov. Jay Inslee and Maj. Gen, Bret Daugherty from the Washington Military Department toured the Paschal-Sherman Indian Boarding School, a Bureau of Indian Affairs facility on the Colville Indian Reservation. The school is being considered for housing displaced individuals from the Carlton Complex fire, or National Guard and emergency services personnel supporting fire-fighting efforts.

                                                                                                                    

Non-government agencies—The American Red Cross is operating shelters in Chelan, Omak and Winthrop and opening a shelter in Brewster tonight. The Red Cross and Southern Baptist Disaster Services began providing meals in Okanogan County today. The Red Cross is establishing a shelter in Brewster so residents from there will be closer to home. Many Brewster residents are currently using the shelter in the town of Chelan. The Chelan shelter will not close until people are no longer staying there. In coordination with the Red Cross, Okanogan County Health is contacting medical suppliers to ensure that Winthrop residents are able to get replacement oxygen bottles.

 

State agencies coordinate their support to the wildfire response through the State Emergency Operations Center (EOC) at Camp Murray. The Logistics Section of the State EOC is processing requests for generators from Pateros, Twisp and Winthrop. The three communities are already using back-up generators to power utility services and need more. A liaison from the State EOC’s Operations Section worked with utility officials in Okanogan County today as they assessed power requirements in Twisp and Winthrop.

Boating Program urges boaters to be safe this Fourth of July weekend

Thousands of boaters will hit the water this July 4th holiday to enjoy the weather and to get the best views of waterfront fireworks shows. Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission’s Boating Program urges boaters to stay safe and pack extra patience.

“For some boaters, the July 4th celebration is one of the few times they take their boat out this summer,” said Sgt. Ryan Boyle with the Bonney Lake Police Department. “With thousands of boaters on the waterways, patience will run thin, mistakes will happen and a fun-filled day can turn tragic when alcohol is involved.”

In Washington, a boater is considered “boating under the influence” (BUI) with a blood alcohol level of .08 percent or higher. A boater can be arrested for operating a boat under the influence. According to State Parks Boating Program, 20 percent of Washington boating fatalities involved alcohol or other intoxicants.

“We want everyone to have fun while celebrating this Independence Day with their families and friends,” Boyle added. “People just need to remember that being on the water all day can exacerbate alcohol’s effects, so think about holding off until after you’ve safely made it home. It’s important that boaters don’t endanger boaters and others on the water.”

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission administers the state’s Boating Program, which provides leadership in boating safety and environmental education and outreach. The goal of the program is to reduce accidents and fatalities, increase stewardship of Washington waterways, and keep recreational boating a safe, accessible and enjoyable pastime. The program works with law enforcement agencies across Washington to promote boating safety education and to monitor on-the-water activities.

For more information on the Boating Program and regulations, visit www.parks.wa.gov/boating

About Washington State Parks
The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission manages more than 100 state parks and properties totaling approximately 120,000 acres. The Commission provides a variety of recreation opportunities for citizens and provides stewardship protection for a diverse array of natural, cultural and historic resources. State Parks’ statewide programs include long-distance trails, boating safety and winter recreation.

Follow Washington State Parks:

Share your favorite state park adventure on the State Parks’ blog site atwww.AdventureAwaits.com.

Support state parks by purchasing your annual Discover Pass today, and enjoy a whole year of outdoor fun on Washington’s beautiful state-managed recreation lands. For more information, visitwww.discoverpass.wa.gov.

Board of Natural Resources approves land purchase on Olympic Peninsula for Common School Trust

OLYMPIA – The Board of Natural Resources today authorized the purchase of an 80-acre parcel of forestland on the Olympic Peninsula. The parcel, which is zoned as commercial forest, will be purchased from a private seller for $250,000. The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will manage the acreage for plant and wildlife habitat and as a working forest to produce long-term revenue for the Common School Trust, which supports public school construction statewide.

 

Known as the West Siebert Creek parcel, the new acquisition is adjacent to a larger block of state trust land that also is managed by DNR. Funds for the purchase will come from previous sales of other state trust lands that no longer met DNR’s revenue and habitat management goals.

 

Sustainable harvest calculation discussed

Also at today’s meeting, Board members discussed the Western Washington Sustainable Harvest Calculation, which determines the level of future timber harvests on more than one million acres of state trust lands west of the Cascade Mountains. Board members expressed their desire for public input and thorough environmental review of the calculation. The Sustainable Harvest Calculation is designed to ensure sustainable revenue is produced from trust lands while sustaining healthy forest ecosystems and habitat for threatened and endangered species.

 

Board of Geographic Names
During today’s meeting, the Board briefly adjourned to meet as the state Board on Geographic Names, a function assigned to it by the state legislature, to consider proposals from the public. The new official geographic names and locations are:

 

Meyer Creek in Pierce County (Township: 21N, Range 1E, Section 2): This previously unnamed 0.5-mile-long stream flows into Lay Inlet at the town of Rosedale, 2.5 miles west of the City of Gig Harbor.  The name commemorates R. B. Meyer, who purchased a 49-acre parcel in 1928 to establish a dairy farm.

 

Golden Point in San Juan County (Township: 34N, Range 3E, Section 11): This previously unnamed 8-acre cape is located along the southern coast of San Juan Island, just inside the boundary of San Juan Island National Park, and on the east side of Eagle Cove. The name is intended to describe how the point looks at sunset.

 

Lee Island in San Juan County (Township: 34N, Range 3W, Section 4): A previously unnamed island located at the mouth of False Bay, San Juan Island. The name commemorates Emelia “Lee” Bave, an active community member who owned the property across from this island from the early 1950s until her death in 2008 at age 97.

 

Dickenson Cove in Thurston County (Township: 19N, Range 1W, Section 6): A previously unnamed cove, east of Dickenson Point, three miles northeast of the community of Boston Harbor. The name commemorates Thomas Dickenson who was a carpenter’s mate on an 1841 United State exploration expedition to the area.

 

Greenfield Creek in Thurston County (Township: 19N, Range 1W): A previously unnamed three-quarter-mile-long stream that flows into Puget Sound, northeast of the community of Boston Harbor. The name refers to location of the creek’s headwaters at a home site known informally as Greenfield Farm.

 

Longs Pond in Thurston County Township: (18N, Range 1W, Sections 15 & 22): A previously unnamed lake of approximately 11 acres in Woodland Creek Community Park in the city of Lacey. The name designation, which was requested by the City of Lacey Parks and Recreation Department, fulfills a verbal commitment the city made to honor the family of the property’s previous owner, Gil Long.

 

Washington State Board on Geographic Names
The State Board on Geographic Names is authorized by state law to establish the official names for lakes, mountains, streams, places, towns, and other geographic features of Washington State. Names approved by the Board are published in the Washington Administrative Code and forwarded to the United States Board on Geographic Names for federal consideration.