State disciplines health care providers

OLYMPIA — The Washington State Department of Health has taken disciplinary actions or withdrawn charges against health care providers in our state.

The department’s Health Systems Quality

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State revokes, suspends licenses, certifications, registrations of health care providers

OLYMPIA ¾ The Washington State Department of Health has revoked

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Local projects among 70 statewide, proposed $202 million in loans/grants to protect Washington waters

The Washington Department of Ecology proposes to spend $202 million in dedicated grants and loans to help pay for 70 local projects across the state to protect the health of Washington waters. Included is a low interest loan for a new waste water collection system in the Oyehut/Illahee area that will eliminate 130 existing on-site sewage systems, as well as a loan to replace the outfall diffuser at the City of Aberdeen’s waste water treatment plant. There is also a proposed loan to complete the Shelton Basin 3 Sewer Rehabilitation Construction Project.The funding is contingent on a final state supplemental budget and final federal appropriations. It becomes available at the start of the state’s next fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014.   State financial managers calculate that 11 jobs in Washington are created for every $1 million spent for construction and design funding. That would make this proposed round of funding support more than 2,200 jobs. Over half of these are likely to be local construction jobs.   The funding will be directed to water protection on agricultural lands; upgrades and expansions of sewer plants and collection systems; septic system improvements; water protection and cleanup projects; efforts to manage stormwater; streamside restoration projects; and more.   Here are highlights of the proposed funding:   Port Angeles, Spokane, and King County are proposed to receive $62 million in Revolving Fund loans to correct combined sewer overflows (CSOs). CSOs are discharges of untreated sewage that overflow directly to nearby streams, lakes, and harbors when wastewater collection systems are overloaded by large stormwater flows.   Ecology proposes $1.1 million in grants for projects on both sides of the Cascades to protect clean water on agricultural lands. Of this funding:

The Palouse Rock Lake Conservation District proposes to enhance streamside areas of the

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Variety of weather hazards likely to affect western Washington through Saturday night

SYNOPSIS:

Two strong and fast moving frontal systems will move across Western Washington tonight and early Saturday morning

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Harbor Manor in Hoquiam among statewide housing purchase

TUKWILLA, Wash. - When a portfolio of nine privately owned Section 8-assisted housing complexes located in five counties scattered across Washington state was offered for sale last spring, the King County Housing Authority spearheaded a collaborative effort to purchase it. The housing authorities of Bremerton, Grays Harbor County, Yakima, and Chelan County and the City of Wenatchee participated in assuring the preservation of a total of 337 homes within the various communities.

“If they lost their housing because it got too expensive, they couldn’t take a second job to pencil it out. Now they can sleep at night in a safe, stable place to live, which is what anybody would want for their mom or dad, grandma or grandpa.”

The unusual collective strategy – which represents the most wide-ranging state initiative to date to preserve existing subsidized housing – was necessary because the seller wanted to dispose of the portfolio as a single sale. Failure to acquire even one of the nine properties would have resulted in failure to preserve any of the properties. The current owner, who was also the initial developer and long-term owner of the properties, worked with the housing authority to try to assure long-term preservation of these apartments as affordable housing.

“Preserving existing subsidized housing is the most cost-effective way to maintain the supply of affordable rental apartments,” said Stephen Norman, executive director of the King County Housing Authority. “Working with the state Department of Commerce, King County government and housing authorities across the state, we have been able to protect 337 low-income households, the vast majority of them senior citizens, from being forced from their homes – and at the same time, have preserved for the long-term, crucial local housing resources.”

WDFW to stock western Washington lakes with large rainbow trout this fall

OLYMPIA, Wash. - As part of its new "Fall into Fishing" promotion, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) fish hatchery crews began stocking 33 Western Washington lakes with 75,000 large rainbow trout in October.

Fall into Fishing stocking efforts will continue into November leading up to WDFW's second-annual "Black Friday" fishing event on the day after Thanksgiving.

"We're launching Fall into Fishing in response to requests from anglers to increase year-round trout fishing opportunities in western Washington," said Chris Donley, inland lakes program manager.

Three lakes in King County - Morton, Green, and Meridian - have been stocked, as well as Silver Lake in Snohomish County.

"Meridian, Green, Morton, and Silver lakes should provide excellent fishing opportunities this weekend and throughout October," said Donley. "But this is just the beginning.  All fall, anglers can expect 12 to 17-inch trout as well as some 5 to 6 pounders at many Puget Sound and southwest Washington lakes."

State disciplines health care providers

OLYMPIA, Wash. - The Washington State Department of Health has taken disciplinary actions or withdrawn charges against health care providers in our state.

The department’s Health Systems Quality Assurance Division works with boards, commissions, and advisory committees to set licensing standards for more than 80 health care professions (e.g., medical doctors, nurses, counselors).

Information about health care providers is on the agency website. Click on “Look up a healthcare provider license” in the “How Do I?” section of the Department of Health website (doh.wa.gov). The site includes information about a health care provider’s license status, the expiration and renewal date of their credential, disciplinary actions and copies of legal documents issued after July 1998. This information is also available by calling 360-236-4700. Consumers who think a health care provider acted unprofessionally are encouraged to call and report their complaint.

Elk Foundation Grants Fund Research and Habitat Work in State

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Enhancing over 10,000 acres of habitat and using GPS collars to research the Snoqualmie Valley elk herd top a list of Washington conservation projects slated to receive 2012 grants from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

The RMEF funding commitment totals $189,960 and affects 11 counties: Asotin, Columbia, Garfield, Grays Harbor, King, Lewis, Okanogan, Pend Oreille, San Juan, Stevens and Yakima.

Two projects have statewide interest. One has implications across the northwestern U.S.

The research in Snoqualmie Valley will identify elk herd composition, habitat use and movement patterns, and the data will be used to identify highway crossings and improve management plans, we’re proud to work with the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Dept. of Transportation and other partners on this important project. - David Allen, RMEF president and CEO


Allen added that prescribed burning, weed treatment and forest thinning projects will be used to enhance habitat in many areas of the state.

RMEF’s mission is to ensure the future of elk, other wildlife and their habitat. Since 1985, the organization and its partners have completed 484 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Washington with a combined value of more than $106 million.

Funding for RMEF grants is based on local membership drives and banquet fundraising by RMEF chapters and volunteers in Washington. Allen thanked RMEF supporters for their dedication to conservation both in Washington and all across elk country.

Anglers Enjoy Big Trout, Nice Weather on Opening Day of Lowland Lakes Season

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Good weather and big trout helped to boost catch rates on opening day of this year’s lowland lakes fishing season.

Based on creel checks conducted at 112 lakes around the state, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) estimates that anglers caught an average of 3.99 trout on opening day Saturday, April 28.

The weather was good and so was the fishing, we saw a lot of limits taken at lakes around the state. - Chris Donley, WDFW’s Inland Fish manager

For most lakes, the daily limit is five fish. Donley said the 5,129 anglers contacted by WDFW on opening day retained an average of 2.6 trout - up from 2.3 fish in recent years. The rest were released.

One reason for the higher retention rate may be that three million of the "catchable-size" trout WDFW planted before the opener averaged 11-13 inches, about a third larger than before. Many lakes were also stocked with thousands of triploids, broodstock and other large trout weighing up to 11 pounds apiece.

Lots of folks noticed those larger fish, with bigger fish and cool but sunny weather, it was all in all a good opener. - Mark Downen, a WDFW fish biologist for Mason and Kitsap counties