Tag Archive for Joint Base Lewis

Deserter sentenced at Lewis-McChord to 1 year

JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash. (AP) — A 28-year-old Sacramento man who deserted the Army 10 years ago was sentenced at Joint Base Lewis-McChord to a year in jail…. …read more

From: AP Washington News

Share on Tumblr

Ex-Lewis-McChord soldier pleads to sexting charges

TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — A soldier pleaded guilty Monday in West Virginia to charges he solicited and received sexually explicit images of a West Virginia teenager while stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord…. …read more

From: AP Washington News

    

Share on Tumblr

Van carrying 11 military crashes, 1 fatality

LAKEWOOD, Wash. (AP) — The Washington State Patrol says one man died and another was injured when a van carrying 11 active duty members of the military from Joint Base Lewis McChord crashed on Interstate 5 in the Tacoma suburb of Lakewood…. …read more

From: AP Washington News

    

Share on Tumblr

New sensors for JBLM for low-flying helicopters

JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash. (AP) — The Army plans a $4.6 million system at Joint Base Lewis-McChord to help monitor helicopters that fly below 500 feet – under the radar…. …read more

From: AP Washington News

    

Share on Tumblr

Suicides drop at Lewis-McChord

TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Suicides recorded at Joint Base Lewis-McChord saw a small drop in 2013, the first decline in self-inflicted deaths since 2007…. …read more

From: AP Washington News

    

Share on Tumblr

Puget Sound waters to run red near Joint Base Lewis McChord

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Red dye will be injected into treated wastewater this week at Joint Base Lewis McChord’s wastewater plant then monitored in a state health department study. The Department of Health, along with federal, tribal, state and local agencies, are doing the study in the Puget Sound waters off Solo Point in Pierce County to see where shellfish are safe to harvest.

The test will be on Monday and Tuesday. Red dye will likely be visible in the waters near the treatment plant. Tracking will include gauging the wastewater’s movement and dilution. The dye isn’t harmful to people, marine life, or the environment.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency is funding this test as part of a larger study, which includes other pollution surveys and ongoing marine water quality monitoring. Results will help determine whether closed shellfish beaches in some areas of Pierce County could be reopened to harvest.

The Department of Health is responsible for the safety of commercial shellfish harvested in the state. The agency’s Office of Shellfish and Water Protection uses national standards to classify all commercial shellfish harvesting areas.

Share on Tumblr