New to be artwork unveiled at Hoquiam Timberland Library

On Wednesday, October 15, from 5 to 6 p.m. at the Hoquiam Timberland Library, artist Jenny Fisher will unveil her latest work – two large murals depicting many of the most beloved icons from children’s and teen literature.

 

Library staff members anticipate a large turnout for the public unveiling and members of the Friends of the Hoquiam Timberland Library, who commissioned and paid for the murals, will be present to celebrate the occasion.

 

Each mural measures 87 by 72 inches and is installed on either side of the Library’s signature stained glass windows, forming a wall of color and fantasy.

 

“This is what I know,” writes Jenny Fisher, “I have been an artist since … 6th grade … and an avid reader since 4th grade when a librarian toured me around the school library. These two identities have enriched my life.”

 

A native of California, Fisher attended college in her home state and in Oregon, majoring in art.  She has lived in Grays Harbor since 1985, establishing herself as a mural artist through Washington State’s 1989 Bicentennial mural project.  Since that time, Fisher has painted numerous public murals in Grays Harbor County.

 

“Through my own childhood, my children’s childhood, and now my grandchildren’s, I have experienced many delightful authors and artists in the children’s section of the library,” Fisher reminisced.  “Of the books depicted on these panels,” she continued, “my favorites include To Kill a Mockingbird, The Chronicles of Narnia, The Jungle Book, Peter Rabbit, Bread and Jam For Francis, The Golden Compass, and Charlotte’s Web … I could have painted on and on.”

 

All programs at Timberland Regional Libraries are free and open to the public.

 

The Hoquiam Timberland Library is located at 420 7th Street. For information, contact the library at (360) 532-1710 or visit www.TRL.org.

FEMA Honors Achievement in Community Preparedness to the Ocosta School District Community

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) today announced the winners of the 2014 FEMA Individual and Community Preparedness Awards, recognizing the outstanding efforts of individuals, programs and organizations throughout the country working to prepare their communities for emergencies.

The community of the Ocosta School District was recognized with an Honorable Mention in the Community Preparedness Heroes category – “In recognition of your service to the whole community, the Federal Emergency Management Agency hereby awards you an honorable mention in the 2014 Individual and Community Preparedness Awards.”

“Strong emergency management requires teamwork, community engagement, innovation and strong relationships at all levels before disasters occur,” FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate said. “This year, we recognize individuals and organizations that exemplify this approach, and I congratulate them on their dedication to make our nation stronger and safer.”

This year’s honorees developed and implemented innovative tools, programs and resources, which provided opportunities for a wide variety of stakeholders to make their communities better prepared and more resilient.

 

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The community of the Ocosta School District, encompassing the entire South Beach area of Grays Harbor County and Pacific County, should be proud of their vision and accomplishment to build the first Tsunami Engineered Safe Haven Building in North America, the Ocosta Elementary School. This historic achievement is a testament to every community member. The new elementary school will stand as a beacon for all communities, large and small, showing what determination, perseverance, compassion and pure grit can accomplish. This could never have been realized without the overwhelming support, effort and foresight of every community member. Congratulations to each and every one of you! – Chuck Wallace, Deputy Director of the Grays Harbor County Emergency Management Agency

Keith Olson – candidate for Commissioner #3 Partisan Office 4-year term

Keith Olson (Prefers Republican Party)

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Continue reading Keith Olson – candidate for Commissioner #3 Partisan Office 4-year term

Historical Seaport revises individual and business membership programs

Aberdeen – Grays Harbor Historical Seaport Authority is pleased to announce significant revisions to its membership program for individuals and businesses. From its earliest years, GHHSA has invited supporters of education programs and its tall ships, Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain, to become members of the organization. Annual memberships help pay ongoing operating expenses, including fuel, provisions, maintenance, and moorage fees.
Individuals may now set their own membership fee that matches their budget. For example, the base Bosun membership allows an annual fee from $25 to $99. Other member levels include: Family ($100 to $499); Captain’s Circle ($500 to $999); Commodore Society ($1,000 to $4,999); Admiral Society ($5,000+). The revised membership program also features a “sustaining member” option, allowing supporters to set up an automated payment plan to make giving easier and lower administrative costs. New members receive a membership card and modest thank-you gift.

 

Businesses and corporations may also set their own annual membership fee that suits their budget and philanthropic goals. Revised business member levels include: Home Port Partner ($250 to $499, Grays Harbor County only); Port Supporter ($500 to $999); Port Partner ($1,000 to $2,499); Port Benefactor ($2,500 to $5,000+). Thank-you gifts for business members include an opportunity to send an individual K-12 student or entire classroom to a one-hour or three-hour education program on a GHHSA ship.

 

Historical Seaport individual and business memberships may be purchased online via credit card at www.historicalseaport.org or by calling 800-200-5239. Prospective members may also request a membership brochure by sending email to membership@historicalseaport.org. More information about memberships is available at the GHHSA website, www.historicalseaport.org.
Editors: Download high-res images of our ships at http://historicalseaport.smugmug.com. Click the “Media Images” category and select a gallery. We welcome media aboard to observe operations and interview crew. Contact (media only) Joe Follansbee, 360-589-0766,jfollansbee@historicalseaport.org. Information is subject to change without notice. Facebook:facebook.com/GHHSA; Twitter: @graysharborhist.

Board of Natural Resources acts to reimburse Pacific and Wahkiakum counties for marbled murrelet restrictions

The state Board of Natural Resources yesterday authorized the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to transfer about 66 acres of forestland, managed for the benefit of Pacific and Wahkiakum counties, into conservation status. The parcels were selected because each has timber harvest restrictions related to the endangered marbled murrelet.

 

“Today’s unanimous action by the Board of Natural Resources shows how the State Forest Trust Land Replacement Program is working to support struggling rural timber economies while protecting habitat for the marbled murrelet and other endangered species,” said Peter Goldmark, Commissioner of Public Lands, who chairs the Board of Natural Resources.

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As a result of the board’s action, Pacific County will receive $356,000, based on the timber value of about 17 acres of State Forest Trust land, when the parcel is transferred into the Naselle Highlands Natural Resources Conservation Area (NRCA). The legislatively funded replacement program for state trust lands also will provide about $25,000 for DNR to purchase replacement working forestland better suited for producing revenue that supports county services.

 

In a separate action through the replacement program, Wahkiakum County will receive $320,000, based on the timber value of 49 acres of State Forest Trust land, when it is transferred into the Skamokawa Creek NRCA. DNR will use the parcel’s land value of $73,000 to buy replacement working forestland.

 

Created in 2011 by the legislature, the State Forest Trust Land Replacement Program allows DNR to transfer certain state-owned forestlands that are encumbered by federal endangered species restrictions into conservation status and replace them with other working forestlands. The replacement program targets small, economically stressed rural Washington counties that depend heavily on timber revenue to support public services.

 

Addition to Elk River NRCA
The board today also approved the transfer of 194 acres of state trust land into the Elk River NRCA through the state’s Trust Land Transfer Program. The $1.6 million timber value of the parcel, located near Westport in Grays Harbor County, will be used to support public school construction statewide. Its $349,000 land value will be used to purchase a less environmentally sensitive replacement property for the Common School Trust. The 5,413-acre Elk River NRCA contains the largest and highest quality, intact estuarine system remaining in Washington or Oregon.

 

In other actions, the board authorized DNR to offer $217,000 to purchase a 40-acre property west of Lake Roesiger in Snohomish County from a willing private seller. The acquisition will add to the Roesiger State Forest which DNR manages. The board also authorized DNR to purchase a 130-acre parcel of Douglas-fir and red alder abutting a large block of state trust forest in Pacific County for $495,000. Both properties will be managed for long-term revenue for the Common School Trust.

Vehicle of missing Seattle woman found abandoned near Neilton

The vehicle of a missing Seattle woman was located last week in the Olympic National Forest, 33 year old Donna Van Zandt was not. Chief Criminal Deputy Steve Shumate tells KBKW last Friday evening, United States Forrest Service notified the Sheriff’s Department of an abandoned 2000 Honda Civic that had been located by hunters scouting an area near Neilton. The location was a very remote logging road approximately 5 miles in on Quinault Ridge Road. A deputy was eventually able to make his way to the vehicle and determined the car most likely had been at the location for several months due to the vegetation that had grown up around the car. The keys to the vehicle were still inside in addition to camping and hiking gear. There was no other obvious information to indicate what may have happened to the driver/occupants.

Donna Van Zandt

The vehicle was registered to Donna Van Zandt, a 33 year old female from Seattle. On Saturday investigators worked on locating family and friends of Van Zandt. At this point, it appears the last family contact was in April of 2014. Family members did explain that in January of this year, Van Zandt’s father was apparently murdered in New York, and April was the 2nd anniversary of her mother’s passing.

On Sunday, numerous search and rescue members searched the area where Van Zandt’s vehicle was located. Van Zandt was not located on that day.

Here is the vehicle that was located, in addition to a picture of Van Zandt.

Anyone with information regarding the whereabouts of Van Zandt is asked to call Detective Keith Peterson of the Grays Harbor County Sheriff’s Office at 360-249-3711.

Donna Van Zandt car

Grays Harbor tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain return to port in September

Grays Harbor’s two tall ships return to their home port of Aberdeen next month for public tours and sailings before heading to California for their 2014-2015 tour of Golden State ports. Hawaiian Chieftain arrives at Seaport Landing on Sept. 4 for brief stay through Sept. 7. In addition to making final preparations for California, she’ll offer public tours on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, as well as public Adventure Sails at 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6 and Sunday, Sept. 7. Tickets are $43 all ages.
Lady Washington arrives at Seaport Landing Sept. 16 for a 17-day stay in Grays Harbor, including two days at Westport Sept. 27-28. During her time at Seaport Landing, crews on Lady Washington will conduct routine maintenance and offer public tours and excursions. The ship is open for tours Tuesday to Friday, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Here’s the excursion schedule:
9/20-21: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Adventure Sail, $43. (Seaport Landing)
9/27-28: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Adventure Sail, $43. (Westport Marina)
Purchase tickets at www.historicalseaport.org or call 800-200-5239.
Lady Washington is also booking K-12 educational programs for Grays Harbor County schools. One-hour dockside and three-hour sailing programs are available. Discounted pricing is also available for eligible schools. For information, contact Roxie Underwood, 800-200-5239, runderwood@historicalseaport.org.
Lady Washington’s visit to Westport coincides with the third annual Salmon Tales Festival, a celebration of the region’s iconic fish and the local fishing industry. Festival information is at http://salmontales.info/.
Launched in 1989 as part of the Washington Centennial celebrations, Lady Washington was designed by Ray Wallace as a replica of one of the first U.S.-flagged vessels to explore the west coast of North America. She was named by state’s tall ship ambassador by the Legislature in 2007, and she sails to more than 40 ports a year in Washington, Oregon, and California offering K-12 education programs and excursions. Launched in 1988, Hawaiian Chieftain was designed by Raymond Richards and built at the Lahaina Welding Company in Hawaii. The vessel specializes in educational programs for young people.

 

Editors: Download high-res images of our ships at http://historicalseaport.smugmug.com. Click the “Media Images” category and select a gallery. We welcome media aboard to observe operations and interview crew. Contact (media only) Joe Follansbee, 360-589-0766, jfollansbee@historicalseaport.org. Information is subject to change without notice. Facebook: facebook.com/GHHSA; Twitter: @graysharborhist.

Wes Cormier – Grays Harbor County Commissioner

Wes Cormier talks about the shortest meeting in recent memory, budgets, and county revenues are on the rise. “Levy Shift I vote NO”

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The county’s lawsuit over property program. “We’ll see how this goes, [but] I really feel like we’re on the right side of this.”

Community Foundation awards $128,900 in Discretionary Grants and $40,000 in After School Program Fund Grants

The Grays Harbor Community Foundation is pleased to be able to invest $128,900 into the community through its third quarter discretionary grants cycle. The Foundation has long been a resource to Grays Harbor County nonprofit organizations by offering a quarterly discretionary grants cycle. This quarter, the Foundation awarded 13 grants that totaled $128,900 in discretionary funding. “This is the largest discretionary grants cycle, in terms of number of applications, as well breadth of organizations requesting funding,” Program Officer Cassie Lentz said. “We were pleased to see the extensiveness of programs and projects that were seeking funding, from all corners of our county and beyond.”

The organizations that were funded through this discretionary grants cycle include: Montesano Community Outreach for summer art camps, Our Aberdeen for mural restorations, Grays Harbor College for making ballet performance accessible to children, Thurston County Volunteer Legal Services for legal advice clinics in Grays Harbor County, Nonprofit Leaders Conference of Southwest WA for their 2014 conference, Artic Community Association for roof repairs, Child Care Action Council for their “Raising A Reader” program, Aberdeen Revitalization Movement for phase one of their operations, Catholic Community Services for the Grays Harbor Youth Center, Beyond Survival for the “Where We Live” program, McCleary School District for STEAM education, Northwest Justice Project for an employment opportunities legal fellowship in Grays Harbor, and Montesano School District for the field turf project at Jack Rottle field.

The Grays Harbor Community Foundation was also able to award $40,000 to four After School Programs here on the Harbor through a designated fund set up specifically for that benefit. Supported programs included: McCleary School District, Montesano Community Outreach, North Beach School District, and the YMCA of Grays Harbor for Harbor After-School program sites in Hoquiam, Elma and McCleary.

Grays Harbor Community Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization with a mission “to improve the quality of life in the communities throughout Grays Harbor County.” This is accomplished through many projects and processes that work through or in support of other non-profit organizations, including a quarterly discretionary grants cycle with applications accepted on the first business day of January, April, July and October.

Tax deductible donations may be made to:
Grays Harbor Community Foundation, P.O. Box 615, Hoquiam, WA 98550
You may find out more by checking the foundation website: www.gh-cf.org or you may contact the Foundation staff at 532-1600 or by e-mail at: info@gh-cf.org.

Forest Service Road improvement could block access on the West Fork Humptulips River

The National Forest Service plans to block vehicle access to a popular gravel bar on the West Fork of the Humptulips River through proposed improvements to Forest Service Road 2203040 that include a turnaround and parking lot. State Representative Brian Blake is opposed to some of those changes, he tells KBKW “There’s a small rivulet that has been diverted and now runs down the access road to the gravel bar, and they’re using it as an excuse to cut off access, and that’s what I’m opposed to.”
The $12,000 Forest Service grant application says they need to block the access to restore fish habitat for salmon and trout apparently seen in the mud puddle for the past three years. “Oh no I’ve never seen salmon there in my life, no. Why would they do that?” I spoke with Jerry Lillybridge in front of his 24 foot camper responsibly parked on the gravel bar Sunday. He said he and his family have camped there for years, and while he hasn’t run over any fish that he can recall “Here’s what I’ve seen in the last three days, the otters, we’ve seen the ducks, yesterday I was up here getting firewood and I saw a red hawk take a grouse out and I’ve never seen nothing like that in my life, right in front of us.”
Lillybridge worked in the Grays Harbor County Auditor’s office for years, and for years he passed State parks, camp sites, and groomed fishing outlets on his way out here. “You can’t go nowhere and enjoy this without a big fee, or having a lot of people around you. I’m 41 miles from my house in Aberdeen to right here, and look at this – this is remote. There’s nothing more beautiful than here,” adding that most campers clean up after themselves, but; “If they don’t and most of them always leave it clean, I clean it up anyway because I don’t want the Forest Service to ever shut something down because I was messy.”
Meanwhile Blake worries “When we loose that gravel bar, and they won’t commit to preserving access to the downstream gravel bar – and I believe personally that’s critical for the launching of the drift boats especially because they can be anywhere from 300 to 600 pounds. So I think it’s important that we preserve that public access, for those boats, to the public river.” Blake added that “Not everybody can afford a forest pass, not everybody can afford a travel trailer. But having the public be able to pull out there and have a picnic, or spend the night in the summertime, I think is one of the reasons we live here.
While it won’t be specifically addressed at these meetings, the public has a few more chances to provide their input on a sustainable roads plan for the Forest Service this month.  The next meeting starts at 4 this afternoon in the Shelton Civic Center. They’ll be at the Aberdeen Rotary Log Pavilion Thursday afternoon.