• An Olympic marmot seen at Hurricane Hill, holds the root of a plant in its paw.
Ken and Mary Campbell

    Olympic National Park Seeks Volunteer Citizen Scientists to Study Olympic Marmots

    The Olympic National Park is now accepting volunteer applications for the Olympic Marmot Monitoring Program 2015 survey season. Launched in 2010, the Olympic Marmot Monitoring Program employs teams of volunteers to visit designated survey areas within the park and gather timely and vital information about the Olympic marmot’s population presence and distribution. The Olympic marmot […]

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  • New grassroots partnership aims to improve grass, roots, on Olympic National Forest

    OLYMPIA, Wash. – Representative Derek Kilmer and a group of conservation, timber and local government stakeholders today announced the formation of new a partnership called the Olympic Peninsula Collaborative. Members of the partnership approved the following statement to explain its purpose and goals:

    The Olympic Peninsula Collaborative will bring together stakeholders from the environmental community, the timber industry, and representatives from federal and local government around shared goals of increasing timber harvest from the Olympic National Forest while benefitting the environmental quality of our forests and watersheds. The Collaborative will work together and with federal officials to address issues that stand in the way of achieving the stated goals. Ultimately, the purpose is to show we can simultaneously create a more environmentally sound forest, provide for increased, sustainable timber harvests on the Olympic National Forest, and provide economic benefits to timber communities on the Peninsula.

    I have always said that we don’t have to choose between economic development and environmental protection. This is the beginning of a long-term partnership that I hope will help prove that’s true. The Olympic Peninsula Collaborative will show we can build consensus and can bring folks together to simultaneously create a more environmentally healthy forest, provide for increased, sustainable timber harvests on the Olympic National Forest, and provide economic benefits to timber communities on the Peninsula.
    – U.S. Representative Derek Kilmer
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  • Impacts of federal shutdown on Washington State

    OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) – The federal government has begun a partial shutdown after congressional Republicans demanded changes in the nation’s health care law as the price for essential federal funding and President Barack Obama and Democrats refused.

    Here’s a look at how services in Washington state are likely to be affected, beginning Tuesday.


    In spite of the fact that funding of the health care law is at the center of the budget battle in Congress, implementation of key parts of the law begin Tuesday regardless of any shutdown. Open enrollment begins Tuesday, and consumers will be able to start purchasing health plans that would take effect on Jan. 1.


    Deliveries will continue as usual. The U.S. Postal Service relies on income from stamps and other postal fees to keep running and receives no tax dollars for day-to-day operations.

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  • Users help Forest Service rethink its road system

    EVERETT, Wash. – Every National Forest has to come up with a new plan for its road system in the next couple of years – and in one Washington forest, that effort has become a way to open up the planning process to those who use and love the area.

    On the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, people can let forest managers know which roads they use and what they think of them, in a series of meetings and on a public website

    Forest Supervisor Jennifer Eberlien says what has most pleased her is seeing how strongly people feel about their public land.

    “We provide a lot of resources and experiences and services,” she says, “so the interest and that level of passion of the people who are attending and giving input is just fantastic. It’s one of the things that really keeps us as Forest Service employees, going.”

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