New Washington Board meeting to prioritize removal of fish barriers statewide

A new board responsible for restoring fish habitat by expediting the removal of fish barriers in Washington’s streams will hold its first meeting June 17 in Olympia.

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Aberdeen Graduate Sues District

ABERDEEN, Wash. - A 19-year-old graduate from Aberdeen High School is suing the school district there, saying officials did nothing to keep him from being bullied.
Russell Dickerson III says he was subject to repeated bullying because he's black and because of his perceived sexual orientation.


He says that in one of the incidents three students pushed him down and smashed an egg on his head. He says that in 2007 students in the district created a website mocking him and posting threatening and racist comments.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Washington, which is representing Dickerson, says the district did nothing to stop the harassment even after a judge issued a no contact order between Dickerson and one of his harassers.


The lawsuit filed in federal court in Tacoma says the district violated the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and state anti-discrimination law.

Aberdeen School District superintendent Thomas Opstad released a statement yesterday afternoon that while the district had not yet received a copy of the lawsuit filed,

Dickerson is currently a member of School staff providing tutoring to elementary school students, and said that his employment is indicitive of the fact that he feels comfortable in the school district.

Aberdeen Graduate Sues District

ABERDEEN, Wash. - A 19-year-old graduate from Aberdeen High School is suing the school district there, saying officials did nothing to keep him from being bullied.
Russell Dickerson III says he was subject to repeated bullying because he's black and because of his perceived sexual orientation.
He says that in one of the incidents three students pushed him down and smashed an egg on his head. He says that in 2007 students in the district created a website mocking him and posting threatening and racist comments.
The American Civil Liberties Union of Washington, which is representing Dickerson, says the district did nothing to stop the harassment even after a judge issued a no contact order between Dickerson and one of his harassers.
The lawsuit filed in federal court in Tacoma says the district violated the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and state anti-discrimination law.
Aberdeen School District superintendent Thomas Opstad could not be immediately reached for comment Tuesday.

Washington Takes Place in Roadless Recreation Week

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Governors' proclamations in multiple states, including Washington, recognize August 7-15 as the country's first Roadless Recreation Week. Washington is home to almost two million acres of roadless Forest Service land.

Tom Uniak, conservation director for the Washington Wilderness Coalition, says he often tells people that it's almost impossible to be more than 20 miles from a road anywhere in the United States, so having land that is unspoiled by pavement or tire tracks is rarer than many folks realize.

"Roadless areas are the third of our national forest system that has not been logged and developed. They are Forest Service lands only, and so they are not national parks; and they are basically protected from road development."

Washington Attorney General reels in refunds for consumers hooked by Aussies’ quack medicine Web sites

SEATTLE – It’s a g’day at the Washington Attorney General’s Office, where attorneys reached a settlement with a pair of Aussies who used sexy stories to sell bogus health cures over the Internet.

“The Internet has become a planet-wide hunting ground for fraudsters who lurk just below the surface like crocs in a river," Attorney General Rob McKenna said. “But this case proves that whether they're on the prowl in Seattle or Sydney, they’re still within justice’s reach.”

The deceptive business practices of Leanne Rita Vassallo and Aaron David Smith came to light last summer when the Attorney General’s Office filed a civil lawsuit accusing the pair of violating Washington’s Consumer Protection Act. The defendants, both of Cecil Hills, a suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, became millionaires while selling e-books for health conditions ranging from acne and asthma to sexually transmitted diseases and cancer.

Two Fishermen and Fish Company Manager Face Thousands in Fines for Fishing Violations

CHINOOK, Wash. - Three men involved in illegally harvesting sablefish in 2005, were sentenced today in U.S. District Court in Tacoma to fines and restitution. JON SCHULTZ, 46, ROBERT GREENFIELD, 40 and KENNETH GREENFIELD, 51, all of Chinook, Washington, were sentenced on the misdemeanor charge of failing to exercise due care while trafficking in illegally obtained fish.   Fisherman KENNETH GREENFIELD was fined $16,479 and ordered to pay restitution to the State of Washington of $16,479. His brother, fisherman ROBERT GREENFIELD was fined $11,604 and ordered to pay restitution to Washington State of $11,604. SCHULTZ, an employee of Bell Buoy Crab Company was fined $10,000. All three men paid their fines and restitution in court this morning.

 
            According to the plea agreements filed in the case, in the summer and fall of 2005, SCHULTZ was the Production Manager for Bell Buoy Crab Company of Chinook, Washington. He was responsible for purchasing sablefish, also known as black cod, from area fishermen including the GREENFIELDs. Federal groundfish regulations establish harvest levels and seasons for the fish. In order to determine how much fish is being taken, fish processing facilities such as Bell Buoy are required to fill out a “fish receiving ticket” and provide a copy to the fishermen with the accurate date and weight of the catch. 

Washington Attorney General claims Aussie pair became rich using sexy stories to sell bogus cures

SEATTLE - The Washington State Attorney General's Office has ventured to the Land Down Under to stop a pair of Aussies from using sexy stories to sell bogus cures for diseases ranging from Lyme disease to cancer.

"Scammers who hide behind foreign borders aren't out of justice's reach," McKenna said. "This case is proof that we're willing to go the extra mile - or in this case, nearly 8,000 miles - to protect consumers."