House mover to save Olympic National Park chalet

An historic Olympic National Park lodge teetering on the edge of the Quinault River should be moved next month before it falls into the water.

The park has awarded a $124,000 contract to the Monroe House Moving company of Carlsborg to move the Enchanted Valley Chalet to safer ground.

The Peninsula Daily News reports (http://is.gd/JkU7T7) most materials will be packed in by mule because the site is in a wilderness area. The park service will provide a helicopter for big equipment.

The chalet is located 13 miles from the nearest road. It was built as a backcountry lodge in the 1930s, before the creation of the park. More recently, it has been used as a wilderness ranger station and emergency shelter.

The Grays Harbor PUD has announced a planned power outage in the South Beach area that will impact about 5,000 customers from the Ocean Spray facility in Markham west to the ocean beaches and south to Tokeland.

The outage will start at 10PM on September 11, 2014 and is expected to last until 6:00 AM on September 12.

Whooping cough cases decrease in WA but not gone

LONGVIEW, Wash. (AP) — As Oregon and national health officials raise the alarm about whooping cough in the Pacific Northwest, Washington health officials report the illness is declining.

The Daily News reports (http://is.gd/kcEqfK ) that by mid-July this year, there were 419 cases of whooping cough or pertussis in Washington state. That’s down considerably from the same period in 2012 when 3,237 cases were reported.

State health officials say 14 Washington counties have reported no pertussis at all this year.

These statistics clash with a statement issued Tuesday by the Oregon March of Dimes, which said pertussis cases in the Northwest have essentially tripled over several years.

Oregon cases did increase from 2011 to 2012, but they started declining in 2013. Michele M. Larsen of the March of Dimes Greater Oregon Chapter told The Daily News chapter officials were not aware of the latest figures.

Wash. woman gets nearly 3 years in swindle

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) – Federal prosecutors say an Ocean Park, Wash., woman has been sentenced to nearly three years in prison for swindling a retired St. Helens, Ore., man out of nearly $650,000.

Lisa Mottaghi was sentenced Wednesday in federal court in Portland for wire fraud. The U.S. attorney’s office says she first borrowed large sums of money from 74-year-old Gerald Voorhees and later created a false email identity to get more money from him.

The Daily News of Longview reports (http://is.gd/RWPujl ) the woman was also ordered to pay restitution.

Information from: The Daily News, http://www.tdn.com

Dog defends owner in Castle Rock attack

CASTLE ROCK, Wash. (AP) – Police in the southwest Washington community of Castle Rock say a female jogger’s dog attacked and chased off a man who had knocked the woman down in an attempt to grab her cell phone.

The Daily News of Longview reports (http://is.gd/EeCsse ) the 22-year-old woman was not seriously hurt. She was jogging with two dogs on a trail along the Cowlitz River dike when a man jumped out of the bushes last Thursday evening. Police say 1 of the dogs attacked and the man ran off.

Now police are warning walkers and joggers to be alert on the popular river trail system. They say the man was described as shirtless and shoeless with shaggy blond hair and scruffy facial hair.

A police dog searched the area unsuccessfully.

Information from: The Daily News, http://www.tdn.com

South Olympic Peninsula Outdoor Adventure & Recreation Expo Hits Elma Next Month

“We are blessed with a diverse topography from spectacular mountains, lakes, forests, streams, estuaries and ocean beaches that are inhabited by a wide range of fish, shellfish, wildlife and game,” Fair and Events Coordinator Rod Easton said. “All this makes for a tremendous opportunity for outdoor enthusiasts. Along with fishing, hunting and camping enthusiasts, we will also welcome surfers, cyclists, kayakers, hikers and boaters. There are also several surprises in store to insure that the event is attractive to a full-spectrum of people who simply enjoy what Mother Nature has to offer in Grays Harbor and Mason counties.”

Mike Bruner, the Fairgrounds and Tourism Department Manager, said “This is an event that our management team has wanted to host for a long time. We had been brain-storming on this for quite a while. Brent and Rod had worked hard to put together the groundwork for the show and were ready to announce it to the public when, ironically, we were contacted by Dale Hubbard, from the Mason County Daily News. He had been working on a similar event in Mason County that hadn’t made it off the ground yet. We all thought, wow…. This would be a great opportunity for stakeholders in the outdoor and tourism industries within the two Counties to get together to promote our outdoor assets, as well as our related businesses and lodging providers, to Western Washington Sportsmen. As an avid outdoorsman, I’m excited for the event.”

Longview port to receive Hawaiian garbage

     LONGVIEW, Wash. (AP) – The Port of Longview will process garbage from Hawaii heading to Washington landfills under an agreement recently reached with a shipping company.

Port officials say the deal reached with Daybreak Transportation and Rail Transfer will create more hours for local longshoremen and more work for the little-used crane.

The Longview Daily News reports the garbage, shrink-wrapped in plastic and stored in steel shipping containers, will be unloaded at the port to trucks or trains.

Broadcasting pioneer Paul Harvey dies at age of 90

In 2005, Harvey was one of 14 notables chosen as recipients of the presidential Medal of Freedom. He also was an inductee in the Radio Hall of Fame, as was Lynne.

Former President George W. Bush remembered Harvey as a “friendly and familiar voice in the lives of millions of Americans.”

“His commentary entertained, enlightened, and informed,” Bush said in a statement. “Laura and I are pleased to have known this fine man, and our thoughts and prayers are with his family.”

Harvey composed his twice-daily news commentaries from a downtown Chicago office near Lake Michigan.

Rising at 3:30 each morning, he ate a bowl of oatmeal, then combed the news wires and spoke with editors across the country in search of succinct tales of American life for his program.

At the peak of his career, Harvey reached more than 24 million listeners on more than 1,200 radio stations and charged $30,000 to give a speech. His syndicated column was carried by 300 newspapers.

His fans identified with his plainspoken political commentary, but critics called him an out-of-touch conservative. He was an early supporter of the late Sen. Joseph McCarthy and a longtime backer of the Vietnam War.

Perhaps Harvey’s most famous broadcast came in 1970, when he abandoned that stance, announcing his opposition to President Nixon’s expansion of the war and urging him to get out completely.

“Mr. President, I love you … but you’re wrong,” Harvey said, shocking his faithful listeners and drawing a barrage of letters and phone calls, including one from the White House.

In 1976, Harvey began broadcasting his anecdotal descriptions of the lives of famous people. “The Rest of the Story” started chronologically, with the person’s identity revealed at the end. The stories were an attempt to capture “the heartbeats behind the headlines.” Much of the research and writing was done by his son, Paul Jr.

Harvey also blended news with advertising, a line he said he crossed only for products he trusted.

In 2000, at age 82, he signed a new 10-year contract with ABC Radio Networks.

Harvey was born Paul Harvey Aurandt in Tulsa, Okla. His father, a police officer, was killed when he was a toddler. A high school teacher took note of his distinctive voice and launched him on a broadcast career.

While working at St. Louis radio station KXOK, he met Washington University graduate student Lynne Cooper. He proposed on their first date (she said “no”) and always called her “Angel.” They were married in 1940 and had a son, Paul Jr.

They worked closely together on his shows, and he often credited his success to her influence. She was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 1997, seven years after her husband was. She died in May 2008.