Track the canoes online for 2013 Paddle to Quinault

TAHOLAH, Wash. - Some of the traditional Native Cedar canoes destined for the 2013 Paddle to Quinault can now be tracked online at www.tinyurl.com/K77zryw. The site, which is updated every ten minutes, features the progress of canoes from the Bella Bella and T’Sou-Ke First Nation of Canada and the Grand Ronde, Lower Elwha, Muckleshoot, Squaxin Island, Swinomish and Warm Springs tribes.

Lady Washington — with Marco Black Sr. and Quinault Fishing Guide-Ruben Estavillo.            In all, approximately 100 canoes are expected to arrive at Quinault for traditional welcoming ceremonies on Thursday August 1, according to Fawn Sharp, President of the Quinault Indian Nation.

            It has been 24 years since “Paddle to Seattle” first revitalized this long held Northwest tribal tradition, and the event has gained momentum throughout the Northwest ever since, said Sharp.

            “The cedar canoe holds great meaning for tribes throughout the Northwest and western Canada,” she said. “The annual journey reaches deep into the hearts and souls of our people—both young and old, and helps them fully realize the vitality and spiritual strength of their tribal identity, underscoring our hope for a sustainable and positive future,” she said.

            This year’s journey is also expected to draw an estimated 15,000 tribal and non-tribal visitors to the Land of the Quinault. The destination is Point Grenville, a Quinault beach near Taholah, approximately 40 miles north of Ocean Shores.

Paddle to Quinault Scheduled August 1-6, Volunteers Welcome

TAHOLAH, Wash. - The Quinault Indian Nation and the Quinault Canoe Society will proudly host the Paddle to Quinault 2013 August 1-6. All comers are welcome and volunteers are encouraged to register at www.PaddletoQuinault.org

             It has been 24 years since “Paddle to Seattle” first revitalized this long held Northwest tribal tradition, and the event has gained momentum throughout the Northwest ever since.

            “The cedar canoe holds great meaning for tribes throughout the Northwest and western Canada,” said Fawn Sharp, President of the Quinault Nation and of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians. “The annual journey reaches deep into the hearts and souls of our people—both young and old, and helps them fully realize the vitality and spiritual strength of their tribal identity, underscoring our hope for a sustainable and positive future,” she said.

            This year’s journey is expected to draw an estimated 100 cedar canoes and 15,000 tribal and non-tribal visitors to the Land of the Quinault on the Pacific Coast. The destination is Point Grenville, a Quinault beach near Taholah, approximately 40 miles north of Ocean Shores.

Paddle to Quinault