Denny’s Restaurant to open its doors in Aberdeen November 9th

On Sunday, Nov. 9, at 6 p.m., a new Denny’s will open its doors in Aberdeen (418 W. Heron Street), unveiling its all-new, locally-inspired design and diner menu with an all day celebration. To celebrate the opening of its newest location and thank the surrounding community for its support, Denny’s will offer games and prizes along with giveaways of some of the diner’s most beloved dishes all day on Wednesday, Nov. 19.

At Denny’s, America’s diner, everyone is always welcome – welcome to drop in 24/7, welcome to enjoy good food and great value, and now Denny’s welcomes local residents, guests and visitors to stop by its newest location in Aberdeen. Located at 418 W. Heron Street, the new diner will officially open its doors on Sunday, Nov. 9, at 6 p.m.

To celebrate the opening of its newest location and thank the surrounding community for its support, Denny’s will offer games and prizes along with giveaways of some of the diner’s most beloved dishes all day on Wednesday, Nov. 19. The first 100 guests to stop by the restaurant between 9 and 10 a.m. will receive a free Grand Slam breakfast, which includes two buttermilk pancakes, two eggs cooked to order, two bacon strips and two sausage links; the first 25 guests to dine with Denny’s from noon to 1 p.m. will get a free classic hamburger and fries and the first 25 guests from 6 p.m. onward will get a free dinner entrée.

“As America’s diner, Denny’s guests have come to our diners to sit back, relax and enjoy delicious, hearty meals for more than 60 years. We hope to bring that same sense of community to Aberdeen with this new restaurant,” said Denny’s district manager Prashant Sharan. “From breakfast any time to satisfying lunches and dinners, if hungry fans are in the mood for it, chances are we’re serving it.”

The new diner will have a significant impact on the Aberdeen community by creating more than 50 jobs for local residents and is conveniently situated at the corner of West Heron and South Jefferson Streets, next to the L&I Department and near the Safeway.  Denny’s is also known for providing its customers with tremendous value, including these great deals:

  • $2 $4 $6 $8 Value Menu® – Denny’s all day, every day value menu lets guests choose from 16 dishes at affordable prices, including traditional favorites as well as several new a la carte items.

 

  • Kids Eat Free – Guests can receive up to two free kids meal for children ages 10 and under with the purchase of each adult entrée. The offer is good from 4 to 10 p.m. on Tuesdays, and menu items and prices may vary.

 

  • “Fit Fare” – Delicious choices that are good for you, too.  Denny’s “Fit Fare” options feature healthy choices like egg whites and hearty wheat breads that can be substituted into any meal for no extra charge. Using the expansive Build Your Own Grand Slam® menu, diners have more than 250 ways to build a meal with 550 calories or less, and 32 ways to build a meal of 400 calories or less. With plenty of simple substitutions and healthy “Fit Fare” entrees found throughout the lunch and dinner menu, Denny’s makes it easy for you to eat well on the go.

 

  • Free Birthday Grand Slam®– Celebrate your special day with a free Original Grand Slam® meal at participating Denny’s restaurants. The Original Grand Slam® offer is free for the birthday guy or gal who can show proof that it’s their birthday, and is good for dine-in only.

 

  • AARP Members Save 15 Percent – Show your AARP membership card at participating Denny’s restaurants and save 15 percent off your total check.

 

About Denny’s Corp.

Denny’s is one of America’s largest full-service family restaurant chains, currently operating more than 1,680 franchised, licensed and company-owned restaurants across the United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Mexico, Honduras, Guam, Puerto Rico and New Zealand. For further information on Denny’s, including news releases, please visit the Denny’s website at www.dennys.com.

 

Connect with Denny’s

For news and updates on Denny’s please visit the brand’s social channels via Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest or Youtube.

WDFW Commission sets waterfowl seasons, discusses elk with hoof disease

With a record number of ducks counted on the northern breeding grounds this year, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission approved migratory waterfowl hunting seasons for this fall and winter during a public meeting in Olympia Aug. 8-9.

The commission, a citizen panel appointed by the governor to set policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), also approved a new regulation that requires hunters to leave on site the hooves of any elk taken in southwest Washington to help minimize the spread of a disease that affects the region’s herds.

Under the waterfowl hunting package, most hunting opportunities in Washington will be similar to last year. That includes a statewide duck season that will be open for 107 days, starting Oct. 11-15 and continuing Oct. 18-Jan. 25. A special youth hunting weekend also is scheduled Sept. 20-21.

Limits for mallard, pintail, scaup, redhead, goldeneye, harlequin, scoter and long-tailed duck will remain the same as last season. But the commission reduced the daily bag limit for canvasback to one per day because of decreasing numbers throughout North America.

Goose hunting seasons will vary among management areas across the state, but most open mid-October and run through late January. Limits for most geese did not change, except the commission did increase the daily bag limit for cackling geese in southwest Washington from three to four.

The commission also increased the overall harvest quota for dusky Canada geese in southwest Washington from 45 to 85 birds. As in previous years, hunters are limited to one dusky Canada goose a season in southwest Washington.

The goose and duck hunting seasons approved by the commission are based on state and federal waterfowl population estimates and guidelines. According to those estimates, a record number of ducks – approximately 49 million – were on the breeding grounds this spring in Canada and the United States.

Details on the waterfowl hunting seasons will be available later this week on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/regulations/.

In other action, the commission approved several land transactions, including the purchase of two parcels totaling nearly 2,900 acres of shrub-steppe in Yakima County. The land, located about five miles west of Naches, serves as critical habitat for a variety of wildlife, and is an important connection between summer and winter range for the Yakima elk herd.

The two parcels will be acquired through a partnership with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Cowiche Canyon Conservancy and the state Department of Ecology (DOE). The 2,588-acre property will be purchased for $1.38 million, while a 305-acre property will cost $170,000.

DOE and the Kennewick Irrigation District are providing the funding to acquire the two parcels to mitigate for the loss of shrub-steppe habitat that was converted to agricultural land. The properties will be managed as part of WDFW’s Oak Creek Wildlife Area.

The commission also received a briefing on a scientific panel’s determination that the disease that leaves elk in the St. Helens and Willapa Hills areas of southwest Washington with misshapen hooves likely involves a type of bacterial infection.

Members of the panel, composed of veterinarians and researchers throughout the state, agreed that the disease closely resembles contagious ovine digital dermatitis in sheep. The panel’s diagnosis is consistent with the findings of the USDA National Animal Disease Center and four other independent diagnostic laboratories that have tested samples of elk hooves submitted by WDFW since last year.

For more information on elk hoof disease, see WDFW’s recent news release at http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/jun2314a/ and the department’s wildlife health webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/health/hoof_disease/.

In other business, the commission conducted public hearings on the 2015-2021 Game Management Plan and proposed updates to the state Hydraulic Code.

The commission also received briefings on the department’s legislative proposals for 2015, proposed 2015-2017 operating and capital budget requests, and new potential revenue sources.

In addition, the commission was briefed on the impacts of a possible reduction in state General Funds. The potential cuts are in response to Gov. Jay Inslee’s directive to state agencies to prioritize their activities and identify reductions totaling 15 percent.

Lady Washington & Hawaiian Chieftain seek crew for special Canadian film charter July 13-17

Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain have immediate needs for crew during a special Canadian film charter July 13-17, 2014. Due to confidentiality, we can’t tell you the name of the production, but it’s happening in BC waters.
 
Both boats need licensed and unlicensed crew at all levels who have valid passports or enhanced Washington State drivers licenses and can travel into and out of Canada. You’ll join the ship in Anacortes, Wash., on July 12 and return to Anacortes on July 17. You’ll come home with a great story to tell. You may be able to stay with the boats longer if the need arises.
For details, please contact Roxie Underwood,runderwood@historicalseaport.org, 800-200-5239 today. Sailing experience preferred.
If you can’t join us for this charter, Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain need experienced crew during the rest of summer season in Puget Sound. A full listing of available paid positions on Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain is available on the Jobs page of our website.

WSDOT will curb road construction to keep traffic moving over Memorial weekend

Using the Washington State Department of Transportation predicted travel volumes and online tools is the key to starting roadway travel for Memorial Day 2014.

With summer travel season getting underway and weather reports calling for just a few scattered rain showers, travel is expected to increase on typical holiday travel routes, including Interstate 90 over Snoqualmie Pass, US 2 over Stevens Pass, Interstate 5 through Thurston and Pierce counties and I-5 between Bellingham and the U.S./Canada Border.

In addition to the holiday weekend travel guide, real-time travel and traffic information are also available. These include:

  • Online tools that provide traffic camera images, ferry schedules and a map of highway incidents and closures.
  • The 511 travel information hotline. For out-of-state callers, it’s 1-800-695-ROAD (7623).
  • The WSDOT mobile appemail alerts and other tools, such asTwitter and Facebook.
  • Overhead and roadside electronic signs.
  • Highway advisory stations, 530 AM or 1610 AM.

Please remember to drive sober, safe and avoid distractions as any traffic collision or incident can result in additional traffic congestion.

To help ease traffic congestion, WSDOT and its contractors will suspend most state highway construction work at noon Friday, May 23, until Monday, May 26.

SR 520 weekend toll rates will apply Monday, May 26, due to the holiday. There is good news for Lake Washington boaters: the State Route 520 Floating Bridge and Landings Project contractor will open the east navigation channel underneath the existing SR 520 Bridge for holiday boat traffic from 9 a.m. Friday, May 23, to 7 a.m. Tuesday, May 27.

Travelers whose weekend plans include a trip by ferry, train, personal aircraft or bus should also make plans to avoid holiday delays:

  • Washington State Ferries expects heavy traffic Memorial Day weekend, and suggests that ferry riders consider traveling outside of peak times. Holiday schedules and other information can be found online or by calling 888-808-7977.
  • Amtrak Cascades offers 18 stops along the I-5 corridor. Amtrak Cascades trains often sell out during holidays so make reservations early. Plan to arrive one hour before the train leaves. Check online or call 800-USA-RAIL for more information.
  • WSDOT provides updates on state-operated airports. Check online or call 800-552-0666 for information.
  • Most public transit systems will follow a holiday schedule, and some transit systems will not operate fixed-route or Dial-a-Ride service on Memorial Day.

Aberdeen High School spring musical “Aida” opens today

Tickets are now on sale for “Aida, the Musical” to be performed at Aberdeen High School Thursday to Sunday, May 1-4, under the direction of Tamara Helland and music director J.R. Lakey, and featuring hit songs by Elton John and Tim Rice.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for students (18 and under). They are available through Aberdeen High School, Rosevear’s and Harbor Drug, or at the door.

The performances include two evening shows and two matinees. They are scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, May 1, and Friday, May 2, and at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 3 and May 4.

The cast includes:

Keola Holt as Aida

Kyle Brewer as Radames

Libby Carrico as Amneris

Justin Greco as Zoser

Autumn McGiveron as Mereb

Elizabeth Henderson as Nehebka

Colton Ball as Pharaoh

Garrett Tageant as Amonsaro

Megan West, Analei Holt, Elizabeth Henderson and Naomi Wolfenberger as the Amneris’ Ladies

Erin Kuhn, Nora Coffelt and Maggie Vincent as the Banquet Dancers

Michael Fagerstedt, Ryan Urvina, Colton Ball, Garrett Tageant, Gordon Shaw, Adam Nino and Collin Nicholson as Soldiers/Ministers

Naomi Wolfenberger, Megan West, Analei Holt, Erin Kuhn, Nora Coffelt, Maggie Vincent, Mairead Ost, Alex Scott, Emily Cushing, Emily May, Rachel Wiechelman, Olivia Nicholson, Brittany Bush, Hannah Palmer and Laura Galls as Nubian Women

Aida is the story of two young people whose imaginations bring a museum painting to life, revealing an ancient love story. It was first performed in 1871. It is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Antonio Ghislanzoni, based on a scenario often attributed to French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette.

Elton John and Tim Rice’s Aida the Musical premiered on Broadway on March 23, 2000, and ran for 1,852 performances until September 5, 2004, and is one of the longest-running Broadway musicals.

The original Aida was first performed in 1871. It was an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Antonio Ghislanzoni, based on a scenario often attributed to French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette. It’s the story of two young people whose imaginations bring a museum painting to life, revealing an ancient love story.

Aida  won four Tony Awards, including Best Musical Score and Best Performance by a Leading Actress. The original Broadway cast recording also won  the Grammy Award for Best Musical Show Album and the song “Written in the Stars,” recorded and sung by Elton John and LeAnn Rimes, reached No.2 on the Billboard in the U.S. music charts, and No.1 in Canada.

The cast is under the direction of Tamara Helland and music director J.R. Lakey.

Sponsors include the Aberdeen Rotary Club. For more information, contact Aberdeen High School at (360) 538-2040.

Invenergy completes purchase of 620 Megawatt power plant in Grays Harbor

Invenergy Development Company, LLC announced the successful refinancing of its 620 MW Grays Harbor Energy Center (“Grays Harbor”), a natural gas-fueled power generation project in Elma, Washington.

The plant began commercial operations in 2008, approximately thirty miles west of Olympia, in Grays Harbor County. The facility consists of two gas-fired GE Frame 7FA combustion turbines and one GE steam turbine generator operating in combined-cycle mode with duct firing.

GE Energy Financial Services – through GE Capital Markets, Inc. acted as Book Runner and Joint Lead Arranger for the transaction. CoBank also served as Joint Lead Arranger. In addition, BNP Paribas and Union Bank are providing financing in connection with this transaction.

Invenergy Development Company LLC is a joint venture between Invenergy Thermal LLC, an affiliate of Invenergy LLC (“Invenergy”), and Stark Investments, a global alternative investment firm.

About Invenergy  – www.InvenergyLLC.com

Invenergy and its affiliated companies develop, own and operate large-scale renewable and other clean energy generation facilities in North America and Europe. Invenergy (invenergyllc.com) is committed to clean power alternatives and continued innovation in electricity generation. Invenergy’s home office is located in Chicago and it has regional development offices throughout the United States and in Canada, Mexico, Japan, and Europe.

Invenergy and its affiliated companies have developed more than 8,000 MW of clean energy projects that are in operation, in construction, or under contract, including 65 wind, solar, and natural gas power facilities.

Quinault Indian Nation urges opposition to oil transport and shipment through Grays Harbor

The Quinault Indian Nation (QIN) is adamantly opposed to increased oil train traffic in Grays Harbor County, the construction of new oil terminals, increased oil shipping from the port of Grays Harbor and dredging of the Chehalis River estuary. “We oppose all of these for both economic and environmental reasons,” said Fawn Sharp, QIN President. “We ask the citizens, businesses and agencies from within the county and beyond to stand with us in opposing the intrusion of Big Oil into our region,” she said. “The small number of jobs this dirty industry brings with it are vastly outnumbered by the number of jobs connected with a healthy natural resources and a clean environment,” she said.

Fawn Sharp Quinault Indian Nation President“It is time for people from all walks of life to stand up for their quality of life, their children and their grandchildren. It makes no sense whatsoever to allow Big Oil to invade our region, especially with the volume they are proposing. We all have too much at stake to place ourselves square in the path of this onrushing deluge of pollution, to allow mile-long trains to divide our communities and jeopardize our air, land and waters,” she said.

“Consider the number of jobs that are dependent on health fish and wildlife. The birdlife in Grays Harbor alone attracts thousands of tourists every year. Fishing and clamming attract thousands more. And anyone who listens to Big Oil or their pawns when they tell us how safe the oil trains are, or the ships or even the oil terminals that are being proposed needs to pay closer attention. We have already had large quantities of fish and shellfish stolen from us through development of and damage to Grays Harbor and its tributaries and we are not accepting any more losses. We want restoration, not further damage,” she said.

“Derailments, crashes, spills and explosions are extremely dangerous and they happen with frightening regularity. The fact is that there will be accidents and there will be spills, and they will do extensive damage,” said Sharp.

Sharp said there is another fact of which people must be aware: “If we stand together, speak up and demand to be heard, we can make a difference. Our collective voice empowers us.”

U.S. Development Group is currently seeking permits to build an oil terminal on the Washington coast that could handle about 45,000 barrels of crude oil a day. The $80 million proposal at the Port of Grays Harbor is one of several in Washington that together would bring millions of barrels of oil by train from the Bakken region of North Dakota and Montana. About 17 million barrels of oil were shipped across Washington State last. That number is expected to triple this year. Grays Harbor is facing three separate crude-by-rail proposals. Westway Terminal Company, Imperium Terminal Services, and U.S. Development Group have each proposed projects that would ship tens of millions of barrels of crude oil through Grays Harbor each year. Daily trains more than a mile long would bring crude oil from North Dakota or tar sands crude oil from Alberta, Canada along the Chehalis River and into the port, where it would be stored in huge shoreline tanks. The crude would then be pumped onto oil tankers and barges, increasing at least four-fold the large vessel traffic in and out of the harbor.

Westway Terminal Company proposes five new storage tanks of 200,000 barrels each. Westway estimates it will receive 1.25 unit trains per day or 458 trains trips (loaded and unloaded) a year. The company estimates it will add 198-238 oil barge transits of Grays Harbor per year. “The chances are even those counts are very conservative,” said Sharp.

Imperium Terminal Services proposes nine new storage tanks of 80,000 barrels each. With a capacity to receive 78,000 barrels per day, Imperium may ship almost 28.5 million barrels of crude oil per year. Imperium estimates that the terminal would add 730 train trips annually, equaling two, 105-car trains (one loaded with oil on the way in, one empty on the way out) per day. The company estimates 400 ship/barge transits through Grays Harbor per year.

U.S. Development Group submitted its application in this crude-by-rail race early this month. It proposes eight storage tanks each capable of holding over 123,000 barrels of crude oil. The company anticipates receiving one loaded 120 tank car train every two days, and adding 90-120 Panamax-sized vessel transits through Grays Harbor per year.

“We are targeted by Big Oil,” said Sharp. “We will not allow them to turn our region into the greasy mess they have created in other regions. We care about our land and our water. We realize how important our natural resources are to our future and we’re not going to sit by and let them destroy what we have,” said Sharp.

Deborah Hersman, outgoing chair of the National Transportation Safety Board said on April 21 that U.S. communities are not prepared to respond to worst-case accidents involving trains carrying crude oil and ethanol. In her farewell address in Washington DC, she said regulators are behind the curve in addressing the transport of hazardous liquids by rail and that Federal regulations have not been revised to address the 440 percent increase in rail transport of crude oil and other flammables we have experienced since 2005. Hersman, who is leaving her post at NTSB April 25 to serve as president of the National Safety Council, said the petroleum industry and first responders don’t have provisions in place to address a worst-case scenario event involving a train carrying crude oil or ethanol.

Hershman added in her comments that the DOT-111 rail tank cars used to carry crude oil are not safe to carry hazardous liquids. She also said that NTSB is overwhelmed by the number of oil train accidents. At present, she said the NTSB is involved in more than 20 rail accident investigations but only has about 10 rail investigators.

“It makes absolutely no sense for us to allow our communities to be exposed to the same dangers that killed 47 people in Quebec this past summer. That tragedy was not an isolated incident. It could happen here, and there is absolutely no doubt that this increased oil traffic will cost us all in terms of both environmental and long term economic damage,” said Sharp.

“For the sake of our public safety, our long term economy, our streams, wetlands, fishing areas, shellfish beds, and migratory bird habitats, we will stand up to them. The Quinault Nation encourages everyone who cares about the future of our region to participate in the public hearings regarding the Westway and Imperium proposals being conducted at 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., Thursday, April 24 at Hoquiam High School and Tuesday, April 29 at Centralia High School. We further encourage letters and calls to the Department of Ecology, to local government and to the Governor. Now is the time for to speak out in support of the future of Grays Harbor and the Pacific Northwest!”

“We strongly encourage people to show up and make comments and submit written testimony at these hearings,” said Sharp. “A good turnout is a must,” she said. Following the hearing, written comments can be sent to Maia Bellon, Director of the Department of Ecology, at 300 Desmond Drive, Lacey, WA 98503-1274.

To join QIN in this effort, please email ProtectOurFuture@Quinault.org. “Together, we can protect the land and the water for our children, and rebuild a sustainable economy,” said Sharp.

DNR says groundbreaking research could save Washington Douglas fir

OLYMPIA – The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced the publication of an important new scientific report on root rot diseases in Douglas fir trees by a Study Committee of the Washington State Academy of Sciences. DNR requested the report to better understand and address root rot diseases that threaten Douglas fir, which are a vital economic and ecological resource in Washington.

 

The commercial harvest of Douglas fir on DNR-managed, state-owned public land in the 2011-2013 biennium accounted for  an estimated 800 million board feet of harvested timber and $250 million in non-tax revenue for DNR’s trust beneficiaries, which include public schools and universities.

 

“We thank the Washington Academy of Sciences and the esteemed scientists working under its auspices for completing this groundbreaking report,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “With the leadership of Study Committee Chair Dr. R. James Cook of Washington State University, they have produced an important road map to guide scientific inquiry and the response to tree parasites and disease that threaten the ecological health of Washington’s forests and the economic vitality of the communities that rely upon them.”

 

The Study Committee’s report, entitled Opportunities for Addressing Laminated Root Rot Caused by Phellinus Sulphurascens in Washington’s Forests, recommends consideration of several approaches to manage laminated root rot. The Committee also stressed the need for further molecular biology research, noting that a robust understanding of the full life cycle of tree-root pathogens and their host interactions can lead to innovative ways to exploit deviations in disease infection and tree mortality.

 

“The importance of molecular research on tree-root pathogens to our state and region cannot be overstated, and we urge research universities to devote resources and expertise to developing this emerging area of study,” said Dr. Cook. “I look forward to continued work with DNR on this issue, and I am pleased that the agency is under the effective leadership of Commissioner Goldmark, himself a molecular biologist with a keen interest in cutting-edge research.”

 

A copy of the report is available at the Academy website: http://www.washacad.org/initiatives/files/WSAS_Laminated_Root_Rot_%202013.pdf.

 

Washington State Academy of Sciences Study Committee

Members of the Study Committee include: R. James Cook, Chair, University of Washington; Robert L. Edmonds, University of Washington; Ned. B. Klopfenstein, USDA Forest Service; Willis Littke, Weyerhaeuser Company; Geral McDonald, USDA Forest Service; Daniel Omdal, DNR; Karen Ripley, DNR; Charles G. “Terry” Shaw, New Zealand and US Forest Services; Rona Sturrock, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Pacific Forestry Centre; and Paul Zambino, USDA Forest Service.

 

Commissioner Goldmark would like to thank all of the Study Committee members and their collaborators on behalf of the citizens of Washington.

 

About the Washington State Academy of Sciences

The Washington State Academy of Sciences provides expert scientific and engineering analysis to inform public policy-making, and works to increase the role and visibility of science in the State of Washington. Learn more at: http://www.washacad.org.

WDFW seeks comments on revised draft policy for Grays Harbor fisheries

OLYMPIA – The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is seeking public comments on a revised draft policy to improve salmon management in Grays Harbor.

The revised draft policy includes new provisions recently proposed by the commission to conserve wild salmon runs, clarify catch allocation, and reduce conflicts between sport and commercial fishers in the harbor.

The commission, a citizen panel that sets policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), added the new provisions during a public meeting attended by more than 150 fishers Jan. 10-11 in Tumwater.

Ron Warren, deputy assistant director of WDFW’s Fish Program, thanked the commission for adding provisions he said would provide the department with clear direction for setting future seasons for non-tribal salmon fisheries in Grays Harbor.

“We need to focus on conserving and restoring the salmon runs in the Grays Harbor Basin,” Warren said.

The revised policy, scheduled for a vote by the commission at a meeting Feb. 7-8, is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/fisheries/grays_harbor_salmon/ .

Written comments on the revised draft policy may be submitted through Jan. 31 via email to commission@dfw.wa.gov or by mail to the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA 98501-1091.

Commissioner Rolland Schmitten, who spoke in favor of the amendments, noted that fisheries in southeast Alaska and Canada intercept nearly half of all fall chinook salmon returning to the Chehalis River, which flows into Grays Harbor.

“Our challenge is that there are simply not enough salmon to meet the expectations of all stakeholders,” Schmitten said.

In other business, the commission modified fishing rules for two rivers on opposite sides of the Cascade Range:

  • Naselle River:   Fishing from a floating device equipped with an internal combustion motor was prohibited year round from the Highway 4 Bridge upstream to the Crown mainline (Salme) Bridge. The commission’s action was based on a citizens’ petition.
  • San Poil River:   The daily limit for walleye was raised from eight fish to 16 fish to address an overpopulation of walleye in this tributary to Lake Roosevelt.

Aida, the Musical at AHS, the High School

Casting for the musical “Aida, the Musical” to be performed at Aberdeen High School has been announced. Under the direction of Tamara Helland, there will be two evening performances and two matinees when the curtains lift May 1st through the 4th.

The play features hit songs by Elton John and Tim Rice. The cast includes:

Keola Holt as Aida

Kyle Brewer as Radames

Libby Carrico as Amneris

Justin Greco as Zoser

Autumn McGiveron as Mereb

Elizabeth Henderson as Nehebka

Colton Ball as Pharaoh

Garrett Tageant as Amonsaro

Megan West, Analei Holt, Elizabeth Henderson and Naomi Wolfenberger as the Amneris’ Ladies

Erin Kuhn, Nora Coffelt and Maggie Vincent as the Banquet Dancers

Michael Fagerstedt, Ryan Urvina, Colton Ball, Garrett Tageant, Gordon Shaw, Adam Nino and Collin Nicholson as Soldiers/Ministers

Naomi Wolfenberger, Megan West, Analei Holt, Erin Kuhn, Nora Coffelt, Maggie Vincent, Mairead Ost, Alex Scott, Emily Cushing, Emily May, Rachel Wiechelman, Olivia Nicholson, Brittany Bush, Hannah Palmer and Laura Galls as Nubian Women

The original Aida is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Antonio Ghislanzoni, based on a scenario often attributed to French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette.  It was first performed in 1871. It’s the story of two young people whose imaginations bring a museum painting to life, revealing an ancient love story.

Elton John and Tim Rice’s Aida the Musical premiered on Broadway on March 23, 2000, and ran for 1,852 performances until September 5, 2004, and is one of the longest-running Broadway musicals.

Aida won four Tony Awards, including Best Musical Score and Best Performance by a Leading Actress. The original Broadway cast recording also won  the Grammy Award for Best Musical Show Album and the song “Written in the Stars,” recorded and sung by Elton John and LeAnn Rimes, reached No.2 on the Billboard in the U.S. music charts, and No.1 in Canada.

Stay tuned for more updates from Aberdeen High School as these talented students bring this award-winning musical to the local stage.