Japanese Earthquake & Tsunami Anniversary – The Impact Continues 3 Years Later

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged to boost rebuilding efforts as the country marked the third anniversary Tuesday of a devastating earthquake and tsunami that left nearly 19,000 people dead, destroyed coastal communities and triggered a nuclear crisis.

Tuesday March 11, 2014 marks the 3rd anniversary of the Japanese earthquake & tsunami. Today, Japan is still searching for answers on what to do with the evacuees and the climbing rates of suicide of those affected. Chuck Wallace with the Grays Harbor County Emergency Management Agency says this event COULD happen here. The impacts are unimaginable and ongoing. If the most prepared country in the world still suffers from the tsunami after 3 years, how much of an impact would it present to the U.S.?

Please read the following article from the Japan Times.

http://www.co.grays-harbor.wa.us/info/DEM/PressReleaseDetail.asp?RlseDate=3%2F10%2F2014

As survivors gather to pray for the souls of their relatives and friends at memorial services, some communities have chosen to commemorate the event in advance to avoid the media attention. – Kyodo, Staff Report       March 10, 2014

Japanese Tsunami, 3 Years later
Photo courtesy ABC News, Video available at link

 

Grease fire escalates, displaces family of 6 in Aberdeen

Firefighters were called to a house fire in the 1000 block of Marion street in Aberdeen Sunday afternoon. Battalion Chief Bill Mayne said a grease fire escalated quickly on the stovetop around 1:30 Sunday. The family of 2 adults and 4 children evacuated and reported no injuries, but were also displaced by the fire. Mayne estimated damages at over $70-thousand, and said the American Red Cross is assisting the family.
Mayne said when dealing with cooking oil fires use another pan to smother it, or an ABC rated fire extinguisher once everyone else has evacuated.

Broadcasting pioneer Paul Harvey dies at age of 90

In 2005, Harvey was one of 14 notables chosen as recipients of the presidential Medal of Freedom. He also was an inductee in the Radio Hall of Fame, as was Lynne.

Former President George W. Bush remembered Harvey as a “friendly and familiar voice in the lives of millions of Americans.”

“His commentary entertained, enlightened, and informed,” Bush said in a statement. “Laura and I are pleased to have known this fine man, and our thoughts and prayers are with his family.”

Harvey composed his twice-daily news commentaries from a downtown Chicago office near Lake Michigan.

Rising at 3:30 each morning, he ate a bowl of oatmeal, then combed the news wires and spoke with editors across the country in search of succinct tales of American life for his program.

At the peak of his career, Harvey reached more than 24 million listeners on more than 1,200 radio stations and charged $30,000 to give a speech. His syndicated column was carried by 300 newspapers.

His fans identified with his plainspoken political commentary, but critics called him an out-of-touch conservative. He was an early supporter of the late Sen. Joseph McCarthy and a longtime backer of the Vietnam War.

Perhaps Harvey’s most famous broadcast came in 1970, when he abandoned that stance, announcing his opposition to President Nixon’s expansion of the war and urging him to get out completely.

“Mr. President, I love you … but you’re wrong,” Harvey said, shocking his faithful listeners and drawing a barrage of letters and phone calls, including one from the White House.

In 1976, Harvey began broadcasting his anecdotal descriptions of the lives of famous people. “The Rest of the Story” started chronologically, with the person’s identity revealed at the end. The stories were an attempt to capture “the heartbeats behind the headlines.” Much of the research and writing was done by his son, Paul Jr.

Harvey also blended news with advertising, a line he said he crossed only for products he trusted.

In 2000, at age 82, he signed a new 10-year contract with ABC Radio Networks.

Harvey was born Paul Harvey Aurandt in Tulsa, Okla. His father, a police officer, was killed when he was a toddler. A high school teacher took note of his distinctive voice and launched him on a broadcast career.

While working at St. Louis radio station KXOK, he met Washington University graduate student Lynne Cooper. He proposed on their first date (she said “no”) and always called her “Angel.” They were married in 1940 and had a son, Paul Jr.

They worked closely together on his shows, and he often credited his success to her influence. She was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 1997, seven years after her husband was. She died in May 2008.