Two Fishermen and Fish Company Manager Face Thousands in Fines for Fishing Violations

In 2005, there were limits on the weekly and monthly catch of groundfish per boat. SCHULTZ admitted in his plea agreement that he failed to accurately record more than 13,500 pounds of sablefish that his company had purchased. The company, Bell Buoy, reached a civil settlement of the case in March 2009, paying state and federal agencies more than $60,000 for its failure to accurately report the loads. The settlement amount was split between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with each entity receiving $31,576.

 
            ROBERT GREENFIELD admitted in his plea agreement that between May and August 2005, he exceeded the amount of sablefish he was allowed to take by more than 5,100 pounds. ROBERT GREENFIELD operates the F/V Remembrance, and failed to pay attention to the fish tickets from Bell Buoy that indicated he was exceeding his limit. KENNETH GREENFIELD operates the F/V Garda Marie and the F/V Renee Maria. KENNETH GREENFIELD admitted in his plea agreement that between May and August 2005, he exceeded his catch limit for sablefish by more than 8,200 pounds. KENNETH GREENFIELD admitted he failed to take reasonable care to monitor his catch and limits.
 
            In sentencing the men, Magistrate Judge Karen Strombom noted that, “These regulations are intended to protect our fisheries. Those who circumvent these regulations and are caught will end up in federal court.”
 
 

 

            The case was a joint investigation by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).
 
            The case was a long-term, joint investigation by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Program (WDFW). Both agencies often partner to aggressively pursue violations of laws meant to protect the Nations marine resources. Coastal economies and local commercial fishermen rely on the sustainability of these important fisheries resources. According to Mike Cenci, WDFW Deputy Chief, “illegal activities such as these disadvantage both.”
 
            The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Carl Blackstone.