High School Graduation Rates Soar for College Bound Scholarship Program Students

Higher education affordability is one of five key educational challenge areas in the Council’s anticipated 10-year educational Roadmap for the state (to be delivered to the Legislature by December 1).
Washington’s 2012 high school graduates included more than 10,000 of the state’s first College Bound Scholarship Program seniors, representing over 17 percent of the state’s entire graduating class. 
Established by the Legislature in 2007, the College Bound Scholarship Program offers financial aid for students meeting eligibility requirements. For example, students must have a household income at or below 65 percent of the state’s median family income and must earn satisfactory grades in high school. 
The Washington Student Achievement Council has worked collaboratively with the K-12 system, state agencies, non-profit organizations, and college access groups to enroll eligible students. To date, nearly 134,000 students have submitted complete College Bound applications.

About the Washington Student Achievement Council: Established as a new cabinet-level state agency on July 1, 2012, the Washington Student Achievement Council provides strategic planning, oversight, and advocacy to support increased student success and higher levels of educational attainment in Washington. The Council proposes improvements and innovations needed to adapt the state’s educational institutions to evolving needs and advocates for increased financial support and civic commitment for public education in recognition of the economic, social, and civic benefits it provides.
The nine-member Council includes five citizens, a current student, and one representative from each of the state’s four major educational sectors.
More information about the Council can be found on our website: wsac.wa.gov

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