Road Closures and Landslide Warning Signs

MONTESANO, Wash. – The Grays Harbor County Emergency Management Agency verifies road conditions prior to listing them as “reopened” so please be aware that this list may be updated/outdated at any time. Do NOT drive through water over a roadway.

 

To view a complete list of roads closed in Grays Harbor County, please visit:

http://www.co.grays-harbor.wa.us/info/DEM/RoadClosures.asp

 

 

Landslide Warning Signs  (from the USGS)

  • Springs, seeps, or saturated ground in areas that have not typically been wet before.
  • New cracks or unusual bulges in the ground, street pavements or sidewalks.
  • Soil moving away from foundations.
  • Ancillary structures such as decks and patios tilting and/or moving relative to the main house.
  • Tilting or cracking of concrete floors and foundations.
  • Broken water lines and other underground utilities.
  • Leaning telephone poles, trees, retaining walls or fences.
  • Offset fence lines.
  • Sunken or down-dropped road beds.
  • Rapid increase in creek water levels, possibly accompanied by increased turbidity (soil content).
  • Sudden decrease in creek water levels though rain is still falling or just recently stopped.
  • Sticking doors and windows, and visible open spaces indicating jambs and frames out of plumb.
  • A faint rumbling sound that increases in volume is noticeable as the landslide nears.
  • Unusual sounds, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together, might indicate moving debris.

Areas that are generally prone to landslide hazards

  • On existing old landslides.
  • On or at the base of slopes.
  • In or at the base of minor drainage hollows.
  • At the base or top of an old fill slope.
  • At the base or top of a steep cut slope.
  • Developed hillsides where leach field septic systems are used.

Areas that are typically considered safe from landslides

  • On hard, non-jointed bedrock that has not moved in the past.
  • On relatively flat-lying areas away from sudden changes in slope angle.
  • At the top or along the nose of ridges, set back from the tops of slopes.

Landslide Warning Signs  (from the USGS)

·         Springs, seeps, or saturated ground in areas that have not typically been wet before.

·         New cracks or unusual bulges in the ground, street pavements or sidewalks.

·         Soil moving away from foundations.

·         Ancillary structures such as decks and patios tilting and/or moving relative to the main house.

·         Tilting or cracking of concrete floors and foundations.

·         Broken water lines and other underground utilities.

·         Leaning telephone poles, trees, retaining walls or fences.

·         Offset fence lines.

·         Sunken or down-dropped road beds.

·         Rapid increase in creek water levels, possibly accompanied by increased turbidity (soil content).

·         Sudden decrease in creek water levels though rain is still falling or just recently stopped.

·         Sticking doors and windows, and visible open spaces indicating jambs and frames out of plumb.

·         A faint rumbling sound that increases in volume is noticeable as the landslide nears.

·         Unusual sounds, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together, might indicate moving debris.

Areas that are generally prone to landslide hazards

·         On existing old landslides.

·         On or at the base of slopes.

·         In or at the base of minor drainage hollows.

·         At the base or top of an old fill slope.

·         At the base or top of a steep cut slope.

·         Developed hillsides where leach field septic systems are used.

Areas that are typically considered safe from landslides

·         On hard, non-jointed bedrock that has not moved in the past.

·         On relatively flat-lying areas away from sudden changes in slope angle.

·         At the top or along the nose of ridges, set back from the tops of slopes.