Grays Harbor County Emergency Management Agency Warns: Very Strong Storm System Approaching Quickly

The National Weather Service in Seattle has indicated a powerful storm is approaching and will affect the region Saturday afternoon into Sunday. The system brings significant wind, rain and potential coastal flood issues. Power outages of significant duration could affect numerous areas throughout the county during this storm. n

Residents are urged to prepare for this Storm immediately.  Grays Harbor County Emergency Management and county public safety agencies are recommending residents to stay home and not go out unless they absolutely have to. Residents are urged to make sure they have adequate supplies for possible power outages; this includes drinking water and food on hand.

HUNTING ALERT

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Grays Harbor County Emergency Management and the Sheriff’s Department are urging hunters stay at home during these storm events. We have been cautioned by the National Weather Service in Seattle that the wind event Saturday will be very significant. High winds will make the forests extremely dangerous for hunters. Trees have full canopies and strong winds could create numerous broken branches and fallen trees making the environment for hunting very dangerous.

SATURDAY STORM

This storm is projected to arrive Saturday around noon and last through early Sunday morning. The storm will arrive in two stages. The first will begin between noon and 2 pm today with a quick blast of winds and rain then decrease. Once the storm passes along the coast (3:00 – 4:00 pm) we will be impacted by very strong, West winds right off the Pacific Ocean. SIGNIFICANT WINDS, 40-45 MPH, GUSTING TO 65-75 MPH ARE LIKELY – ESPECIALLY NEAR THE COAST. THE STRONGEST WINDS ARE FORECAST TO PEAK SATURDAY AFTERNOON @ 3-4:00 PM THROUGH 9-10:00 PM. All coastal areas will be subject to minor salt water coastal flooding. At this time all area rivers are rising but are not forecast to flood.

SEAS WILL GROW TO 15-20 FEET during this storm event, making area beaches, piers and jetties very hazardous due to high wave run up, beach erosion and the possibility of frequent sneaker waves.

The National Weather Service in Seattle has issued a HIGH WIND WARNING for the Central Coast, (Grays Harbor County), from noon, Saturday through 11:00 pm Saturday night, with sustained winds forecast along the coast to be 40-45 mph, gusting 65-75 mph.

CLAM DIG ALERT

Grays Harbor Emergency Management urges extreme caution to anyone venturing along the beaches for any reason – especially while digging Clams. This weekend, most area beaches open to Clam Digging. These powerful storms will make beaches extremely hazardous with long wave run –up, potential for numerous sneaker waves, overtopping of piers and jetties and significant beach erosion. These Clam Digs will be at night, in darkness, increasing the hazardous conditions to anyone on the beaches. DO NOT TURN YOUR BACK TO THE SEA! 

POTENTIAL IMPACTS FORM THE STORMS

Be aware most trees have full canopies of leaves making these wind events very significant. Be alert for downed trees, tree limbs and power lines. Power outages of significant duration could affect numerous areas throughout the county during this storm. DO NOT attempt to move power lines or trim tree limbs tangled with power lines.

Be extremely alert while driving over the next few days, especially during periods of heavy rain. Rain may pool along edges of roadways and also reduce visibility significantly, creating hazardous driving conditions. 

DO NOT use portable generators indoors, near doors or windows. Learn the signs of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

CARBON MONIXIDE GAS IS ODORLESS AND TASTELESS AND CAN CAUSE DEATH TO ANYONE EXPOSED TO IT.

 

SIGNS AND SYMPTONS OF CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING MAY INCLUDE:

  1. Dull headache.
  2. Nausea or vomiting.
  3. Shortness of breath.
  4. Blurred vision.
  5. Loss of consciousness.

 

If you believe you or anyone in your family is experiencing these symptoms,

  1. Leave the property immediately
  2. Call 911

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