Hunters have until March 31 to apply for multiple-season permits

OLYMPIA – Deer and elk hunters have until March 31 to enter their name in a drawing for a 2014 multiple-season permit, which can greatly increase their opportunities for success in the field.

In mid-April, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will randomly draw names for 8,500 multiple-season deer permits and 1,000 multiple-season elk permits.

Winners of the drawing will be eligible to purchase a special tag allowing them to participate in archery, muzzleloader and modern firearm general hunting seasons for deer or elk in 2014. Winners who purchase the multiple-season elk tag by Aug. 31 can participate in general elk-hunting season in both eastern and western Washington.

Winners also may choose any weapon type when applying for a special permit to hunt deer or elk.

“This is a great opportunity for hunters to extend their hunting season this fall,” said Dave Ware, game manager for WDFW. “Rather than having to choose one hunting method over another, hunters drawn for a multiple-season permit who purchase the tag can participate in multiple seasons.”

Ware noted that the tags can be used only during general seasons and in game management units that are open during a modern firearm, muzzleloader, or archery general season. For example, winners may not hunt during the muzzleloader general season in an area that is not open for the muzzleloader general season.

Also, hunters can apply only once for each species and are limited to harvesting one deer or elk.

Hunters may purchase a multiple-season permit application at an authorized license dealer, listed at http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/ , or by calling (866) 246-9453. The permit application is $7.10 for residents and $110.50 for nonresidents.

A 2014 hunting license is not required to submit an application, but winners of the drawing must purchase one before they can purchase a multiple-season tag.

Hunting licenses and multiple-season tags can be purchased from local license dealers, on the Internet (http://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/ ) or by calling (866) 246-9453. Including transaction fees, multiple-season deer or elk tags cost $182.00 for residents and nonresidents in addition to the cost of an annual hunting license. For more information, visit WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/ , or call the licensing department at (360) 902-2464. 

Raymond adopts ordinance allowing All Terrain Vehicles on some streets

You can now drive your ATV on some streets in Raymond – as long as you have the proper paperwork. The city announced yesterday that they have approved ordinance 1823 which authorizes the use of Wheeled All-Terrain Vehicles on city streets within the city limits of Raymond with a number of requirements and restrictions. This ordinance will take effect on February 24, 2014.

ATV’s/ORV’s must have a vehicle inspection form (Wheeled All-Terrain Vehicle Declaration) completed by an authorized ATV/ORV Dealer or repair shop.

The City of Raymond has three qualified repair shops: NAPA, Steve’s Front End and AP Auto. After an inspection is completed the form must be kept with vehicle and registration at all times. In the future this form will be required to receive an ON-Road tab from DOL.

ATV’s/ORV’s must have required equipment to pass the vehicle inspection: Headlight(s), Tail Light, Brake Light, Turn Signals (if riding after dark), Reflectors, Horn, Mirror(s), Brakes, Seat Belt (If an Utility Vehicle), Windshield (if applicable) and a Spark Arrester and Muffler. If your vehicle fails any one of the equipment requirements your vehicle is not approved for On-Road use.

Without the required inspection form, the ATV/ORV will be treated as an unauthorized vehicle. if you are stopped while riding on a city street you are subject to an infraction for OFF-Road vehicle on roadway.

Ordinance 1823 is ONLY approved for city streets that are 35 mph or less.

You MUST have a valid driver’s license (Direct Supervision is not allowed). Helmet is required. Insurance is not required.

Ordinance 1823 was created from the approval of House Bill 1632. ATV’s/ORV’s basically follow the Rules of the Road as a motorcycle.

The Raymond Police Department will be strictly enforcing Rules of the Road when dealing with ATV’s/ORV’s on city streets.

Nothing in this ordinance authorizes the use of ATV’s/ORV’s on Pacific County roads or city of South Bend streets.

http://raymondpolice.com/ordinance1823.pdf

Hoquiam council packed with public comment, as city moves forward with EIS

Concerned citizens packed the city council chambers in Hoquiam last night, most wearing red, all opposed to any action by the council on two efforts to export Crude by Rail from Grays Harbor.
As Judy Shirdal said “I am against Crude by Rail, and Crude oil storage in our community. If these projects pass, and are implemented, it could forever change the health and safety of our towns.”
The comments centered around hazards that crude-by-rail could bring, as Karoonuh Johnson said “Leadership has to accept that if we have a global economy, we also have a global environment.”
East County resident Radley Young added that the council’s actions affect so many more cities than just Hoquiam. “There are a tremendous amount of small communities that are bisected by the railroad, and they’ve been like that for a long time. But they’ve never had to deal with such a potential threat.”
As we reported earlier this month, City Administrator Brian Shay told Port of Grays Harbor Commissioners “With any luck 30 days from now we will be formally launching the EIS, and done 12 months from now.
City council last night adopted the report by staff recommending a consultant begin the Environmental Impact Statement process for Westway Terminals and Imperium Renewables, two companies that would like to expand export operations in Hoquiam.

Hoquiam Sergeant Jeff Salstrom receives life saving award

Hoquiam Police Sergeant Jeff Salstrom was honored last night, Chief Jeff Myers spoke before the city council meeting “The department is very proud today to present Sgt. Salstrom with the Life saving medal. This occurred back in October, Salstrom was first on the scene of what turned out to be a dog attacking three children in the backyard of a home on the East side of town.
In a story we brought you last October, Salstrom saved two children and their babysitter from the family dog, their babysitter recounted those tense moments “We were on the trampoline, the dog came up on the trampoline and I had to jump off and I fell and she fell and the dog started getting her and I just had to grab her and throw her into the shed, then I had to get the dog off of me.
Salstrom found the large mastiff type dog biting the head of an 8 year old boy, as a 15 year old babysitter, and a three year old girl were taking shelter in an open shed in the yard.
Chief Myers added last night “I am proud to award the life saving medal award in recognition of Sgt. Salstrom’s actions and I would indicate here that he demonstrated exactly the decisive action and bravery that we expect, recognize, and appreciate here at the Hoquiam Police Department.

Grays Harbor PUD warns customers to beware of phone scam

ABERDEEN – The Grays Harbor Public Utility District is warning customers to be aware of a phone scam in which callers are posing as PUD employees and demanding payments on overdue accounts.

 

PUD Customer Service Manager Randy Schmidt says the PUD has received several reports from businesses and individuals who have received calls from people claiming to be employees of the PUD and threatening to shut off a customer’s power if they do not immediately pay a certain amount of money.

 

“Customers need to beware of scams like this,” said Schmidt.  “If you receive a call demanding immediate payment, we urge you to immediately contact PUD staff to verify that the call was genuine.  Under no circumstances should you make a payment of any kind to callers without first checking to see that they are legitimate representatives of the PUD who can verify your account information and exact amount owing, both current and past due.”

 

Law enforcement agencies say their offices have received similar reports of callers claiming to represent television and phone providers, public utilities and magazine companies, demanding immediate payment.  Other scams include forged bills and parking tickets left on cars and in mail boxes.  Recipients of such fraudulent calls and mailings are advised to first contact company officials to verify the claim and to contact the office of your local law enforcement agency.

Emerson Manor evacuated due to high bacteria levels

The Emerson Manor in Hoquiam was evacuated yesterday, over 60 tenants were told yesterday afternoon that they needed to collect their valuables as they were moved to the Immanuel Baptist Church in Hoquiam for the evening.

As a result of the Thursday morning fire and extensive water damage in the Emerson Manor Apartments in Hoquiam, sample bacteria reports from runoff water returned today have been found to be excessively high, resulting in an evacuation of all 60+ tenants of the apartment building. Tenants were notified in a 4pm meeting Monday afternoon of the need to collect their valuables and necessary clothing to be transferred to the Immanuel Baptist Church in Hoquiam for the evening. Many tenants have also been separated from their pets which are being distributed to local area animal shelters and adoption homes until better living facilities can be arranged and they can be reunified with their owners.

The Department of Social & Health Services (DSHS), the Red Cross, Grays Harbor Community Hospital, Grays Harbor County Public Health and numerous local and regional agencies have been working tirelessly on this incident. Their efforts today were enormous, however it was the extreme cooperation of the Emerson Manor Apartment tenants who helped achieve the evacuation in less than 3 hours. The focus in the coming days is to find better, longer term living arrangements for all of the tenants.

The Emerson Manor tenants are mainly low income, senior citizen residents. Many have specific disabilities, yet they work hard to remain self-sufficient. Today, they had to leave their home, most of their personal belongings and furniture for an extended period of time. Some are lucky enough to have family and friends to assist and stay with during the building rehabilitation, but most have nowhere else to turn. They have left their home with literally the shirts on their back and little else.

The majority of tenants have no insurance covering them for this event. They have no assistance to help purchase new clothing, furniture and appliances lost due to the water damage. Anchor Bank, also displaced due to the fire, has graciously set up a fund to assist the residents of the Emersion Manor Apartments called the Emerson Manor Assistance Fund. Anchor Bank locations throughout Grays Harbor County will accept monetary donations for the displaced Emerson Manor Apartment tenants. Please, ONLY monetary donations will be accepted for this incident, because each tenant requiring assistance has specific needs. Anchor Bank has taken the lead. Let’s follow their example and help neighboring Harborites in need.

Razor clam dig approved, big bivalves await diggers on 4 coastal beaches

OLYMPIA – Plenty of fat clams await diggers who turn out for the next razor clam dig, set to run Feb. 26 through March 3 on various ocean beaches.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

As in previous openings, all digs are scheduled on evening tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said razor clams sampled in recent days are noticeably heavier than those tested earlier in the season. “With all the plankton in the water, the clams seem to be “fattening” up earlier than usual,” Ayres said. “Those clams will make for some tasty meals after the next opening.”

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • Feb. 26, Wednesday, 4:15 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Feb. 27, Thursday, 5:04 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • Feb. 28, Friday, 5:49 p.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 1, Saturday, 6:32 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • March 2, Sunday, 7:13 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • March 3, Monday, 7:53 p.m.; +0.3 feet; Twin Harbors
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

Ayres noted that the beaches open for the greatest number of days are those with the most clams still available for harvest.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2013-14 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

For updates on upcoming digs, see WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

FEMA prepares for Cascadia Subduction Zone 2016 Earthquake and Tsunami Exercise

Federal Emergency Management Agency staff, and emergency responders from around the state met in Ocean Shores last week to get the public involved in a major exercise planned for 2016.
Chuck Wallace with the Grays Harbor County Emergency Management Agency said on Thursday it’s all to prepare the public and private sectors for a mock 9.0 Earthquake in the Cascadia Subduction Zone, a major fault line that runs through the county.

The Cascadia subduction zone (also referred to as the Cascadia fault) is a subduction zone, a type of convergent plate boundary that stretches from northern Vancouver Island to northern California.
The Cascadia subduction zone (also referred to as the Cascadia fault) is a subduction zone, a type of convergent plate boundary that stretches from northern Vancouver Island to northern California.

“How prepared are you today, to handle this? What do you believe will happen once this occures? And what kind of help do you need to get back in service? Because if this happens to our county, this impacts everybody.
Wallace said besides a tsunami, a CSZ earthquake will take out infrastructure “You’re going to feel the ground shake, you’re going to rattle and roll for a couple of minutes. You’re going to have some liquefaction where the ground becomes unstable, maybe water comes up through the ground [where] you normally wouldn’t think of. There’s some subsidence where they believe that the coastal area is going to drop about 4 to 6 feet and that will go probably almost to the county line before it levels out again.

The Exercise is from some of the same FEMA Region 10 crew that brought us The Great Washington Shake Out – registration for which just opened online by the way. Expect to hear more in the coming years about the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) 2016 Earthquake and Tsunami Exercise.

Traffic delays expected in Central Park, WSDOT crews repairing median barrier

Motorists may encounter traffic delays on US 12 on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday while crews repair highway median barrier. From 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Washington State Department of Transportation maintenance crews will close the left lanes of both eastbound and westbound US 12 along a 1.5-mile segment of highway between Central Park and Montesano. Each day crews will move their operations, focusing efforts on median barrier located between mileposts 3 and 8.

Motorists are advised to expect slight delays and to add extra time to reach their destinations.

Mason County Sheriff’s Office North Precinct dedicated to former sheriff

On Saturday morning, February 22, 2014, over 200 people gathered at the new Sheriff’s Office North Precinct to attend the building dedication and ribbon cutting ceremonies where the new office was christened as The Sheriff Steve Whybark Public Safety Building.

WA State Lt Governor Brad Owens, Mason County resident and long time friend to both current Mason County Sheriff Casey Salisbury and former Mason County Sheriff Steve Whybark spoke words of praise for the many years of dedicated service that Sheriff Whybark provided as well as for the current leadership and vision of Sheriff Salisbury.

Mason County Commissioner District #1 Randy Neatherlin added to Lt Gov Owens thanks to Sheriff Salisbury and former Sheriff Whybark, by adding additional thanks to the men and women Deputies who serve the people of Mason County, and that having this new North Precinct is a long time vision now made a reality by Sheriff Salisbury.

Mason County Sheriff’s Office volunteer of fifteen years John Weichert provided a background on how former Sheriff Whybark began the dream of having a north end office in Belfair.

Mason County Sheriff Casey Salisbury thanked all those in attendance and recognized the citizens of Mason County for helping make his goal of a North Precinct come to fruition.

Former Mason County Sheriff Steve Whybark was joined by his wife Lori where he explained his vision of a Belfair substation when he was a patrol deputy, and then he thanked the hard work and dedication of all of the volunteers who made the office a reality. He also thanked his previous staff that had worked with him for his three terms as Sheriff.

The ceremony began with the presentation of the colors by the Mason County Sheriff’s Office Honor Guard, the pledge of allegiance and invocation by Chaplain George Albertson, and the recognition of the many dignitaries in attendance by Sheriff Salisbury.

A cement stand with a bronze plaque was unveiled by Sheriff Salisbury and former Sheriff Whybark, and then the honor of the ribbon cutting was given to former Sheriff Whybark.

For the ribbon cutting, the following dignitaries were asked to join Sheriff Salisbury and former Sheriff Whybark: Lt Gov Brad Owens, Commissioner Randy Neatherlin, Undersheriff James Barrett, Chief Deputy Ryan Spurling (the new North Precinct Chief), Chief Civil Deputy Jan Shepherd, Chief Admin Deputy Theresia Ehrich, Jail Chief Tom Haugen, and former Undersheriff Gary Crane.

Also in attendance for the North Precinct dedication were former Mason County Sheriff Bob Shepherd, Mason County Commissioner Terri Jeffreys, building owner Bill Byerly, Thurston County Sheriff Chief Deputy Brad Watkins, Kitsap County Undersheriff Dennis Bonneville and Kitsap County Sheriff Chief Deputy Gary Simpson.

After the ceremony, guided tours of the new North Precinct, tours of the static displays of different Sheriff’s Office equipment, meet and greet of different K-9’s, and a K-9 display were all provided to the attendees. There was also a free BBQ served to the public including hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, cookies, pop & water. This was done as a thank you to the public for supporting the Sheriff’s Office in order to have a North Precinct.

A special thanks was also given to the KMAS radio station for providing the PA system for the ceremony, as well covering the event on the air. The Mason County Journal and KIRO TV News were also recognized for providing news journalist that covered the ceremony in order to keep the citizens informed of this great event.