Archive for June 2011

State Patrol Recognizes Truck Drivers

The following are the award winners for the Inspector’s Championship.

Overall                                                                          
1st  Peter Sponburgh                                                    
2nd Dean Appell                                                           
3rd  Nolan Rice                                                            

Interview
1st  Peter Sponburgh
2nd Donald Knoop
3rd Nolan Rice

Written Exam
1st Scott McLaughlin (Snohomish County)
2nd Peter Sponburgh
3rd Fred Aebischer

Level 1 Inspection
1st  Dean Appell      
2nd Peter Sponburgh           
3rd Tiffany Grayless

Haz-Mat  
1st  Peter Sponburgh
2nd Nolan Rice
3rd  Dean Appell

Cargo Tank
1st  Steve Michael
2nd Jeff Winslow
3rd  Peter Sponburgh

Motor Coach
1st Nolan Rice  
2nd Marty Wolfe  
3rd Mark Littlefield  

In the 2011 Washington State Truck Driving Championship, the “Best of the Best” professional commercial truck drivers competed for the right to represent Washington State at the upcoming National Truck Driving Championships.  With 139 Registered competitors in the competition this year, it was a wonderful event for the drivers to showcase their excellent skills in driver & driving knowledge, vehicle safety inspection proficiency, and their ability to maneuver their ‘big rigs” through a challenging course of specific driving scenarios.

The top 3 competitors in nine different truck classes were recognized at the end of the day.  The complete lists, by truck class, are listed below.

Grand Champion  
Mark Peterson, USF

3 AXLE    
1st  Mark Peterson, USF
2nd Tim Davis, Peninsula Truck Lines
3rd  Andrey Grishchuk, Conway Trucking

4 AXLE    
1st Chris Bates, Washington Closure
2nd Mike Young, Peninsula Truck Lines
3rd Guru Gill, Safeway

5 AXLE    
1st John Enyeart, Safeway
2nd Gary Ackerson, Supervalu
3rd Shawn Keck, Fed Ex Freight

Flatbed    
1st Scott Henrickson, Conway Freight
2nd Jeffrey Maas, Boeing
3rd Robert Dean, Conway Freight

Sleeper
1st Roy Garcia, Peninsula Truck Lines
2nd Chuck Snowdon, Boeing
3rd Mike McConnaughey, Carlile Transportation

Straight    
1st John Hnatishin, Boeing
2nd Anthony Cornell, Conway Freight
3rd Lisa Bry, Boeing

Tanker        
1st Charles Price, Conway Freight
2nd Michael Howellm, Conway Freight
3rd Gary Nickell, Boeing

Twins        
1st Chris Poynor, Conway Freight
2nd Josh Jenkin, Peninsula Truck Lines
3rd Rick Colton, Boeing

Stepvan    
1st Robert Hinds, Fed Ex Ground
2nd Joshua Jack, Fed Ex Express
3rd Dayton Fedak,     Fed Ex Express

Pre Trip – Joshua Jack, Fed Ex Express
Harry Fletcher Award -  Mike McPherson, Conway Freight
Rookie – Jason VanMeter, YRC

CVSA recognizes the best of the best by inviting member jurisdictions throughout North America to participate in the North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC).  The 2011 Washington State Inspector Overall Champion and Truck Driving Grand Champion will have the opportunity to compete in the North American Inspector’s Championship from August 8-13, 2011, in Orlando, Florida.  The NAIC information can be found on the web at http://www.cvsa.org/programs/naic/aspx.

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WDFW Mandates Release of Tagged Salmon

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is conducting a fish-marking on chinook salmon and the Yakama Nation is marking sockeye salmon to study survival and migration patterns within the Columbia River system. Radio, temperature and acoustic tags will be attached to adult chinook and sockeye, which will be identified by a colored external floy (anchor) tag located near the dorsal fin. The success of these studies is dependent upon the angler’s ability to recognize these tags and to release the fish back into the river as quickly as possible. 


Action: Release all chinook and sockeye with external floy (anchor) tags attached.

 

Effective dates: July 1 through Oct 15, 2011.

 

Species affected: Chinook and sockeye salmon.

 

Location: Mainstem Columbia River from Priest Rapids Dam upstream to Hwy 17 Bridge in Bridgeport, including the Similkameen and Okanogan Rivers.

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Grays Harbor County Awarded Funding

Grants were awarded to projects in the following counties. See project details <http://www.rco.wa.gov/documents/press/2011/083-GrantLists.pdf>  

Asotin County……………………. $4,200,000

Benton County…………………… $3,064,342

Chelan County………………….. $4,398,255

Clallam County…………………….. $343,810

Clark County……………………… $1,633,878

Columbia County……………………. $30,844

Cowlitz County……………………… $479,000

Garfield County………………………. $40,000

Grant County………………………… $249,000

Grays Harbor County……………. $821,363

Island County…………………….. $1,305,122

Jefferson County……………….. $3,776,261

King County………………………. $5,917,863

Kitsap County…………………….. $3,399,642

Kittitas County……………………. $3,464,640

Klickitat County…………………….. $831,357

Lewis County………………………… $327,600

Mason County……………………. $1,736,495

Okanogan County………………… $820,050

Pacific County……………………. $4,130,000

Pend Oreille County……………… $100,000

Pierce County……………………. $6,498,829

San Juan County……………………. $47,525

Skagit County…………………….. $3,599,387

Snohomish County……………. $1,419,962

Spokane County………………… $3,959,564

Stevens County………………………. $26,500

Thurston County………………… $3,022,751

Wahkiakum County……………… $498,000

Walla Walla County………………… $96,000

Whatcom County……………….. $1,315,451

Whitman County…………………….. $96,000

Yakima County………………….. $2,663,449

Statewide…………………………… $1,085,000

Multiple Counties………………. $2,121,062

In all, the board received grant applications for more than 400 projects requesting about $200 million. The grants were reviewed and ranked during the past year. Panels of experts evaluated projects against dozens of different criteria, ranging from the need for a project, to its cost-effectiveness, to how well it was designed, to the level of demonstrated community support.

“The grants are competitive,” Chapman said. “There’s a tremendous need out there and we’re only able to fund about half of the projects requested each year. So the competitive process helps make sure we are funding only the best of the best projects.”

Grant recipients must provide their own matching funds, donated labor and other costs. Grant applicants are investing more than $48 million in matching resources, stretching the state’s limited dollars even further.

“It means the Legislature and local communities are making a significant contribution to ensuring Washington remains a great place for people, families and businesses,” Chapman said.

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BEACH Program Tests The Waters

      “Our partnerships with local health departments and volunteers are the strength of the BEACH Program,” said Julie Lowe, who manages the program. “These local partners collect weekly samples so we can test for fecal pollution and notify the public when we have problems.”
      
      BEACH uses its website, social network, email announcements and swimming advisory signs to provide immediate notification to the public when the risk of illness is increased.
      
      The program’s scientifically credible monitoring strategy involves weekly sampling from highly used beaches and immediate notification when bacteria levels do not meet human health standards.
      
      Lowe encourages people to look for posted signs at the beach or visit the BEACH Program website (www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/eap/beach/index.html), the best source of timely, accurate information about high use marine swimming beaches and our program.
      
      This year, the federally funded BEACH Program is monitoring about 70 of the state’s most popular saltwater beaches. That’s up from 52 beaches last year, thanks to additional funding for Puget Sound beaches from the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuary Program.
      
      The program targets popular beaches near potential sources of pollution. While the main goal is to monitor water quality and notify the public when bacteria levels are high, BEACH also works with local and state partners to investigate and correct the problems whenever possible.
      
      Learn more from BEACH by tapping in to the following links:
      
* Facebook: You can “Like” the program. (www.facebook.com/WABEACH )
      
* Blog: Read about the latest beach health postings on Ecology’s ECOconnect blog (http://ecologywa.blogspot.com/ ) by searching for “Fecal Matters.”

* Twitter: Read the latest BEACH tweets. (http://twitter.com/#!/ecologywa  and http://twitter.com/#!/WA_DeptofHealth )

* Email: Receive automatic email updates about beach health. (http://listserv.wa.gov/cgi-bin/wa?A0=BEACH )

* BEACH Program website. (www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/eap/beach/index.html )
      
      Do your part to keep beaches clean:
      
* Scoop and bag pet poop and throw it in the trash.
* Inspect and maintain your home septic system.
* Pump your recreational boat holding tank into an authorized pump station.
* Pick up all of your trash at the beach, especially diapers.
      
      Learn more about how you can help protect our waters at Ecology’s education website, Washington Waters – Ours to Protect (www.ecy.wa.gov/washington_waters/ )

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Are Your Fireworks Legal?

Legal Consequences:  There may be legal consequences for any injuries or damages caused by the irresponsible use of fireworks.  These consequences range from being charged with malicious mischief, assault or a gross misdemeanor.  Examples include possession of illegal explosive devices, such as fireworks that have been altered. 

  • Making an improvised explosive device is a gross misdemeanor.  A gross misdemeanor can bring a fine of up to $5,000 and/or one year in prison.
  • If property was damaged, it could be considered a property crime which is malicious mischief.
  • If used to blow up something, it could be considered a destructive device which is a felony.
  • If someone was hurt by the device, a person could be charged with bodily harm and assault, depending on intent.

Take Responsibility:  Personal fireworks require personal responsibility.

  • Be sure the fireworks you purchase are legal to possess and discharge.  Know the dates and times fireworks are allowed in your community.
  • Set family boundaries.  Talk with family members and guests about the fireworks laws for your area.  Laws restricting or banning the use of fireworks in cities and counties are listed on the fireworks website at http://www.wsp.wa.gov/fire/docs/fireworks/ordinances.pdf.
  • Stay away from illegal explosive devices such as M80’s and M100’s.  These items are not fireworks, they are illegal explosive devices. The damage they cause can be devastating and life altering.  

The Office of the State Fire Marshal is a Bureau of the Washington State Patrol, providing fire and life safety services to the citizens of Washington State including inspections of state licensed facilities, plan review of school construction projects, licensing of fire sprinkler contractors and pyrotechnic operators, training Washington State’s firefighters, and collecting emergency response data.

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Redistricting Washington Tools

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Redistricting meetings continue throughout the state, the commission involved has released a new tool for residents to draw their own boundary lines to accommodate a 10th Congressional District.
Communications Director Cathy Cochrane said changes this time around will be more dramatic than previously; “Things are going to change a lot more, we had %14 growth in the state population. So we have to make sure that everyone is equally represented.”
Visitors to redistricting.wa.gov can access the new mapping tool online, and review submitted proposals, those without internet access can ask the commission to send them paper maps to do the same.

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Seabrook Grabs Awards from California

SEABROOK, Wash. – A new local community was recently honored at the Pacific Coast Builders Conference in San Francisco. Seabrook founder Casey Roloff said the new beach town was selected from over 400 entries to receive Gold Nugget Awards for Residential Project of The Year, and Community Site Plan of 20 Acres or More.

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