Archive for August 2009

Wynoochee Shooting Being Investigated as Possible Act of Self Defense

GRAYS HARBOR COUNTY, Wash. – The Grays Harbor County Sheriff’s Department has identified the man fatally shot at Lake Wynooche as 25 year old Weston Wolff of Olympia. Grays Harbor County Under Sheriff Rick Scott says that based on collected evidence and statements, the incident appears to be an act of self defense.

Scott told KBKW News that the homicide investigation continues, however the County Prosecutors Office is not requesting an arrest at this point and that the department is not releasing information on the person of interest in the investigation "They are awaiting our completed investigation, before they make the legal determination as to to whether this was justifiable or not."

County deputies arrived on the scene around 2 o’clock Saturday morning, and investigated well into Saturday afternoon Scott said there are some details of the incident still under investigation, and that many details that led up to the shooting early Saturday morning will not be released until the Prosecutors office has made a ruling.

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Raymond Man Arrested for Possible DUI, Resisting Arrest, and Possession of Marijuana

MONTESANO, Wash. – A Raymond Man was arrested for Possible DUI and Possession of Marijuana Friday Afternoon after attempting to elude the arresting officer on Highway 12.

Washington State Patrol Trooper Stewart Intercepted the vehicle on State Route 107, failing to yield to the officer, 51 year old James Deward Melton turned Eastbound onto  Highway 12 in Montesano, striking the guardrail, then accelerated to a high rate of speed. The 1998 Lincoln Town car eventually pulled over, almost half way to Elma.

Melton was arrested for Driving Under the Influence and Resisting Arrest, two firearms and an undisclosed amount of marijuana were also recovered from the vehicle.

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Snake River Opens Sept. 1 for Fall Chinook Fishing

Anglers can expect some changes from last year’s fishery, which was the first Snake River fall chinook fishery in nearly 30 years, Mendel said. Those changes include expanding the open area and new regulations.

The hatchery chinook fishery will be open from the Highway 12 Bridge (near the mouth of the Snake River) upstream to the no-fishing zone below Ice Harbor Dam, and from the Highway 261 Bridge crossing on the Snake River (approximately one half mile upstream from Lyons Ferry Hatchery) upstream to the no-fishing zone below Little Goose Dam.

In most of the open area, the daily catch limit will be two hatchery adult chinook (24 inches or greater), and four chinook jacks (less than 24 inches) either wild or hatchery-marked. Hatchery fish can be identified by a clipped adipose fin and a healed scar.

One exception is along the "wall" and walkway area upstream from the juvenile fish bypass return pipe (below Little Goose Dam), where the daily limit will be one hatchery adult chinook and up to two chinook jacks, Mendel said. 

"Anglers must stop fishing for salmon once they retain the daily limit of adult hatchery salmon," he said. 

In addition, a night closure will be in effect for all species within the boundaries of the fishery, including steelhead. Retention of steelhead is traditionally allowed beginning Sept. 1. 

Coho salmon, adult wild chinook and wild steelhead must be immediately released unharmed. Anglers must use barbless hooks when fishing for chinook or steelhead in the Snake River. No chinook or steelhead can be removed from the water unless the fish is retained as part of the daily catch limit.

Other fishing rules on the Snake River can be found in WDFW’s Fishing in Washington pamphlet, available at license dealers and WDFW offices or at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fish/regs/fishregs.htm . Descriptions of fish species also can be found in the sportfishing rules pamphlet.

"It’s important for anglers to be able to identify their catch because wild chinook salmon, coho salmon and wild steelhead are in the Snake River during this fishery," Mendel said.  

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Coast Guard seizes Ecstasy near Canadian border

Picture of the 18-foot vessel

 

Picture of the duffle bag with MDMA inside

SEATTLE — A duffle bag containing 60,000 tablets of Ecstasy, worth approximately $720,000, was interdicted by a Coast Guard boarding team from Coast Guard Station Neah Bay, Wash., Thursday, Aug. 27, 2009.  The suspected smuggler was detained by the Coast Guard boarding team and later arrested by members of Coast Guard Investigative Service.  The suspect was subsequently transported to the Clallam County jail and the Ecstasy was transferred to the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office. The seizure was made in cooperation with Makah Tribal Enforcement. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

 

Photo of the MDMA next to the duffle bag while being checked into evidence 

SEATTLE — A Coast Guard boarding team from Coast Guard Station Neah Bay, Wash., interdicted an 18-foot boat carrying a duffle bag containing 60,000 tablets of Ecstasy, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2009.  The seized drugs are worth approximately $720,000. The suspected smuggler was detained by the Coast Guard boarding team and later arrested by members of Coast Guard Investigative Service.   The suspect was subsequently transported to the Clallam County jail and the Ecstasy was transferred to the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office. The seizure was made in cooperation with Makah Tribal Enforcement. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

 

Photo of the MDMA as it was being checked into evidence

SEATTLE — A Coast Guard boarding team from Coast Guard Station Neah Bay, Wash., interdicted an 18-foot boat carrying a duffle bag containing 60,000 tablets of Ecstasy, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2009.  The seized drugs are worth approximately $720,000. The suspected smuggler was detained by the Coast Guard boarding team and later arrested by members of Coast Guard Investigative Service.   The suspect was subsequently transported to the Clallam County jail and the Ecstasy was transferred to the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office. The seizure was made in cooperation with Makah Tribal Enforcement. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

 

 

 

 SEATTLE — The U.S. Coast Guard, in cooperation with Makah Tribal Enforcement, interdicted an 18-foot vessel Thursday and seized 60,000 tablets of Ecstasy, worth approximately $720,000, found aboard the vessel.

The Coast Guard Station Neah Bay, Wash., boat crew while on a patrol observed an 18-foot boat at about 6:30 p.m.,  headed south from the vicinity of the U.S. and Canadian border in the Straits of Juan De Fuca near Neah Bay

The Coast Guard boarded the vessel and found one duffle bag, the contents of which field-tested positive as Ecstasy.

The suspected smuggler aboard the 18-foot boat was detained by the Coast Guard boarding team and later arrested by members of the Coast Guard Investigative Service. The suspect was later transported to the Clallam County jail and the Ecstasy was transferred to the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office.

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Coast Guard Monitors Oil Spill Near Sunken Fishing Vessel

SEATTLE – The U.S. Coast Guard, Washington Department of Ecology and the Islands’ Oil Spill Association (IOSA) continue to monitor the area for oil spills where the fishing vessel Anna J capsized and sank about a half-mile south of Eagle Cove, San Juan Island, Friday evening.

The most recent fly-over at approximately noon Saturday did not note any sheen in the water. A two-mile long, light-colored sheen was reported during a flight earlier that morning. Small drops of diesel and other oil have been floating to the surface slowly. 

The agencies have assessed the beach and have found no spill impact. Hazardous debris from the vessel have been retrieved.

At this time, the agencies will continue to monitor the situation and had another over-flight planned for first light Sunday morning. Wave action, wind and sunlight are helping dissipate the oil drops naturally with minimal environmental impact.   

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Raymond Fire Department Receives FEMA Grant

An important component of the Administration’s larger, coordinated effort to strengthen the Nation’s overall level of preparedness, the AFG is designed to enhance response capabilities and to more effectively protect the health and safety of the public with respect to fire and other hazards. The grants enable local fire departments and emergency medical services organizations to purchase or receive training, conduct first responder health and safety programs, and buy equipment and response vehicles. 
These grant programs are administered cooperatively by two FEMA components: the Grant Programs Directorate and the United States Fire Administration. The full list of past and current recipients and other Assistance to Firefighter Grant program information is posted on the AFG website at (www.firegrantsupport.com).
FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.
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Westport to Receive Ecology Funds to Prevent Flood Damage

The cities and counties will use the money for various purposes such as acquiring flood-prone properties, install water-tight access lids to prevent stormwater infiltration into local sewer systems, and remove levees to improve flood protection and restore natural stream functions.

 

"The recent catastrophic floods we experienced in 2007 and earlier this year highlight how critical it is to get these funds out to our local communities," said Gordon White, who oversees Ecology’s statewide shoreline and environmental assistance activities.

Ecology is giving awards for the following local projects:

 

  • Yakima County – $220,000 to remove the Boise-Cascade levee and acquire the DelaPaz property which has suffered repeated flood damage.
  • Lewis County – $200,000 to elevate homes in the Chehalis River floodplain.
  • Skagit County – $200,000 to help pay for a flood-protection study for the Skagit basin.
  • Sultan (Snohomish County) – $150,000 to acquire and demolish homes and structures that have suffered repetitive flood damage.
  • Wilkeson (Pierce County) – $150,000 to restore and stabilize stream banks along Wilson Creek.
  • Westport (Grays Harbor County) – $125,000 for a system-wide flood damage prevention project.
  • Ellensburg (Kittitas County) – $80,000 to modify the Reecer Creek levee.
  • Pullman (Whitman County) – $75,000 to improve the channel for Missouri Flat Creek.
  • Connell (Franklin County) – $50,000 to clear sediment out of the Esquatzel-Coulee channel.
  • Orting (Pierce County) – $50,000 to prevent backflows from the outfalls draining to the Puyallup River.
  • Colville (Stevens County) – $25,000 to construct a stormwater retention facility at McDonald Park.
  • East Wenatchee (Douglas County) – $25,000 for a culvert enhancement project located at Canyon A and Eastmont Avenue.

In all, 38 communities submitted applications for 41 projects worth $18 million. Ecology, however, only had $1.35 million for state assistance.

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