Archive for KBKW News

Live, local, and late breaking news featured on KBKW

Passenger ejected from car wreck that sends two to hospital

Washington State Patrol

Two young men were injured yesterday when their 2007 Mazda 3 collided with a utility pole on the East Agate road and ejected the passenger. The Washington State Patrol reports a 22 year old Centralia man and his 21 year old passenger from Shelton were transported to Mason General Hospital just before 11 Thursday night. Trooper Salverson reports the passenger was not wearing a seat belt when their Northbound car left the road to the right and hit the pole.

‘Kilmer at your Kontinental Breakfast’ in Ocean Shores

Congressman Derek Kilmer

The City of Ocean Shores and the Ocean Shores/North Beach Chamber of Commerce are hosting a continental breakfast with Derek Kilmer @ the Home Port on Friday, August 29th at 8:30AM – 9:30AM — Hosts are providing Coffee-Tea-Cinnamon Rolls — Please join us.

Derek Kilmer will discuss our coastal erosion and climate change. There is a new effort by the Federal Government to help with the effects of climate change. He would like to hear concerns about coastal safety issues facing businesses. Suggestions on mitigation are welcome. He will outline some current plans and legislation.

Intermittent SR 12 closures scheduled for pole replacement work

Grays Harbor PUD

All lanes of State Route 12 east of Aberdeen at Baila Dip will be closed intermittently between 10pm on Thursday, Aug. 28th and 4am on Friday, Aug. 29th.  The closures are part of ongoing line maintenance and pole replacement work by Grays Harbor PUD line crews.

The intermittent closures will be between milepost 1.6 and milepost 2.07 and are expected to last 10 to 20 minutes each.  Drivers are advised to use alternate routes during the impacted time.  The closures will not impact Thursday evening or Friday morning commutes.

Registered Sex Offender Working For Carnival at Pacific County Fair Arrested

South Bend, WA. – This morning a registered sex offender identified as Jason A. Miner, age 38, and of Yakima was arrested by Pacific County Sheriff deputies at the Pacific County Jail. Miner was reporting to the Sheriff’s Office to register within our county as required by state law. Miner was in Pacific County working for the company contracting carnival rides and activities at the Pacific County Fair.

Miner was arrested on an outstanding felony warrant out of Yakima County for failing to register as a sex offender. Miner was booked into Pacific County Jail for the warrant. Bail is set at 10,000.00.

Community Foundation awards $128,900 in Discretionary Grants and $40,000 in After School Program Fund Grants

Grays Harbor Community Foundation

The Grays Harbor Community Foundation is pleased to be able to invest $128,900 into the community through its third quarter discretionary grants cycle. The Foundation has long been a resource to Grays Harbor County nonprofit organizations by offering a quarterly discretionary grants cycle. This quarter, the Foundation awarded 13 grants that totaled $128,900 in discretionary funding. “This is the largest discretionary grants cycle, in terms of number of applications, as well breadth of organizations requesting funding,” Program Officer Cassie Lentz said. “We were pleased to see the extensiveness of programs and projects that were seeking funding, from all corners of our county and beyond.”

The organizations that were funded through this discretionary grants cycle include: Montesano Community Outreach for summer art camps, Our Aberdeen for mural restorations, Grays Harbor College for making ballet performance accessible to children, Thurston County Volunteer Legal Services for legal advice clinics in Grays Harbor County, Nonprofit Leaders Conference of Southwest WA for their 2014 conference, Artic Community Association for roof repairs, Child Care Action Council for their “Raising A Reader” program, Aberdeen Revitalization Movement for phase one of their operations, Catholic Community Services for the Grays Harbor Youth Center, Beyond Survival for the “Where We Live” program, McCleary School District for STEAM education, Northwest Justice Project for an employment opportunities legal fellowship in Grays Harbor, and Montesano School District for the field turf project at Jack Rottle field.

The Grays Harbor Community Foundation was also able to award $40,000 to four After School Programs here on the Harbor through a designated fund set up specifically for that benefit. Supported programs included: McCleary School District, Montesano Community Outreach, North Beach School District, and the YMCA of Grays Harbor for Harbor After-School program sites in Hoquiam, Elma and McCleary.

Grays Harbor Community Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization with a mission “to improve the quality of life in the communities throughout Grays Harbor County.” This is accomplished through many projects and processes that work through or in support of other non-profit organizations, including a quarterly discretionary grants cycle with applications accepted on the first business day of January, April, July and October.

Tax deductible donations may be made to:
Grays Harbor Community Foundation, P.O. Box 615, Hoquiam, WA 98550
You may find out more by checking the foundation website: www.gh-cf.org or you may contact the Foundation staff at 532-1600 or by e-mail at: info@gh-cf.o[email protected]

Hoquiam’s new Chief of Police tours jail, pilots tug

Hoqiuam Police Chief Dylan Ellefson

On Monday, August 19, 2014, Hoquiam Police Department’s “Chief for a Day”, Dylan Ellefson, was sworn-in at City Hall by Mayor Jack Durney.
Chief Ellefson took the oath of office to include a promise to enjoy the time with his family and new law enforcement friends while representing the Hoquiam Police Department at “2014 Chief for a Day” at the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission this Thursday, August 21st.
In addition to a station tour, walk-through to check on his prisoners in the City Jail and visit to the Hoquiam Fire Department, Chief Ellefson was escorted in a Hoquiam fire engine to the Levee Street docks. Dylan and his family were treated to a private ride on a Brusco tractor tug-boat, including time at the controls of the $11 million vessel.
Since the tug is “drive by wire technology” and acts like a giant jet-propelled watercraft, Chief Ellefson maneuvered the vessel up the river. Being a kid with great familiarity with video games, Dylan was a natural and drove the tug like a pro!
The day ended with a table full of thoughtful gifts for Dylan and his family- gifts and funds all so graciously donated by our friends and neighbors here in Grays Harbor. Monday was just the first of several events for Chief Ellefson and his family.

 

Dylan is a 12-year old from Grays Harbor who is being treated for leukemia for the second time after being cancer free for seven years. Dylan has been chosen to be CHIEF FOR A DAY of the Hoquiam Police Department; he will participate in the Chief for A Day Celebration with 34 other chiefs and sheriffs from around the state at the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission on Thursday, August 21, 2014.

Mason County Sheriff swears in new Jail Officer

Sheriff Salisbury congratulating Officer Diaz after reciting the oath of office.

On Monday, August 18, 2014, in front of family, friends and fellow co-workers, Mason County Sheriff Casey Salisbury gave the oath of office and swore in Hector Diaz, the newest Jail Officer of the Mason County Sheriff’s Office.

Sheriff Salisbury stated that we are very fortunate to have been able to hire Officer Diaz and that he will be a worthy addition to our agency!  Officer Diaz also fills a much needed position within our short handed Jail staff ranks.

Officer Diaz lives in Olympia with his girlfriend and is looking forward to working within the Mason County Jail and serving the citizens of Mason County.  Officer Diaz is a former United States Marine and brings with him a wealth of knowledge and experience.

Forest Service Road improvement could block access on the West Fork Humptulips River

Blake ponders whether fish could even get to this small stream flowing across the current access road to the 'upper gravel bar' on the West Fork of the Humptulips River
The National Forest Service plans to block vehicle access to a popular gravel bar on the West Fork of the Humptulips River through proposed improvements to Forest Service Road 2203040 that include a turnaround and parking lot. State Representative Brian Blake is opposed to some of those changes, he tells KBKW “There’s a small rivulet that has been diverted and now runs down the access road to the gravel bar, and they’re using it as an excuse to cut off access, and that’s what I’m opposed to.”
The $12,000 Forest Service grant application says they need to block the access to restore fish habitat for salmon and trout apparently seen in the mud puddle for the past three years. “Oh no I’ve never seen salmon there in my life, no. Why would they do that?” I spoke with Jerry Lillybridge in front of his 24 foot camper responsibly parked on the gravel bar Sunday. He said he and his family have camped there for years, and while he hasn’t run over any fish that he can recall “Here’s what I’ve seen in the last three days, the otters, we’ve seen the ducks, yesterday I was up here getting firewood and I saw a red hawk take a grouse out and I’ve never seen nothing like that in my life, right in front of us.”
Lillybridge worked in the Grays Harbor County Auditor’s office for years, and for years he passed State parks, camp sites, and groomed fishing outlets on his way out here. “You can’t go nowhere and enjoy this without a big fee, or having a lot of people around you. I’m 41 miles from my house in Aberdeen to right here, and look at this – this is remote. There’s nothing more beautiful than here,” adding that most campers clean up after themselves, but; “If they don’t and most of them always leave it clean, I clean it up anyway because I don’t want the Forest Service to ever shut something down because I was messy.”
Meanwhile Blake worries “When we loose that gravel bar, and they won’t commit to preserving access to the downstream gravel bar – and I believe personally that’s critical for the launching of the drift boats especially because they can be anywhere from 300 to 600 pounds. So I think it’s important that we preserve that public access, for those boats, to the public river.” Blake added that “Not everybody can afford a forest pass, not everybody can afford a travel trailer. But having the public be able to pull out there and have a picnic, or spend the night in the summertime, I think is one of the reasons we live here.
While it won’t be specifically addressed at these meetings, the public has a few more chances to provide their input on a sustainable roads plan for the Forest Service this month.  The next meeting starts at 4 this afternoon in the Shelton Civic Center. They’ll be at the Aberdeen Rotary Log Pavilion Thursday afternoon.

Humpback whale washes ashore on Grayland beach

The whale had been dead for probably about a week and just washed ashore in Grayland Sunday August 19th. 
The tail had some very sharp cuts on it as if something had lacerated it. This is a picture of the crew working on the tail of the whale. They were not able to determine whether the whale was female or male because of the way it washed in, it would have taken many hours and heavy equipment to move the whale to determine the sex and retrieve some of the other organs usually checked in a necropsy. 
Veronica Myrsell and Marc Myrsell from Westport Aquarium were also at the necropsy working  with Dyanna Lambourn from Fish and Wildlife and interns from Cascadia Research. Report by Kathryn Myrsell

A 30 foot humpback whale washed ashore in Grayland over the weekend. Kathryn Myrsell with the Westport Aquarium tells us it appears to have been dead for at least a week, and had lacerations on it’s tail. The way is washed ashore Sunday prevents them from telling if it’s male or female. Teams from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with Cascadia Research, performed a necropsy on the whale Monday morning.

Here is a photo of Kayla Bosarge and and intern from Fish and wildlife or Cascadia Research. Kayla Bosarge who graduated from Aberdeen, High School this June and who will be going to Oregon State College next year to study Marine Biology  Kayle got to help with the necropsy on a 30 foot humpback whale, Monday August 18th at about 11 am. This was Kayla's first whale necropsy.  The whale had been dead for probably about a week and just washed ashore in Grayland Sunday August 19th.

Here is a photo of Kayla Bosarge and and intern from Fish and wildlife or Cascadia Research. Kayla Bosarge who graduated from Aberdeen, High School this June and who will be going to Oregon State College next year to study Marine Biology
Kayle got to help with the necropsy on a 30 foot humpback whale, Monday August 18th at about 11 am. This was Kayla’s first whale necropsy. The whale had been dead for probably about a week and just washed ashore in Grayland Sunday August 19th.

West Nile virus infection confirmed in Washington resident

Washington West Nile Virus

A Walla Walla County man is the first Washington resident in 2014 known to have been infected with West Nile virus in our state. The man in his 20s was likely exposed near his home and was hospitalized. The infection was confirmed by testing at the Washington State Public Health Laboratories in Shoreline.

Two other Washington residents have been diagnosed with the infection this year, both with exposures in other states. A King County man in his 70s and a Grays Harbor woman in her 50s were infected with West Nile virus this year while traveling out of state. Additional reports of possible infections are currently under investigation.

“The mosquito samples that have tested positive for West Nile virus in eastern Washington this season are a reminder that the virus is here and we should protect ourselves,” said State Health Officer Dr. Kathy Lofy. “The best prevention is to avoid mosquito bites — at home and while traveling.”

So far, 34 mosquito samples have tested positive for West Nile virus in 2014, including Benton County (11), Franklin County (11), and Grant County (12). The number of positive mosquito samples detected this year has already surpassed the number found during the past three years, combined (28).

Year after year, south central Washington has been a “hot spot” for the virus, with most in-state acquired human and animal cases having been exposed in this area. Mosquito testing shows the virus is in our state, and the mosquito species that transmit the virus are found throughout Washington. Regardless of where you are, health officials recommend avoiding mosquito bites to help prevent getting infected.

A few simple precautions can help reduce your chances of getting mosquito bites:

  • Stay indoors around dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Use a mosquito repellent when spending time outdoors, and consider wearing long sleeves and pants when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Be sure that door and window screens are in good condition so that mosquitoes cannot get indoors.
  • Reduce mosquito habitat around the home by dumping standing or stagnant water in old buckets, cans, flower pots, or old tires, and frequently change water in birdbaths, pet dishes, and water troughs.

West Nile virus is primarily a bird disease, and often dead birds are an early sign that the disease is active in an area. People may report dead birds online to public health officials. So far this year no dead birds have been reported with the infection in the state.

Most people infected with West Nile virus will have no symptoms at all. Others may develop fever, headache, or body aches. For a small percentage of people, West Nile virus infection can be very serious, resulting in encephalitis, meningitis, or other complications. People over age 50 have the highest risk for serious illness.

Last year, only two human infections of West Nile virus were reported, and both were exposed out of state. During 2012, four cases were reported, two of which were in-state acquired while the other two were travel-associated. The state most active year was 2009, in which there were 38 human cases, 95 animal cases (including birds), and 364 positive mosquito samples. It’s impossible to predict what each year may bring, so it’s important to do things to prevent mosquito bites and protect yourself from West Nile virus infection.

More information is available on the agency’s West Nile virus information line, 1-866-78-VIRUS (1-866-788-4787) and on the West Nile virus website.

The Department of Health website (www.doh.wa.gov) is your source for a healthy dose of information. Also, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.