Cosmopolis man tazed after he chops down neighbor’s tree, refuses interview

A Cosmopolis man was arrested over the weekend after allegedly cutting down his neighbor’s tree, then cutting it up on his property. Cosmopolis Police Chief Casey Stratton tells us a woman called from the 500 block of I street around 4 P.M. Saturday afternoon to report that there were two men in her yard cutting trees down. Officer Matt Nelson arrived and found a tree fallen over the creek that separates the woman’s property from the suspect’s. The woman showed Nelson a picture of two men cutting down a twenty foot tree in her yard. Nelson walked to the other property and found two men still cutting the tree into smaller pieces.
Stratton said Nelson began to interview 28 year old Jacob Ackley about the tree, but Ackley would not cooperate or answer questions. Nelson warned the man eight times to cooperate before he started to place Ackley under arrest for obstruction, Ackley resisted. That was when Officer Nelson used his conducted electrical weapon (taser) on Ackley (twice). Ackley was placed under arrest after that, booked on charges of Obstructing an Investigation and Resisting Arrest. Charges were also forwarded to the prosecutor’s office for trespassing and theft of the wood.

Stratton said alcohol may have been involved.

Truck drifts off roadway, throws debris into oncoming U.S. 101 traffic North of Shelton

The South bound lane of U.S. Route 101 North of Shelton was blocked for about 8 hours this afternoon as the Washington State Patrol investigated, and cleaned up, a 3 vehicle accident. No injuries were reported. Just before 1 Tuesday afternoon a 1998 Kenworth Tractor with dump bed trailer, driven by a 62 year old Vancouver man, was Southbound on 101 when it drifted onto the soft shoulder, rolled onto its side, and spilled debris into the road. The wreck also threw debris into the path of an oncoming car, a 2012 Jeep Liberty driven by an 80 year old Olympia man, and at a parked 2010 Dodge Pickup nearby. The State Patrol trooper listed the dump truck as totaled, the Jeep and pickup both sustained some damage.

 

Daytime closures over US 101 Chehalis River Bridge in Aberdeen modified

Drivers will be pleased to hear that previously announced short-duration daytime closures scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, April 15-16 on US 101 across the Chehalis River Bridge have been modified. No maintenance closures will occur on Wednesday, April 15. On Thursday, April 16, Washington State Department of Transportation bridge maintenance crews will close the exit to State Street and the right northbound lane of US 101 across the Chehalis River Bridge from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

These changes are in lieu of multiple daytime closures scheduled to occur each day through Thursday. Bridge crews were able to reduce the number of closures due to faster-than-projected progress on deep-cleaning the bridge’s areas that house moving mechanisms and gears that control openings for marine traffic.

Real-time traffic information is available on the Washington State Department of Transportation’s travel alerts web pages or by calling 5-1-1.

ASSE International seeking host families for exchange students

ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE) is seeking local host families for boys and girls from a variety of countries around the world. These students are 15 to 18 years of age, and would like to come to this area for the upcoming high school year or semester. These personable and academically select exchange students are conversant in English, are bright, curious and anxious to learn about this country through living as part of a family, attending high school and sharing their own culture and language with their newly adopted host family.

Those persons interested in obtaining more information about becoming a host family should call toll free: 1-800-733-2773. There are many students to choose from, so call and begin the process of selecting your new son or daughter today!

 

ASSE International (formerly American Scandinavian Student Exchange) is a non-profit, tax-exempt, public benefit organization. ASSE is officially designated as an exchange visitor program by the department of state, was founded by the Swedish Ministry of Education, cooperates with the Canadian Provincial Ministries of Education, and is approved by the Australian and New Zealand departments of education.

Hoquiam to rename a portion of Queets Avenue after James McQuade

The City of Hoquiam last night voted against committee recommendation and renamed a portion of Queets Avenue to McQuade in honor of a fallen Vietnam veteran who’s chopper was shot down while searching for missing soldiers under fire.

“On June 11th, 1972 the 23 year old pilot from Hoquiam Washington, [his gunner] and the copter was right above their leader’s chopper when it was shot down itself.” Dan Discher grew up on Queets Avenue with James McQuade, he told the council last night that McQuade left the Harbor to become a 1st Lieutenant in the Army, and flew for the 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Aviation Brigade.

1Lt. James R. McQuadeMcQuade was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross in 1974. “Col. Jack Kennedy, McQuade’s Commander was there, and he said ‘In the 25 years and two tours of Vietnam I never met a braver man than Jim McQuade’.”

City Councilman Paul McMillan got choked up when he explained that 5 other Hoquiam residents died during the conflict in Vietnam, “but only one got the Distinguished Service Cross, and that’s why we wanted to honor him, cause Jimmy volunteered to go into that, I think he needs to be honored tonight.”

Councilman Ron Tibbets suggested they send the report back to the Historic Preservation Committee, noting the time and effort put into the decision by the voluntary group. The council instead voted unanimously to reject the committee report that recommended against the rename.

McMillan noted that the street addresses won’t change, the new names will be placed over the existing street signs similar to Art Pocklington Way on a portion of 7th Avenue, and Roger Jump street on a portion of Cherry Street near Olympic Stadium.

First Lieutenant James Russell McQuade of Hoquiam, WashingtonFirst Lieutenant James Russell McQuade of Hoquiam, Washington, was 23 when his Light Infantry Brigade helicopter was shot down over Vietnam on June 11, 1972; his remains were found and his family notified in October, 1999.

“Lieutenant McQuade’s voluntary participation in a desperately dangerous mission demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.”

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) James Russell McQuade, United States Army (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop F, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Aviation Brigade. First Lieutenant McQuade distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 June 1972 while serving in support of the 1st Army of the Republic of Vietnam Division in the Thua Thien Province, Republic of Vietnam. Lieutenant McQuade was participating in a rescue mission of a downed helicopter crew in an extremely hostile area. Lieutenant McQuade, knowing that the downed aircraft had received intense automatic small and heavy anti-aircraft fire, volunteered to go into the heavily infested enemy territory to search for possible survivors. Upon initial entry into the enemy held terrain, Lieutenant McQuade reported taking heavy automatic weapons fire from all sides. With complete disregard for his own safety, he continued flying towards the crash site. As he proceeded to the area of the downed aircraft, he reported taking further anti-aircraft fire. At approximately 750 meters from the crash site and completely engulfed in hostile fire, Lieutenant McQuade reported taking numerous hits and, shortly thereafter, was hit with a missile of unknown type. His aircraft disintegrated in mid-air. Lieutenant McQuade’s unselfish concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers resulted in the loss of his own life. He was well aware of the risks involved but refused to give up the search in the face of the fanatical enemy resistance. Lieutenant McQuade’s voluntary participation in a desperately dangerous mission demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 56 (December 31, 1974)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reopens comment period on proposal to list West Coast Fisher populations

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has reopened the comment period on a proposal to list the West Coast population of fisher as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  The Service has also extended its deadline to make a final decision whether to list the species to April 7, 2016.

The Service is opening a 30-day public comment period to solicit additional information to more fully inform the final listing decision. Specifically, the agency is seeking additional information on threats to the fisher population.

The fisher is a large, stocky, dark brown member of the weasel family, and is related to the mink, otter and marten. About the size of a house cat, the fisher has a long bushy tail, short rounded ears, short legs, and a low-to-the-ground appearance.

During the reopened comment period, the Service seeks information related to toxicants and rodenticides used at marijuana grow sites, including law enforcement information on the scope and severity of this problem, and trend data related to the use of toxicants/rodenticides. Previously submitted comments are in the record and they do not need to be resubmitted.

The Service is also seeking additional information for West Coast fisher population surveys, which will help assess fisher distribution and population trends. The Service is particularly interested in the surveys in which no fishers were found.

Additional guidance on submitting public comments can be found in the Federal Register notice at https://www.federalregister.gov (search for key word “fisher”), or on the agency website at: http://www.fws.gov/cno/es/fisher/.

Comments and information can be submitted by one of the following methods:

• Electronically at http://www.regulations.gov. In the Search box, enter FWS–R8–ES–2014–0041.  You may submit information by clicking on “Comment Now.”

• Paper copy, via the U.S. mail or hand delivery, to: Public Comments Processing, Attn: FWS–R8–ES–2014–0041. Division of Policy and Directives Management; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MS: BPHC, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041–3803.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/cno. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel, and download photos from our Flickr page.

Eight days of morning razor clam digs approved, starting April 17 on Long Beach, Twin Harbors, and Mocrocks

Razor clam diggers can return to coastal beaches starting Friday, April 17, state shellfish managers announced today.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams on those beaches are safe to eat. All of the digs are scheduled on morning tides. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, noted that the upcoming dig coincides with the Long Beach Razor Clam Festival, scheduled April 18-19 in Long Beach. Festival events range from free clam-digging lessons to a fritter cook-off. More information is available at http://longbeachrazorclamfestival.com/

Under state law, diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches, and low tides:

  • April 17, Friday, 6:03 a.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks 
  • April 18, Saturday, 6:52 a.m.; -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis 
  • April 19, Sunday, 7:39 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis 
  • April 20, Monday, 8:25 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 21, Tuesday, 9:11 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 22, Wednesday, 9:57 a.m.; -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 23, Thursday, 10:46 a.m.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors 
  • April 24, Friday, 11:38 a.m.; 0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors

WDFW has also proposed additional digs in May, pending the results of future marine toxin tests. Tentative dates for those digs are posted on the department’s website at wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include: Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point. Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor. Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)
Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:
Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.
Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.
Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.
Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.
Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2015-16 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

During all upcoming digs, state wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula, and on a section of Twin Harbors beach.

The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and “horns.”

To protect these birds, the department asks that clam diggers avoid the dunes and areas of the beach with soft, dry sand. When driving to a clam-digging area, diggers should enter the beach only at designated access points and stay on the hard-packed sand near or below the high tide line.

National Junior Ranger Day this Saturday at Olympic National Park

Children of all ages are invited to bring their favorite adult to National Junior Ranger Day at Olympic on Saturday, April 18 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Olympic’s Junior Ranger Day will take place at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center located at 3002 Mount Angeles Road in Port Angeles.

“Junior Ranger Day is one of our favorite annual events,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum. “With this year’s special invitation to Find Your Park, we hope to see kids from near and far on April 18.”

Children accompanied by an adult can participate in a wide variety of free activities including ranger-guided walks, craft projects, and outdoor games. There will also be a wilderness “campsite,” search and rescue equipment, and emergency service vehicles for hands-on exploration, microscopes for a up-close look at insects, and the Children’s Discovery Room will be open for play.

Volunteers with the Back Country Horsemen of Washington Olympic Peninsula Chapter will bring their animals and will offer several demonstrations throughout the day on how to safely share trails among hikers, bikers, and stock. Junior rangers will have opportunities to meet the animals and perhaps feed them a carrot if they’re brave enough.

Olympic’s Junior Ranger program is a year-round way for children and families to experience and enjoy the park. Children can complete the Olympic National Park Junior Ranger activity booklet, attend a ranger program and explore park nature trails to earn a Junior Ranger badge and certificate. They also have the opportunity to participate in the Ocean Stewards program and complete a hands-on activity booklet to earn an Ocean Stewards patch.

For more information on Olympic’s Junior Ranger Day, please visit http://www.nps.gov/olym/learn/kidsyouth/beajuniorranger.htm or call 360-565-3146.

Baby Humpback Whale washes ashore near Westport, cause of death likely natural

A dead baby humpback whale was found washed ashore near Westport Saturday, Cascadia Research Collective, along with staff from WDFW and Westport Aquarium, conducted an examination on Sunday. The 25′ 8″ female was estimated to be just over a year old, and was found about a mile north of West Haven State Park. The blubber was thin with little oil, but the whale had been recently feeding on small fish. While a precise cause of death is undetermined, it appears to have been natural based on the necropsy. Numerous samples were collected for a variety of analyses, including genetics, contaminants, and general pathology; these may provide more details about what happened to this whale. Humpback whale populations have been increasing throughout their range, and strandings, which used to be relatively infrequent, are becoming more common along the Washington coast.

 

Cascadia Research, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Westport Aquarium conducted an examination today…

Posted by Cascadia Research Collective on Sunday, April 12, 2015

Westport Winery earns gold in New York Finger Lakes International Wine Competition

Westport Winery brought home five medals from the Finger Lakes International Wine Competition in Rochester, New York. This is the competitions 15th year with 73 judges from around the world judging 3708 wines from 27 countries.

2015 Boom FrontDirector of Winemaking, Dana Roberts, earned a gold medal on Boom Runner, a sparkling pomegranate wine that benefits Hoquiam’s Polson Museum. Silver medals were awarded to Smoky Nor’wester Sangiovese, Shorebird Chardonnay, and Elk River Riesling.

 

Smoky Nor’wester benefits the Museum of the North Beach in Moclips and features grapes from the renowned Red Willow Vineyard in the Yakima Valley AVA. Shorebird Chardonnay benefits the Grays Harbor Audubon and features grapes from Conner-Lee Vineyard near Othello. Elk River Riesling, also from Red Willow Vineyard, benefits the Twin Harbor Chapter of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

2015 Smoky Front

2015 Mercy FrontCidermaker Carrie Roberts earned a silver medal for Mercy, her hard apple cider. Each of Westport ciders (Mercy, Courage, Hope and Grace) benefits Mercy Ships an organization providing surgical care to the poorest of the poor in Africa.

Westport Winery’s award-winning wines are exclusively available at the winery. The tasting room, gift shop, produce market, plant nursery and bakery are open daily from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The restaurant is open for lunch daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and for dinner on Friday and Saturday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information contact Westport Winery at 360-648-2224 or visit the website at www.westportwinery.com.

2013 Shorebird PosterLaunch spring at the winery’s unique sculpture garden, lavender labyrinth, musical fence, 9-hole executive golf course, giant chess set, outdoor scrabble game, and grape maze, all located on the corner of Highway 105 and South Arbor Road halfway between Aberdeen and Westport. You will see why Westport Winery was named Best of the Northwest Wine Destination.