Archive for Dave Haviland

Coffeetalk Audio Archive

KBKW News

The “last 30 days” of CoffeeTalk with Doug McDowell. The file will begin playing when you click it, you can also click in the blue area to jump around. Click the Expand icon for a pop-out player so you can continue to browse our site.

File naming conventions are 
“Year.Month.Day-Hour.Minute.Second-D.mp3″

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Olympic National Forest asks “Which roads are important to you?”

Olympic National Forest Seeks Input on Identifying a Sustainable Road System

The Olympic National Forest is hosting open houses asking the public to share the areas and roads they use on the Forest.  This information will help the Forest identify a financially sustainable road system that meets diverse access needs, minimizes environmental harm, and is safe and dependable because it is scaled to available resources.

 

“Your participation will help us understand your access needs,” said Forest Supervisor Reta Laford.  “It would be particularly helpful to know what areas you use on the Forest and what roads you use to get there.”

 

The open houses will be held around the Olympic Peninsula during the summer of 2014.

 

DATE TIME LOCATION
July 30 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Quinault  – Olympic National Forest, Quinault Ranger Station • 353 South Shore Rd.
August 19 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Shelton  – Shelton Civic Center • 525 West Cota St.
August 21 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Aberdeen – Rotary Log Pavilion •1401 Sargent Blvd.
August 27 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Olympia  – Olympic National Forest, Supervisor’s Office •1835 Black Lake Blvd. SW

 

In addition to attending open houses, the public may provide comments using the web-based map or on-line questionnaire on the Forest website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/olympic/sustainableroads.  Questionnaires are also available at any Olympic National Forest office.  Comments will be taken until August 31, 2014.

 

Forest road.

Approximately 2,000 miles of roads on the Olympic National Forest provide access for resource management, recreation, and a variety of other uses. About 1,200 miles are open to motorized vehicles and 600 miles are closed, that may be opened intermittently for resource management.

As part of a National effort, we are conducting a road system analysis to identify the minimum road system needed “for travel and for administration, utilization, and protection of National Forest System lands” [36 CFR 212.5(b)Forest Service Manual 7710Forest Service Handbook 7709.55(20)].

By the Fall of 2015, we will integrate agency and public input to produce a travel analysis report that will provide the basis for developing future proposed actions for travel management.

Your participation will help us understand your access needs! Learn how to help.

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Washington Attorney General sues owner of Olympic Animal Sanctuary

Olympic Animal Sanctuary

A Forks resident who raised $300,000 for a non-profit dog rescue organization, but failed to register with the Secretary of State or produce required records of how the donations were spent, has been sued by the Attorney General’s Office for violating Washington’s Charitable Solicitations Act and Consumer Protection Act.

Stephen C. Markwell, founder of Olympic Animal Sanctuary, is accused of unlawfully soliciting and collecting hundreds of thousands of dollars in charitable donations while not being registered as a charity with the Secretary of State.

According to the Attorney General’s complaint, filed today in Clallam County Superior Court, Markwell also failed to maintain records of how the charitable donations were spent.

“Olympic Animal Sanctuary failed to account for how charitable money was spent,” said Attorney General Bob Ferguson.  “When organizations don’t comply with the law, we step in to protect both the public and the vast majority of our state’s charities that do comply with the law.”

Markwell registered Olympic Animal Sanctuary as a federal, tax-exempt non-profit organization in 2007.  However, his operation was not registered in Washington as required by law, until April 2013, when he was contacted by the Secretary of State.

During the six-year interim, his organization reported more than $300,000 in revenue generated from public donations.

As of Dec. 2013, Markwell no longer operates the Olympic Animal Sanctuary and has surrendered the dogs to a shelter in Arizona.

The Attorney General’s action does not address allegations of animal abuse or neglect as those issues do not fall within the Consumer Protection Act or Charitable Solicitation Act.

Concerns regarding animal welfare should be directed to city or county law enforcement and local animal care and control agencies. Consumers with concerns specifically about Olympic Animal Sanctuary and Stephen Markwell can contact Clallam County Animal Control at (360) 417-2459, or the Forks Police Department at (360) 374-2223.

For more information on finding charities, visit the SOS charity lookup. Consumers can also visit the SOS website for tips on giving wisely.

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State and local police asking the public to “Tweet Smart” at crime scenes

Washington State Patrol

Social media has become the tool of choice for sharing life events, from mundane things like family dinners to major, life-changing, emergencies

Seattle-area law enforcement agencies are asking you to “Tweet Smart” during emergencies, to help public safety responders keep you safe.

“Please don’t tweet about the movements of responding police officers, or post pictures,” said Washington State Patrol Chief John R. Batiste. “Sooner or later we’ll have an emergency where the suspect is watching social media. That could allow an offender to escape, or possibly even cost an officer their life.”

The agencies’ concern began to grow after watching events in Moncton, New Brunswick and Portland, OR.

“We watched these incidents as they unfolded on social media. In both cases, there was real-time information posted by individuals that could have compromised officer safety,” said Chief Bret Farrar of the Lakewood Police Department.

Along with not posting information about police movements, posting pictures can also put officers at risk.

“If it’s safe to do so, go ahead and take pictures of our deputies in action,” said Kitsap County Sheriff Steve Boyer.  “We’re very proud of the work they do. We’d simply ask that you wait to post those pictures until the emergency is over.”

In fact, pictures posted after the emergency can help investigators determine what happened as the event unfolded.

Here are some suggested dos and don’ts for the use of social media in emergencies.

  • Do get to a safe place and call 911 if possible. Live telephone calls to dispatchers are law enforcement’s best source of real-time information in an emergency.
  • Do feel free to let family and friends know you’ve reached safety.
  • Do feel free to warn friends if you have first-hand knowledge of a developing emergency.
  • Don’t tweet or post about the movements of police, or post pictures of officers. Even what seems like vague information could be used by a criminal familiar with the area.
  • Don’t endanger yourself to get a picture, no matter how compelling.
  • Don’t spread rumors. If you’re not sure, don’t post, tweet or re-tweet.
  • Do feel free to tweet about the response and post pictures after the emergency is over.

 

Although the term is “Tweet Smart,” the advice applies to whatever is your preferred social media platform.

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Back to Health with Dr. Mark Van Hemert July 29, 2014

Medicare should negate drug prices says Waxman of California. Electronic health records interfrere with Dr. consultations. Tylenol fails in low back pain trial.

What triggers disease?

 

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Part 2

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Back to Health with Dr. Mark Van Hemert July 22, 2014

Obama Care, Diabetes, and pills.

 

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Hoquiam council passes on marijuana laws, again

WA 502

The Hoquiam city council failed to adopt any of 4 proposed ordinances last night, “OK Fellas, let’s do something. We’re a deliberative body and we’re supposed to make decisions.” Mayor Jack Durney expressed some frustration after the council failed to pass either of two resolutions to further extend moratoriums, one was on Medicinal Marijuana Collective Gardens, the other was on Recreational Marijuana Businesses and expires August 9th.
Councilwoman Jasmine Dickoff said she thought adoption of the moratoriums failed because some council wanted to address the issues – one of which is two years old. They didn’t address the issue though, with 5 versions of a proposed ordinance to zone marijuana two were proposed and failed by one vote before the council decided they should wait until the two remaining members were at their August meeting.

Councilman Richard Pennant made a strong point for commerce; “$25 grams should be against the law.”

The city council also failed to adopt an ordinance placing handicap parking on a section of street downtown – because the ordinance didn’t include the address of the section.

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