22 years for Wash. man who fatally stabbed wife

EVERETT, Wash. (AP) — A 33-year-old man who fatally stabbed his wife on a Monroe, Washington, sidewalk as she tried to hand him a protection order has been sentenced to 22 years in prison…. …read more

From:: AP Washington News

Seattle police respond to report of cake assault

SEATTLE (AP) — Officers responding to an assault report at a north Seattle restaurant quickly got the facts: a man walked into a KFC, hurled a store-brand cake at employees, then walked out…. …read more

From:: AP Washington News

Charge filed against dad in 1983 toddler killing

TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Prosecutors in Pierce County, Washington, have filed a manslaughter charge against a 57-year-old man for killing his 3-year-old son in 1983…. …read more

From:: AP Washington News

Grant to help rebuild trail wiped out by Oso slide

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — A $75,000 state grant is helping Snohomish County rebuild a part of a trail buried by the deadly mud slide in Oso…. …read more

From:: AP Washington News

Driver runs over girl, 1, in Tenino driveway

TENINO, Wash. (AP) — A 1-year-old girl has died after she was run over by a vehicle in the driveway of her Tenino home…. …read more

From:: AP Washington News

Port of Grays Harbor expects to finish 2014 with big numbers

Port of Grays Harbor
Expecting good numbers for 2014 from the Port of Grays Harbor, Deputy Executive Director Leonard Barnes told Port Commissioners last week “we’re looking for a really strong finish to this year in the last quarter, very strong finish; all of our commodities are up.” Barnes said when exports in one area were low this year, another division seemed to fill the gap “You know even though the log business has been slow here in the last few months, the first half of the year was extremely strong so we’re still ahead of the curve.” The lulls kept the port from traffic jams on and off the water, as auto exports slowed when trains became hard to come by earlier this year. Barnes added “Even though we were hit hard with the auto [exports] the first half of the year with the winter storms and lack of engine power, we’re ahead of our projections and ahead of last years’ volume numbers. And we’re seeing some diversification with different types of autos now.”
In July, Pasha Automotive Services exported a record 17,109 automobiles, and they’re not just Chryslers anymore either, Barnes said the Port has been working with several car manufacturers; “May be small numbers from newer manufacturers, but that gives us opportunity to grow those businesses.” The cars are shipped by rail from production facilities in the eastern United States to Western Washington, then shipped to ports like Japan, China, Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

Report: More needed to improve oil train safety

By By PHUONG LE SEATTLE (AP) — With increasing numbers of volatile crude oil trains moving through Seattle’s “antiquated” downtown rail tunnel, city emergency planners say more must be done to lower the risk of an oil train accident and improve the city’s ability to respond…. …read more

From:: AP Washington News

Moda: Extending policies creates divided pool

By By BECKY BOHRER JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A spokesman for Moda Health says it doesn’t make sense for the company to continue to extend health insurance policies that are not in compliance with the federal health care overhaul…. …read more

From:: AP Washington News

WDFW seeks public’s assistance to monitor hoof disease in elk

For more information on elk hoof disease, see WDFW’s recent news release at http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/jun2314a/ and the department’s wildlife health webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/health/hoof_disease/.

OLYMPIA – State wildlife managers are seeking help from hunters and the general public in monitoring the spread of hoof disease among elk in 10 counties in southwest Washington.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) asks that anyone who spots an elk with hoof deformities in the area that is limping or dead report their observations at wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/health/hoof_disease/. A map on that website shows the department’s primary focus of interest.

Sandra Jonker, WDFW regional wildlife manager, said the department is primarily interested in receiving reports outside the primary area of infection around Cowlitz County, where the disease is already well documented.

“Our focus now is on assessing the spread of the disease to other parts of the region,” Jonker said. “Gaining more information about the incidence and geographical distribution of the disease will help determine how best to manage it.”

She noted that the website is designed to accept reports from the field using a mobile phone. Once filed, those reports will immediately appear on WDFW’s website.

Diagnostic testing conducted over the past year indicates hoof disease in elk closely resembles a contagious bacterial infection in sheep. There is no evidence that the bacteria are harmful to humans, but there is no vaccine for elk that contract the disease, Jonker said.

To help prevent the disease from spreading, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission recently approved a new rule requiring hunters in 10 southwest Washington counties to remove the hooves of any elk they harvest and leave them on-site.

Enchanted Valley Chalet relocated away from East Fork Quinault River

Enchanted Valley Chalet Relocated

Work to temporarily relocate the Enchanted Valley Chalet in Olympic National Park to protect the East Fork Quinault River was completed Friday, September 12.

“I am very proud of our park staff, and appreciative of the contractor and his work,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum.  “We are very pleased to know that the chalet is now further from the river.”

Work to temporarily relocate the chalet began September 1. Contractor Monroe House Moving of Sequim, Washington, used hydraulic jacks to push the structure 100 feet along steel beams and away from the eroding river bank.

Once the move was complete, the building was lowered onto cribbing towers and secured. The building will remain closed to the public while in its current temporary location.

A planning and environmental analysis process will begin within the next year to determine the final disposition of the building.

The chalet relocation project was examined in the “Emergency Action to Temporarily Relocate the Enchanted Valley Chalet for the Protection of the East Fork Quinault River Environmental Assessment” (EA) and a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) was issued on July 25.

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